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18

The easy stripped down answer is no. There are so many software variables, print driver variables, and even font VERSION variables, that it is very difficult to say exactly WHY a font looks different. The longer answer: But I would hazard a guess that what you are seeing is ink spread when the book is printed. Most books are offset printed on very cheap ...


13

This is a well-known problem with font design; it has been a problem for over a hundred years. Fonts look much lighter when they're printed on coated paper than on uncoated book paper. It's particularly a problem with many early digital fonts which were digitized directly from metal type working drawings. Unfortunately, metal type manufacture leads to more ...


6

Laser printers can be advertised to have 1200 dots per inch. Or equivalently 48 dots per millimeter. The marketing person hopes you believe a printed dot is 1/48 millimeters wide. But it isn't, it's much wider. There can be 48 accessible dot places per millimeter, but the printed dots are say 1/15 millimeter wide, more than 3 times as big as the marketing ...


5

In my opinion, all chapters should always start on the right side page ... all of them. In your example, Pg3 would be blank, unless there were additional text/images from the previous chapter overflowed to it. Leaving blank left side pages (verso) is fine. However, you should ensure you don't leave blank right side pages (recto). This eliminates most ...


5

It's not surprising that you find a print from a home printer inferior to a professionally printed book. Especially if you compare to an offset printed book, but high end digital printers are also superior to a home printer. When I print sketches on our office ink jet printer I normally experience the text to be bolder than it's supposed to be, but perhaps ...


4

Books can be any size. Web presses can often handle widths of 35", even extending to as much as 56". Often it's the bindery machines with limited size support, but if one wishes to hand-bind, the only limitation then become press size capabilities. Form vs Function One would probably question what use a "book" is with 35" wide pages....


3

You don't need 300dpi images for print. This is a myth perpetuated by those who don't understand digital image resolution. For more detailed information read The Myth of DPI. What you really need is an image of sufficient pixel dimensions so that when printed at 300dpi, at a specific physical size, it will be of sufficient quality. You don't need a special ...


2

If it happens that you want only an image, not actual printed books, you can place the same image on a few books as surface texture. The books are not equally sized, but the scale of the texture image is the same on every book. If the texture image is placed differently on every book it's possible to get at least approximately contiguous looking texture ...


1

I'm quite sure you have recently seen the next writing and then it looked much sharper than now: The difference: My copy is a screenshot. Letters are as big as in the original and contain as much screen pixels, but the original is sharp because the shown raster image on your screen is formed (=rendered) in your computer from exact vector font data and every ...


1

Knowing about the printing process is always a good thing, but as a designer you shouldn't have to worry too much about how the pages of your book are placed on printing sheets. That is the print house's responsibility. It doesn't really affect the setup of your document. You should just create an InDesign document with Facing Pages, Page Size set to A5 and ...


1

As the term implies, this is a custom print setup, where each cover is prepared as a separate file, each using the same flower image background, but shifted each time, based on the thickness of each book, which needs to be calculated based on number of pages in each book, thickness of paper in each book, etc. If you're just looking to simulate this, so not ...


1

There are printable foils out there, but it requires a special ink usually. However, if hot foil stamping is an option, you could have the printer foil stamp the gold block, then come back and use a black pigment foil to foil stamp the words. Make sure you check with them that none of the text is too small for a die.


1

The strokes don't seem to be as thick, for one thing. Is this just my imagination, running away with me? Besides the issues of the physical interaction between the paper and ink, it's also worth mentioning that there are some other font issues that could be at play here: The "Font Family" may be the same, but there are typically multiple weights ...


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