42

I made this little CSS3/AngularJS tool for a project to generate Material Colors palettes. You can enter your 500 hex color and use an external tool like ColorZilla to get the color values from there. Also the lighter ones are exactly the ones Google used, but the darker ones are off by a little. mcg.mbitson.com


28

here is the technical answer Saying that the color is #dd0017 is meaningless, unless it is paired with information about what color space you are using! Therefore also conversion from #dd0017 to CMYK is meaningless. With this off our agenda we can start to look what same would mean in your scenario. When you talk about pure color like #dd0017 you are ...


23

Short answer: you don't. Longer answer: it's literally impossible to take into account all screen settings and calibrations, circumstances and visual (dis)abilities of viewers. That is why there are guidelines for, for example, contrast of text and it's background, to guarantee some usability in at least a majority of cases. My personal workflow includes ...


23

You have "Only Web Colors" selected. Turn that off as its essentially irrelevant on modern computers. It's trying to figure out how to best represent 50% K in a vastly reduced RGB palette known as Web Safe Colors.


20

The google palettes are monochromatic. Which keeps the same RGB ratio shifting the Lightness and saturation up or down. To do this you have to convert the RGB value to HSL representation (Hue, Saturation, Lightness), alter the lightness and saturation then convert back if need be. It is possible to keep it in the RGB space while calculating, but the math is ...


18

Sadly, these very saturated colors can't be reproduced in CMYK. You could try to make the image in CMYK mode, where you make sure that the red is CMYK(0, 100, 100, 0) and the cyan is CMYK(100, 0, 0, 0). Don't make it in RGB and convert to CMYK as it might pollute the clean inks. I believe that it's important to only use solid colors (all CMYK values 0% or ...


14

NOTE: This got way longer than I expected, and I purposely glossed over a LOT of detail. If you'd like me to elaborate, just ask. PMS Colors - Absolutely brilliant when used as designed for pre-mixed spot color offset printing. You can be assured the color you saw in your Pantone book is very closely represented in your final printed piece. The problem is, ...


14

There are several ways of doing it in GIMP, and it depends on the end-result you want. From your question, one can't know if your desired result is really a "black and white" (only) image, or a desaturated image, with up to 256 shades of gray. Also, you have options to either desaturate only the active layer or selected region, and continue editing the ...


13

... if I try to assign a text the color #00FFFF it automatically sets it to #6FCCDC instead of converting it to CMYK. It is converting it to CMYK... CMYK and RGB have a different gamut, so converting from one to the other will result in color changes. The hexadecimal colors you have there are an RGB notation, so if that color doesn't exist in the CMYK ...


13

Set the tool's blend mode to Normal before painting with it.


13

As Billy Kerr wrote, Hex is not a colour space, but a numerical system such as the decimal system, but with base 16. The differences you notice are probably caused by different RGB colour spaces (such as sRGB vs. AdobeRGB), i. e. the RGB numbers from your graphic designer describe another colour than the mentioned online tool.


12

Open your file into Photoshop, open the channels panel, you will notice that the black and white areas are presented in all RGB channels. Go to Edit > Convent Profile. In the convert to profile dialogue box go to the section Destination space and dropdown the list to Custom CMYK. A warning dialogue will appear just click OK . In the custom CMYK ...


11

Select Image > Mode > RGB color


11

Sounds like Object → Flatten Transparency might work for you: Take a look at this simplified example: Using Flatten Transparency will turn the two shapes into 3 with the transparency, well, flattened: Unfortunately, this does not preserve the colors exactly as they are initially rendered. In the example above, the lighter pink changes from #FFABAB to #...


11

You're pretty much spot on, they are formulated differently for the different papers. Uncoated is a more matte finish whereas coated is for glossier finishes, although in part that is down to coated paper being naturally more glossy. Additionally due to the lack of the steaming and pressing process, uncoated stock is by far more absorbent and requires the ...


