91

I think the perception of dullness is largely attributed to the lack of color in the new splash screen. I like your approach of epuration (I learned that word today), so my suggestion would be to just add back in some color. It's hard to design a logo that conveys "professionalism" if you're going to stick with Showcard Gothic, so personally I would just ...


69

I personally don't find this picture suitable for a logo. It has shading, complicated color changes, and tiny detail - it looks around 6x6 cm on my monitor, and has tiny stars which might be a single pixel at that blown-up size. Logos are meant to be used in a lot of different contexts, and instantly recognizable (without change) when printed in reduced ...


64

No. In case that wasn't clear: don't do this. Never change colours in a logo of a third party yourself. Any good logo has alternatives with less or secondary colours, or even a negative (light for on dark background). Use that. As Billy Kerr suggests, many big companies have dedicated download packs with all kinds of alternatives for you to use. They ...


50

An answer: The bag should output something - the text or something else in a cake. Let the business name be the biggest element.


34

It seems you and your client use different definitions of the word "original". You seem to mean it in the sense that you created the emoticons from scratch without copying anyone else. Your client seem to mean it in the sense that they look too much like other emoticons already out there. Compare this to much of pop-music. Most songs are original in the ...


34

I think this question is a bit broad. And I also think "polling" laymen or users for "what do you think of my logo" is always a very bad idea. "Design by committee" often leads to too many varying opinions and no clear direction. A team of a few is great... or a collaboration ... but a poll is generally fraught with those who will never be happy regardless ...


33

I know my first post is a bit "controversial" but I am not the type of guy that just says "that does not work". Here is a rough process to show how a lot of decisions has to be made. This is going to be a long post. To avoid any copyright issues we need to have an original work, so here are the first sketches of my interpretation of the rubber duck. The ...


33

It depends on the logo and how it's done. You should avoid reversing the logo, but it may make sense in rare cases to reverse it. For example, Nike reverses their logo on their high socks when their logo is on the ankle (but PUMA doesn't seem to). As mentioned in the comments, it's pretty common practice for airlines to mirror their logo on their planes as ...


31

Dummy it up! I would not "blur" anything. Blurring doesn't allow anyone to view the typeface you chose or it's actual size very well. Just replace any actual personal information with made up names and numbers. There's no need to share the information of others in a portfolio. This is especially true if the items will be viewed online. I've done ...


27

A logo should work as black and white because it might be used in non-conventional ways. In this case black and white denotes high contrast or 2 colors/textures. This means that the logo can be used in a setting where color is not available. Some examples of such things include: Laser engraving and etching on glass Image 1: Laser engraving on glass ...


25

It's about legibility. As in all situations, do not focus only on what they say but also on what they imply. If you look at the fonts listed that they choose as optimal for including in a text, all of them have modulated strokes. This means that the letter body gets thicker or thinner according to the path. One of the typography design statutes says that ...


24

The easiest, clearest solution to this problem is to not use figures of any kind in the logo. Stick to symbology and type modification. If the symbology uses some sort of nondescript "stickman-like" figure that may be acceptable. However, color will play a large role there. And one can mistakenly start getting into "cartoon" type of figures which may ...


20

I want to portray myself as a fresh, young but old-school designer that has an appreciation for crisp, clean design, though isn't afraid to go wild. Just my opinion.... take it with a grain of salt. Nothing about picking a font and adjusting the letter spacing reads "isn't afraid to go wild" or even "crisp and clean". To me (someone with a designer's eye) ...


20

Real world use is not that applicable. Sure they are nice for the designer's eye... but in most use cases an ambigram is less clear and less defining than easy to read text/symbols. Form vs Function. If you can't immediately read what is being represented, then using an ambigram is often contrary to its overall purpose. In many instances ambigrams ...


20

Fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) are sold to consumers, and one of the fundamental principles of marketing is the market segmentation. Companies offer various products for the various segments based on their income level. So in order to target a certain audience, you need to know the average income. A premium-looking product will appeal to a different ...


