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Update (2020) So I just got an upvote on this and had an inkling that this might be a tad outdated and turns out it was. As far as I can tell the wizard in my previous answer (↓) has been scrapped and has been replaced with this new Styling Wizard. Here's a link to the API doc, if you want to read a bit more on the coding side of things. And some info ...


18

Assuming there isn't a reason why it has to be the Google-copyrighted maps you use, I'd use OpenStreetMap for this (the open source wikipedia-style Google Maps alternative). They're virtually identical but their license (Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike) explicitly allows this sort of thing including for commercial work, so long as they're credited ...


7

Get vector data You can download vector data from http://www.openstreetmap.org for free. Choose the region you need and choose 'share' (right side). Then select PDF and download. Recolor Artwork Open the PDF in Illustrator. Use Edit > Edit Color > Recolor Artwork. Trace the course To create a course (two continuing lines along the course): Create a ...


6

If a blur effect is acceptable, duplicate the outline of the state, fill the shape with dark green, send to the bottom of the stack, apply a blur.


6

Since there is no background attribute in a text object in SVG, you'd need to use another method, such as drawing a filled rectangle under the text, however as you say that's inconvenient as you'd have to resize the rectangle every time you type a name that's shorter or longer. One method is to use an SVG filter applied to some text to create a box around ...


5

If you'd rather start from scratch, you're talking about cartography with the difficult fact-finding and accuracy stuff cut out. It's not half as daunting a task as it initially looks - the key is in the preparation. Broadly speaking, a typical cartography workflow (minus the research and geolocation) is: Decide what details ('traits') you are including. ...


4

Open Vector Maps In addition to the great suggestions already mentioned take a look at http://openvectormaps.com. I created a library/directory of free, high quality city maps that are editable and layered. Choose from either .SVG or .AI file formats for use in Adobe Illustrator or Inkscape.


4

There are actually online tools that can do this. However, personally, I would start out with a google map screenshot and work from that - in Illustrator. You could take a round on the net and search for brushes and plugins for Illustrator that have ready-made map-elements. Here is but one example of what you can find: symbols ready made. Such as: These ...


4

If you'd prefer a fuzzy border inside the land's borders, rather than outside, try this... Create your vector land shape and give it a fill colour and no stroke Duplicate this land shape twice (press Ctrl + D twice) so that you have three copies. One copy will stay as the original land shape, one will create the border, and one will be used for clipping. ...


3

If I understand you correctly, it seems to me that what you need is ColorBrewer – an excellent tool for picking colour schemes for cartography.


3

In the Photoshop versions that support 3D, you can paint directly on a 3D surface, independent of the existing texture. Try making a custom brush from one of these flat objects, and "painting" it on. If your objects are simple enough, that might be all you need to do. An alternative approach (very much depends on the specifics of your application) might be ...


3

The issue with the equirectangular map is the Tissot Indicatrix, which is the way the lines spread out towards the top and bottom of the map (the distortion when wrapping and unwrapping the texture on a shape). See: Tissot's indicatrix How does one calculate distortion on Equirectangular Projection? Equirectangular projection USGS Publications Warehouse Map ...


3

You can easily draw the lines using the pen tool. 1) use the pen tool (P) and start drawing some paths. Once you're done with a road you can click on the black mouse (V) to stop/deselect the current path. You can change the colors by selecting the boxes next to the width stroke option. 2) Re-select the path using the black mouse tool (V). Change the stroke ...


3

I had the same issue that Tom brought up in the comments under Billy Kerr's answer, which led me to find a different solution... I found that using the Fill Background filter worked much better to add an opaque box behind text. Do the following: Select Filters>Fill and Transparency>Fill Background Open the Filter Editor using Filters>Filter Editor Click ...


2

Another source you could use is http://openvectormaps.com. It's a side gig I am working on and contains a library of free maps that are already layered in .svg and .ai formats.


2

I know this is a very old question, but its an interesting problem. here's a solution I came up with. Keep in mind I don't have a full grasp of usage. My goal was the indicate distance in some way visually while reducing the amount of white space overall in the image... The reduced background image allows for indication of a more accurate distance. While ...


2

The closest you could probably get without drawing it is to use the filter > stylize > find edges (adjusting the contrast first might work better). Once that is applied, use the threshold adjustment to make it black and white. Here is a quick example of the result: Another way is to use the filter gallery > stylize > glowing edges. This gives ...


2

QGIS (http://qgis.org/en/site/) has a PDF export function, but it isn't exactly easy by any stretch of the imagination, as it's a full GIS program, but can export to PDF. You can pull in OpenStreetMaps data as well. Open-source, free. Here's a good tutorial: http://multimedia.journalism.berkeley.edu/tutorials/qgis-basics-journalists/


2

The serif could be replaced by Copper Bowles, Copperplate hand or Adorn Copperplate The sans is trickier, but something like Revelstoke, Prequel or Davish


1

In Inkscape, you can define a grid with 45° (document setting), make the image partly transparent, enable snap to grid and thereby help yourself by manually performing the task, drawing over the shape to the nearest next grid point close to the shape: I'm not aware of an Inkscape tool, being more into the automation of the task. Screenshot from german ...


1

OpenStreetMaps (and Mapbox, which uses OpenStreetMaps data) both allow significant theming and export options, including PDF export, of maps. This would be the best filetype to open and manipulate further in Illustrator.


1

Use a custom brush. Take the artwork you want to repeat over the lines. In your case, the symbol. You can't use symbols in brushes though, so expand the symbol first. Drag the artwork to the Brushes panel (Window → Brushes) and from the New Brush dialog select "Scatter Brush" (You could use a pattern brush, but that will either stretch or leave spaces ...


1

You could make a document (or change the one you are working in) to have multiple artboards set up in a tight grid: Here you have 16 tiles. Then you add another artboard and make it cover the other ones: In "File/Export" you can choose which artboards to save as images. If you save artboard 1-16 you will get the micro level images. Saving artboard 17 will ...


1

The clusters appear to be roughly aligned along a 45° axis. To "compress" the distance between the clusters and preserve their size and relative orientation, position your "zig-zag" break perpendicular to the axis formed by your cluster plot points. Remove as much of the negative space along the axis as you wish to illustrate your point.


1

If the axiis really don't matter, the obvious choice is to reduce the size of the bounding box (border added for clarity):


1

I think most people have found themself asking the same question. I know I have. Generally I have accepted that every set of observations that exist within a quantitative and continuous range should be visualised using two-color sequential colormaps, that is one color gradually turning into its complementary color over the given range of values. If you are ...


1

Inkscape is another open source program you could use. But as others have suggested I would personally stick with Illustrator. Instead of grabbing a screenshot of a map you could start with a vector file instead. Take a look at this website I created. http://openvectormaps.com


1

Most cartography for publication done using electronic files was done using FreeHand to post-process for publication raw files exported from Geographic Information Systems (GIS) --- since Adobe bought them out, most map makers have grudgingly begun switching to Adobe Illustrator. You should be able to achieve what you want by placing the .pdf into a program ...


1

If both the color and the topography are on a single layer in Photoshop, or a single rasterized object in Illustrator, there is no automatic way to separate them. Hopefully your client can find a file of just the topography, or you could try to find a third-party map vendor to purchase a topographical map of the area - it shouldn't be too hard to scale and ...


1

A side project I am working on, http://openvectormaps.com, also provides a free library of editable maps in Inkscape and Illustrator formats. These maps would provide a great base to start from.


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