11

Converting to CMYK won't help you unless you find CMYK specific paint, which I'm not sure exists. Commerical paint manufacturers use a variety of non-standardized ways of expressing colour - so try this web based converter: http://www.easyrgb.com This will convert your RGB to a paint colour. That's the free option. If you want to be really picky, you'll ...


11

I will only complement the other answers. RGB to HEX will give you the same exact color. RGBA to HEX, will not because we do not even know what is beneath the color. If you put another color the overall color will change... that is the whole point of transparency. So you have three options. Convert the RGB values to HEX (without the alpha value) and add ...


10

Yes and no. Yes: It offers a smaller range of colors assuming that integers are required for each value. Photoshop, for example, requires HSB values to be integer and will yell at you if you try otherwise: However, your math seems to be off. You're on the right track with RGB: each value can be an integer from 0-255, so the RGB gamut consists of 256³ or ...


10

It seems like you're looking for the analogue of complementary colours, but in the lightness space rather than hue. As far I can tell, no such general mapping can exist. Suppose you could compensate for the effect by assuming a linear correlation between the background and the foreground, so that as the background darkens the foreground text lightens by the ...


10

If you MUST use Cyan and you want something around RGB saturation then you need to work with paper. There are some that reacts very well to certain paints and give them extra boost. They are also usually custom ordered so much pricey than regular print. Which make sense to eaither print with Pantone (as per Wolff answer) or ask your printhouse for a custom ...


9

Strength = Saturation + Brightness When you say "strength" I assume you mean saturation or the purity of the hue. On a mathematical level, you can simply match the brightness and saturation values in HSB color mode. Not so fast But equal luminosity doesn't necessarily result in equal strength or dominance. Color theorists Johannes Itten and Josef ...


9

The browser doesn't really care which format the color is in, performance is negligible. As such, I'll focus on the decision's effects on the developer(s) and the use cases. A lot of developers find HEX values easier to read than RGB or HSL. As such, I tend to use HEX so that the next developer working on the project may have an easier job, even slightly so....


9

Are you sure you need the GIF format? PNG would allow smooth edges with transparency. To edit the output colors you should first set your color mode to Indexed (Image > Mode > Indexed). For the conversion select Use black and white (1-bit) palette Then you can edit the color table (Window > Dockable Dialogues > Colormap). Just doubleclick the ...


9

It's caused by anti-aliasing, used by Illustrator to display graphics without pixelated edges. However, anti-aliasing causes display artefacts when two colours butt up against each other. The problem doesn't only affect Illustrator, but also other similar vector image editors. You can eliminate the problem by selecting the text box, open the Appearance ...


8

RGB is a color space that can only exist with projected light. It's physically impossible to replicate it on paper, which is a reflected light color space. So no, no printing press can 'print RGB'. At best, prepress RIP software can convert from RGB to CMYK. In fact, this is what most prepress software workflows do. How they convert to CMYK can vary ...


8

For examples like the one in your question, you can use a Solid Color layer with a blending mode. Open the image in Photoshop. In the Layers panel, select the circular icon at the bottom to Create new fill or adjustment layer Select Solid Color from the list that opens. Input the colour you want in the hexadecimal box at the bottom right of the box that ...


8

Matching colours between screen and print is a complex and sometimes impossible task. Due to the nature of light (Screens, RGB) versus ink (CMYK, Pantones, etc) and the fact that pretty much every monitor will display the colour slightly differently and print will look different in different lights. This kind of colour management is a job in itself. ...


7

Start with your target medium I typically start where I know the most prominent/critical use will be. For a lot of clients, that's the web. For some, it's going to be outdoor, vehicle graphics, and uniforms. It's all over the place from one job to the next. You want to be sure you optimize the palette for the most important application. Print For print, pick ...


7

Select the shapes. Object > Rasterize Shift-click with Eyedropper Tool Note color (write the numbers down) Edit > Undo Eyedropper (this is why you need to write down the color) Edit > Undo Rasterize Another way is to simply duplicate the objects, rasterize, shift-Eyedropper, then delete the duplicates.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible