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35

Not only you need bleed, but you need to consider if you need to shift the image a bit away from the borders depending on the binding method you are using. Saddle stitching binding allows the book to lay flat when it is open. The content that is close to the inside edge of the book will be visible. This method of binding is usually expensive. Perfect ...


26

How did they do this without computers? They used rulers. If you exclusively know how to draw with a computer: that's a straight edged object, to help guide a pen or pencil into a straight line. For really advanced technical drawings, such as the curve graph example, there were templates with different curves (elliptic, parabolic, hyperbolic): There were ...


17

Yes, with the image selected within the frame, press s (for the scale tool), click once to set the origin, then click-drag holding shift to resize the image. Or if your reference point (below) is set to the centre, you can skip straight to click-dragging. When preceded by command Fill Frame Proportionally this workflow is quite efficient. More on fitting ...


16

The purpose of bleed is to mitigate imprecision. The printer "may cut 1/16 inch off the pages" means that the printer will not guarantee that their cutter will be accurate within 1/16 plus or minus (a 1/8 inch range). So the question for you is not about cutting too much off, but whether you will be happy with a sliver of white paper showing when they don't ...


14

Engineers and scientists of different branches used to have drawing classes on their curriculum. Many of these people were quite accomplished at this. We used to have row upon row of drawing boards in the classrooms in the design/engineering departments. The drawings were drawn with pencil and then inked for final results. They would then be reproduced on ...


12

It's recommended to start new chapters on the recto page of a manuscript, as it establishes a predictable flow for the reader to follow. The resulting occasional blank pages are actually a part of establishing this rhythm, making the divisions between chapters even more distinct. This recommendation is listed in rule 1.48 requires login of the Chicago Manual ...


10

Traditionally stock sites allow you download a free, watermarked "comp" image which can be used in your design until the client approves the piece. Once the client has approved, you can then go back and purchase and download the non-watermarked image. You are free to purchase and download the non-watermarked image whenever you'd like however. It's not ...


10

You can not just use pictures from online sources without first looking up the license of each and every picture. No amount of citing the source will make it permissible to use images. Only the licensing condition applies, this is not a fair use condition by any stretch. Manuals don't fall under any of the common exceptions, although legal issues vary based ...


9

Edit: Here's something that came out recently (2013): Go: A Kidd's Guide to Graphic Design by Chip Kidd. It gets very positive reviews which tend to say that, while it's aimed at kids, the content is strong enough that it's good for adults too (I've not read it but thought it worth mentioning). Maybe a design magazine at the lighter end of the market would ...


9

There are many applications that can do this. I have explained two options that you may consider: (1) Paid Applications: (from Adobe) a. Photoshop - Image manipulation b. Illustrator - Vector Graphics c. Indesign - Layout your cover page/book exactly for Print & Publishing (2) Free Applications: (Open Source) a. GIMP - Image manipulation b. Inkscape - ...


9

My guess: their bindery equipment cannot guarantee to fold/score exactly on the line between your colored spine and the white cover(s). Same thing applies in three-fold brochures. I call it a "design element on fold." It requires hairline bindery precision, which is rare if not impossible (which is why we have margins & bleeds).


8

Your best bets would be "The Non-Designer's Design & Type Books" by Robin Williams, and "Before&After, Graphics for Business" by John McWade (in that order). They cover the mistakes, but also the core principles you should keep in mind while you work. Both are very approachable, well-written, simple and full of the kind of excellent design wisdom ...


8

Wow...it looks like you're not getting a whole lot of help here. I'm a graphic designer operating a design company here in Japan. To get you to where you're trying to be, I recommend using any "Mincho" typeface. That's the serifed variant in Japanese typography. If you have some Japanese fonts installed on your computer, they should have the name "Mincho" ...


8

Here in Switzerland there are quite a few multilanguage Examples with multiple languages on one page (even more than two). Most differentiate with color. (I don't have any example around but it really is very pretty). -- If you don't have color as an option this falls short. In addition to color many use different positioning for the type area. This way the ...


8

While changing orientation isn't unheard of (indeed, sometimes it can be used to striking affect), it's worth pointing out the full range of options available to you, obvious though they may be: Crop the image to a portrait format. Insert it as a landscape image despite the white space: too much white space is rarely an issue in an aesthetic sense. Insert ...