19

Make the character more obscure, since you're trying to represent humans in general. Unless it's a mascot – then using race is OK. It needs to be much simpler. It's not memorable to me, other than it stands out looking like a propaganda piece for some sci-fi dystopia communist movement. No disrespect to the designer. You need to ask the designer to ...


18

It is customarily not appropriate to ask for royalties on logo usage. Traditionally all rights are transferred to the client in logotype projects and the designer retains nothing. I've never, ever, ever heard of any designer trying to limit the usage of a logo designed for a client. That's simply not done in my experience. It's their logo and they need to ...


18

I think you should follow the official Sage guidelines. I'm sure you don't want to risk upsetting your service provider by messing around with their branding. On the Sage Pay website they say "Basic guidelines need to be respected when using the Sage Pay logo and payment type graphics" - source: https://www.sagepay.co.uk/logo-download-centre There are ...


18

Logo consistency is more important. Don't alter the logo for the vehicle wrap. Having two logo variants, regarding something such as movement, on one item will dilute the branding, even if there's sense in why there may be a variant. My general stance on logo variation is (sometimes limited) color , size, etc, is okay. However, don't alter the inherent ...


18

When talking about textmarks the reason is probably: Designers do not usually get to pick the name. Therefore the palindromic/mirror and or rotationally symmetric quality of the logo is up to chance. While you can manipulate the situation a bit, conditions leading to this kind of feature are quite rare. At least if you intend to avoid hard to read ...


18

Just to address the icon part of this, building on existing answers and adding a few things. I think the devil is in the details here. Quick blown-up sketch (n.b. the ratio of tip/bag is currently not ideal to represent a piping bag but not too bad for a logo which would have to be legible at small sizes): You want to keep the small details that make the ...


18

Ok. Finally, the postmodern era has reached this forum. I can not fully express my politically incorrect view on the "I am offended" part. But I will address some inconsistencies on the logo itself. That is not a logo, that is an illustration, a mission patch or something similar. It is very nice as such, but as a logo it needs to be simplified. A lot ...


18

People which frequent "Horror" movies are generally not the same people which attend the "Emotional Drama". Both equally viable audiences, but vastly different in terms of what appeals to them. The same general division can be found in financial capabilities. A family bordering on the poverty line are not the people purchasing luxury items. And luxury item ...


17

How to tell if the logos really are that similar Chances are if you're looking at this post, they are. But here are some tests you can try: Making them both grey-scale. Viewing them from far away (or very small versions). Are they even more similar with any of these variations, possibly including combining them? If so, the logos are probably too similar. ...


16

Something like this should get you started. The key is to imply motion by making the text appear to be trying to go somewhere. and because we read from left to right, make go from left to right. Otherwise it will appear to be moving "backwards". Note: the graphic is awful looking, but it is there to demonstrate a concept.


14

To maintain brand identity a logo should generally have a set color scheme. Generally... Full color Two Color (if appropriate) One Color Reversed If you vary beyond this and start swapping colors for every projects you greatly degrade any brand identity unless the color variations are for a very specific reason. Think of any major brand... does their ...


14

If you know of the opponent-process theory, you will know that there are 6 'special' colours: Black, white, red, green, yellow and blue. Although the receptor cones in the eye are sensitive to Red, Green, and Blue, prior to processing the brain encodes the information using 3 channels: Black:White Red:Green Yellow:Blue These 6 colours are thus termed ...


14

I've seen the use of colors which aren't a skin color, such as blue or orange or even gray to fix this problem. You should also consider simplifying the character (and the logo as a whole) Source PragerU sometimes uses a dark blue for people: I've seen others go with a silhouette In all of the above examples, they used one solid color for the skin-tone, ...


13

There may not be a good reason to redesign a logo if it is easily recognized and if the market generally has a positive opinion of the brand. In fact a better option would be to make subtle updates that keep logo pretty much the same but perhaps improve how it can be applied in different use cases. So make sure you have a good, solid business case before ...


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