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7

You could use a Scatter Brush in Illustrator rather than a pattern brush. Simply draw one shape... however you want no gradients or effects though, simple fills and strokes. And choose Scatter Brush after dragging the art to the Brush Panel. From there, it's a matter of adjusting the brush options. Be certain to set the Rotation Relative To: to path rather ...


6

My guess would be that whopper of a Fidelity setting. From AI help: Fidelity can range from 0.5 to 20 pixels; the higher the value, the smoother and less complex the path. Controls the amount of smoothing that Illustrator applies when you use the tool. (emphasis mine) I absolutely understand the confusion and why a high Fidelity setting may seem ...


5

Not asked, but as well you can try blending. It has a plus: You can get a series of shapes which evolve from the beginning to the end. Or they can as well have the same form, they only scale and rotate. Controlling the spacing isn't possible, blending distributes the intermediate versions quite uniformly between the start and stop shapes. You can edit the ...


4

Instead of a pattern brush, you could create a scatter brush. With a scatter brush, you can precisely control the spacing between the chevrons. Be sure to set "Rotation relative to:" as "path".


4

If you're using one of the newest Photoshops (2018..2020), it has Brush Smoothing ON by default. You can find the setting in the Tool menu on the top: values greater than zero will make brush follow the cursor with some delay to allow to smooth flickering and hand shaking. Here's the difference between drawing with smoothing and without: Note that I also ...


4

This is how Illustrator works. You are creating "Objects" with your brush and they are listed in the Layers Panel separately. That way they can each have different appearance attributes (different fill and/or stroke colors, width profiles, etc.). You can simply twirl the parent layer closed if this is bothering you or create a "Sub Layer" ...


3

For your needs the scatter brush suggestion may work. Be aware though that scatter brushes place each instance independently, You won't get the "skewing" and "distortion" on curves the same way a pattern brush distorts. So, it really depends upon the desired artwork. Adjust the defining rectangle for the pattern. Drag the Pattern Brush artwork to the ...


3

It should NOT change color of the image. Brushes in Photoshop are grayscale and contain no color data. You simply cannot create a color brush. All color is chosen by the user when painting with the brush. In addition, a specific form of multi-coloring, such as green for leaves brown for trunk, is never possible in a single brush. Any multi-coloring is done ...


3

Unfortunately you can't control sample size based on a distance for Scatter. I'd suggest to make a brush tip with a larger shape in the middle and smaller shapes around it to imitate this effect:


3

While brush Opacity setting is absolute and works the same for any brush, Flow effect will look differently depending on a lot of other brush settings: spacing, scattering, texture, dual brush, etc... In your example I'd think that spacing is set to a very low value so you don't really see any difference with high and low flow. Try openning Brush Setting ...


3

I was thinking about this question because I think I've bumped into this before... So, I don't think it's a recent bug. If it is a bug, it has probably always existed. Either way, the issue seems to be that Angle jitter on a square brush does weird things to anti-aliasing on the outside edges. Occasionally anti-aliasing disappears completely and generally ...


3

Brushes in Photoshop are always raster. There's no such thing as a "vector brush" in Photoshop. And as with all raster content, scaling, especially enlarging, can cause degradation. If you wish to use a brush and prevent any loss of quality, create the brush at the largest size you need. Reducing the brush size won't show the pixel issues as much. ...


3

You can go to any stock site and look up "torn paper" — you can find many torn edges like this in either white or transparent background. https://www.shutterstock.com/search/torn+paper


2

Yes there is setting you could use, but not with the Brush tool. Select the Clone tool instead, then in the Tool Options choose a brush shape, set the Source option to "Pattern", and Alignment to "Aligned", and choose a pattern to paint with from the Patterns dialog. There's also another technique. You could fill a layer with a pattern, or even just open ...


2

There's Filter > Filter Gallery > Texture > Texturizer > Canvas which will apply the texture evenly across a layer.


1

ADD1: This elementary transparency thing isn't the cause, see ADD2. Dropping linearly = increase transparency linearly. You expect that at some point, say at 50% point of the slope the brightness should be full 100 % if there's in the same place also a 50% point of the lower light layer. But it isn't. If the lower layer is also 50% transparent there can be ...


1

Do not insert fill color, change the color of the stroke. It unfortunately will have the same brightness level as the original brush definition image had, so black is not recolorable. That's of course for keeping textures. To make some coloring possible the original base shape is often 50% grey. Stroke color =black leaves it grey. But you can insert layer ...


1

In a non-photorealistic vector drawing a consistent style is essential. Inserting blurry pixel patterns to a sharp vector image isn't OK. Your stray hairs should be a sharp vector shape, too: This is a curved triangular shape. It's shown as straight and much widened below the image. ADD: These are not made with brushes. They are plain three node paths which ...


1

There's no such tool in Photoshop unfortunately. I believe Krita has one.


1

Windows>Dockable dialogs>Brushes Right-click the brush, and Open brush as image (image should be grayscale) Color>Invert Two ways to use the brush: One-time use: Select>Select All Edit>Copy Use the clipboard brush (first in list) Long-term use: File>Export as .GBR, in one of the directories listed by Edit>Preferences>Folders>...


1

A workaround: Paint black into a originally white layer mask. Have a new layer with white layer mask and the layer itself filled partially or fully with the new color. The layer must have alpha channel.


1

Make sure the blending mode is set to Normal on the brush settings. Different blending modes will affect the way your strokes are overlapping, precisely what's happening in your images.


1

Set the color mode of the image to RGB. Insert 2 adjustment layers. On the top you should have layer Hue&Saturation, option colorize=ON to set the color. Below it you have layer "Curves" to lift the black to grey. The colorization is disabled in the next image, the curves layer lifts black to grey: The full effect: Flatten the image or merge ...


1

As you see there's in your image a slightly 3D-like noise texture which is masked so that lightest areas do not get the texture at all. I guess the noise layer has a layer mask which is the actual photo inverted. The noise oviously is blended with the photo is such way that it only darkens. An example which uses that idea: The noise texture is originally a ...


1

Set one as foreground & the other as background, then swap using X


1

These brushes (at least the one I tried) are RGB brushes. For Gimp there are two kind of brushes: RGB: these are colored shapes on transparent backgound, so they carry their own color Grayscale: these are black shapes on white background: they work like a "mask" where the white is the shape and the black is transparent (partial opacity can be achieved with ...


1

It's a known bug. Adobe says it's fixed, but users disagree as you can see from the comments. My own workaround is not to use such a small brush. Draw the artwork at a larger scale, with a larger brush, on a larger artboard. Alternatively you could scale the artwork up. Seems to fix it too. Here's a calligraphic brush stroke applied to a path (top), ...


1

A workaround: You can take one of the trees at a time to the healing brush which has 100% hardness and big enough diameter. Alt+Click over the tree and then click where the tree is wanted. It works only in empty space. In many programs you can paste from clipboard to the cursor position. Examples: Krita, Inkscape. It doesn't work in my ancient Photoshop. ...


1

1- You have your own answer but I want to give mine. You can play with the opacity of the brush just dragging it to the artboard and replacing it. The example image, I changed the lighter gray color to 80% opacity. 2- You also may make an opacity mask, but not leaving the Illustrator. Duplicate the brush; Go to Edit>Edit Colors>Convert to Grayscale; Go ...


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