7

Out of curiosity, I looked at the book in question to see if there was colophon information. Some books include the typeface names used. This one did not. Then I did a search for 19th century free ebooks with type specimens and found one called Shniedewend & Lee Co's specimen book and price list of type, Shniedewend & Lee Co, Mackellar, Smiths & ...


7

No, usually not. This is a legacy of hardbound binding; these extra pages were glued to the cover and the inner pages, and do not count as "inner" pages. For a paperback, you don't need to explicitly add them. The page with the half-title is sort of a connector between the cover itself and the inner pages. Its use is (historically) to protect the real title ...


7

The simplest rule on this is usually the best: less is more. I have often found myself in the position where i was praised for layout that was simply not overdoing it (see also this long-winding answer on the topic). Inexperienced users will over-design and over-layout a document. Stick to 1 Typeface. You can have two, one for headings. But think if you ...


7

I, personally, would use ink and a roller, or a small pad/sponge, not paint. Ink will go on thinner, cover just as well, and not be tacky. Something like This India Ink. It's opaque, waterproof, and typically drys pretty fast.


6

A good textbook is about content. Without something worthwhile to say, the design fades away. Content is King. So let us look at what kind of content you will need. 1. Illustrations Most subject, need or at least greatly benefit from pictures to clarify things. The right picture at the right place can do wonders for your design. This said you can not just ...


6

A lot of the old engineering books have a chapter on drawing - for example, I have "A textbook on Electric Lighting and railways" International Correspondence Schools, Scranton, PA, 1901; the first 100 pages or more are about technical drawing. We had to learn technical drawing in school (1970s UK). One practical way to draw the lines on the graph is to ...


6

Whenever our copywriter has edits to his work, he sends us the original Word document (and a PDF version) with changes, with all of the changes highlighted in yellow. It's by far more efficient than what most clients do, which is a. send us a pdf with messy and hard-to-read correction tags or b. send us a stream of corrections in an email. I would suggest ...


6

If you can budget 20-30$ for a font, go to myfonts.com and search 'ornaments'. There will be many results and you can pick what looks best. Some good options are the Flourishes & Ornaments or Liebe Ornaments fonts previewed below.


5

Without a tablet or touch device, your best bet is to use vector graphics. I mean, some pretty incredible drawings have been done using mice and trackballs, but it takes a lot of time and patience to develop the kind of control you need for drawing on such devices. If you're doing raster drawing though, you're better off just spending $40-50 to get an entry ...


5

To avoid mousing over to the toolbar, or having to press the A key to switch to the Direct Selection Tool, you can just click the target in the center of your placed image (appears when you float your mouse over it). Then, as long as you have the content selected and not the frame (brown handles instead of blue), you can just drag the handles to scale the ...


5

There's a few ways to do this and of course it depends on how you plan to build your layout. Italic A common way to do this is using italic instead of different fonts. Some countries prefer the "main language" to be bigger and/or top on position, and the other language(s) will be in italic. Other countries must have all the languages with the same size ...


4

Paraphrased from the Chicago Manual of Style (15th edition; section 1.105 - Separate versus consecutive pagination): the decision for whether page numbering continues or begins anew in a subsequent volume rests with the publisher. They recommend that a publication with two volumes with a combined index at the end of the second volume would be easier with ...


4

Duplex printing is a function of your printer and it's associated drivers and software. Indesign simply prints pages. It is the printer's job to duplex them if it has that capability. The Brother MFC-J6910DW specifications do state it will duplex. You simply need to tick the option in the print dialog. THere should be an option for "2-Sided" or "Duplex" in ...


4

Could be the all-to-common scam of getting you to submit work (for free), then they want you to pay for the book. Basically, they do a very small run for the people that submitted work.... it'll never be seen by anyone else. They elude to it being an "artist directory" of sorts, but it generally isn't. They make their money by selling the books to those who ...


4

Lèse majesté is offering solid advice. My own recommendation on where to start would be to find local evening classes in drawing. There are several levels of skill to master: knowing how to see (not as obvious as you'd think), knowing how to draw, and knowing how to draw with a tablet. In most countries there are the equivalent of American community ...


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