40

Simply they do not print with CMYK, instead they use spot colors. Spot colors are pre mixed inks and require a printer to print with one more ink. Its a bit like going to a paint shop and ask for a custom color. You can get quite the range of things from neon, to metallic or even transparent varnish (that creates a shiny spot on top where its applied) There ...


18

There is a lot to unpack here. An illustrator made a beautiful cover for me in neon, but when we converted the cover from RGB to CMYK what was neon became matte. No. He did a beautiful cover for you... probably using an incorrect color profile. He made it on RGB mode which for the screen is ok. But a digital Paint MUST be worked from start using a correct ...


5

This is not possible using the Difference Blend Mode with your chosen background color (#333333). The math formula for the difference blend mode is (B-A). B is the background color and A is the foreground color.The result will always be a positive number (disregard the negative). In RGB your background color (#333333) is 51,51,51- Your foreground color (#...


4

First, get a good intro to AA and AAA accessibility guidelines: https://www.w3.org/WAI/perspective-videos/contrast/ If you want to go beyond adjusting a few colors, here's deeper food for thought on designing for color blindness: https://www.secretstache.com/blog/designing-for-color-blind-users/ Highlight takeaways are: Use colors and symbols to convey ...


4

There's in a comment hinted the question is duplicate of an older case. But you have quite high resolution image which can be modified better than the image in the duplicate candidate. Start by removing the background and desaturating. Any color would be harmful because it would get distorted. White background maybe isn't optimal and it would also generate ...


4

If you can manage taking high quality photos in this (the way your examples are shown) kind of layout and good light, you can use selection tools and manual shadows in Photoshop: Take photo of the products Select the products (discarding shadows) using pen tool (I prefer) and paste them in new layers Cntl+J Separately draw shapes for the shadows, each in ...


3

Just a quick augment to the other answers here, one way to deal with this specific instance is to take the original illustration and then manually separate it into two separate greyscale images. You can then provide these separated files, along with discussion with the printer/prepress people. In your question, the job looks to be a two-color job and is ...


3

Forget pure color based approach - in real photos there's so much noise that you do not get the effect limited to the wanted blue parts. Bite the bullet. Make a layer duplicate and remove there all except the parts you want to make white. Draw a path or use other background removal methods. The challenge isn't impossible, but you may need to practice a while ...


2

I am writing another answer because this is a very particular and specific case. I am sorry, but the file is not ready at all to be used with fluorescent inks. Here are just some examples of what could be done, of course, I am spamming again. Understanding these concepts first. Here is the green channel tweaked to be used as Fluorescent-Green. Extract ...


2

When I come across a horrible mismatch, such as this, I ignore the apparent incorrect color and use a value which more closely resembles the color from the correct color breakout. So Yes. I change the HEX when I see this happening. If at all possible I do check things like the client's web presence or any marketing materials to confirm I don't see the ...


2

No. Any automated solution would merely toggle values, all values. Automation would never know what should be adjusted and what shouldn't. What needs adjustment could only ever be determined by a human operator. That being posted, you could merely "invert" all images... quick, easy, and simple.. but results will be largely unpredictable and in ...


2

Here's one method. Assuming you have a multichannel .psb already saved, open it in Photoshop, and Select all Ctrl+A, and then Copy Ctrl+C. Close the image file without saving. This is just to get the document size for the next step. Do File > New, choose the Clipboard size option. Set the colour mode to RGB. Click Create. A new blank document will open,...


2

Yes, there is always a significant difference between RGB and CMYK whatever conversion you're doing. Yes, RGB tends to be significantly brighter and/or more saturated, than the converted CMYK equivalent. No, the final print on paper will not look like any of the RGB and CMYK variations on-screen. The end product will also look slightly off. No, the designer ...


2

If your pattern (I mean your artwork) is non-transparent, I think you just need blending mode Normal only. Then you can add a solid color layer (#375459) and use it as a clipping mask. You should get what you need. What you're doing wrong: I think the problem is just blend mode you've set. You can also use Layer > Layer Style > Blending Options > ...


1

You can't unfortunately. The colour of the paper will show through the inks. Printer inks as semi-transparent, and anything coloured white is non-printing. I realize you probably don't want to hear this, but this is how printing works. Although you could perhaps tweak the colour balance of images, perhaps by making them a little cooler, you can't escape the ...


1

You can not. At least is impossible with some colors. Take for example white color. Printed on colored paper you will totally, totally erase any trace of white. Now take a complementary color, the blue tones more or less opposed to the beige color. They will look darker because some light is absorbed by the paper and some other by the ink. Sort off What you ...


1

I will elaborate a bit based on Wolff's comment. Forget Pantone's values. The reason is that Pantone should be using American Standards, and Fogra, although is used internationally started as a European standard and has different values, for example, TAC. As I do not currently have a copy of Adobe's program on this computer I can not confirm that each ...


1

Generally, yes HSL is a polar(ish), or more accurately hexagon, transformation of the standard RGB color space as such each value only corresponds to one possible RGB triplet. This is however what would happen if we assume the numbers are numbers in the mathematical sense. Implementation Details Matter However, the individual implementation details of each ...


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