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There is no mention of CMYK in the GIF specification, and it only supports color triplets. Take a peek at the syntax for color tables given by the spec: 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Field Name Type +===============+ 0 | | Red 0 Byte +- -+ 1 | | ...


12

The short answer is no, a GIF can't support a CMYK profile. A CMYK profile is a series off curves that map the percentage value of each separation to a target. GIF images are saved as INDEXED COLOUR, which then references an RGB value for each colour. While CMYK values could be derived from the RGB values (the RGB gamut is wider than the CMYK gamut so some ...


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I can't really claim to know much of anything about mixing house paint.... It's my understanding though that the mixing system is more akin to a Pantone mix than a CMYK mix. On screen, it would be just a black. It would equate to 0R0G0B so.. black. ---> RGB -- > On press.. it'll get rejected by most prepress departments or at least get changed. The ...


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What probably happens: The screenshot is a 16-bit png, but illustrator reads it as an 8-bit png, using only the 8 lower (!) bits. Explanation For the following explanation we assume that the screenshot is a 16-bit grayscale image, that is every pixel is a number between black = 0 = 0x0000 = 0b 0000 0000 0000 0000 and (16-bit) white = 2^16-1 = 65535 = 0xFFFF =...


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To understand why printers do not use red, green, and blue ink to reproduce color from the light spectrum, you need to research CMYK printing. I'll avoid all the additive/subtractive explanation. Around 1900 a printing company first incorporated cyan, magenta, yellow, and black inks into a printing press to reproduce color. Through that company's research ...


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Actually, there already exist printing systems which let you choose your colors. In screen or offset printing you can use any existing color to print something. Now lets say we'd choose red, green and blue as printing colors. We'd still have a subtractive color system (If there's more ink on the paper, there will be less light reflected. So the color gets ...


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Introduction To understand this we need to look at the entire system. The system consists of at least 3 parts: the observers brain, light transfer to the eye and the technical system from where it came. Central to part to how light works is in the eye transfer. If we cut corners a bit, so that we can have a discussion at a reasonable length, one can say that ...


9

The web is all sRGB all the way. If you upload an image created in ProPhoto or Adobe RGB, it will show on the web as if it were sRGB. The result is a large or small color change, depending on the image. This is guaranteed to happen if your image doesn't have an embedded color profile; there are few circumstances in which a color profile will be acknowledged. ...


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It's caused by anti-aliasing, used by Illustrator to display graphics without pixelated edges. However, anti-aliasing causes display artefacts when two colours butt up against each other. The problem doesn't only affect Illustrator, but also other similar vector image editors. You can eliminate the problem by selecting the text box, open the Appearance ...


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The developers are aware of the issue but aren't willing to fix it, they consider it a 'feature'. When we export an image, we interpret our color values in the sRGB colorspace. We also save the color space in the metadata, unless you have ‘Save for Web’ checked in the export panel. Regardless of that setting though, the intent has been to save with sRGB, ...


7

It's common to refer to these elements as "registration marks" but that's not completely accurate. There are multiple components: Registration marks: thin lines/circles on multiple axes to detect misalignment between color plates. This is what the "Registration" swatch is commonly used for. Color bars: solid and screen value blocks of color (sometimes ...


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The new versions of Sketch have an easy feature to make sure the colors when exporting are the same as the ones you see on your screen. Navigate to Preferences › General › Color Profile, and then change the color setting to Display P3. This will change your color profile to the one Macs use. Then, do the same thing again, but this time select sRGB. Now, you ...


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Your question makes sense but there's no answer. These are all arbitrary names created by man to help classify spectrums. Green doesn't magically end at point X and start point Y. There's simply put too many factors and human interpretation. For example, a BBC Documentary came out a while back discussing the Himba Tribe which has far more names for colors ...


7

No, you can't expect RGB colors to translate exactly to CMYK for printing. Monitors make colors with light. Light can be any intensity. Ink is made of solid physical colors from things like rocks, which are ground up and put in a medium like oil or latex. You spread ink on paper and it's never going to be as bright as a color on a monitor. Offset ...


6

As far as choosing a corporate color goes, I would said neither RGB or CMYK. Rather, go for a Pantone color and derive the RGB/CMYK values from that. The Pantone Solid Coated color libraries are available in both Illustrator and Photoshop, but truly you should select the color from a physical swatch. A local paint store might have the color book available ...


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The premise of the question is flawed for a few reasons. A print proof is meant to mimic the final product. The idea is that you view the proof with the expectation that the final product will look exactly like that. That concept doesn't exist on the web. For a number of reasons: There is no defined canvas size. Unlike a piece a paper, a web browser can ...


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Your Inkjet printer has to support CYMK. Thus double check before you proceed. Otherwise colours are always converted to RGB. Also make sure that the latest printer drivers are installed. You can export your Illustrator/photoshop file to a PDF file. This way you can open your document in Acrobat which offers advanced print settings like preview color ...


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Exactly how a color profile is stored in an image depends on the image format. In PNG, for example, it's contained in a PNG iCCP chunk. In JPEG, it's stored in a particular "marker". For other image formats, see http://www.color.org/profile_embedding.xalter About the "why", the embedded color profile tells how the image author intended it to appear. ...


5

Use ghostscript, its the most obvious OSS tool for the job. Here's a sample for windows usage from stackoverflow [1]: gswin32.exe ^ -o c:/path/to/output-cmyk.pdf ^ -sDEVICE=pdfwrite ^ -dUseCIEColor ^ -sProcessColorModel=DeviceCMYK ^ -sColorConversionStrategy=CMYK ^ -sColorConversionStrategyForImages=CMYK ^ input-rgb.pdf Tested ...


5

Any monitor worth the buying price will have a basic ICC color profile which should be downloadable from the manufacturer's website. (True of any device that produces visual output, including printers.) Usually the profile comes on a CD, which seldom escapes from its sleeve, so that the profile never makes it onto the computer. Worse, an ICC profile for the ...


5

It can be said to be an (old) alternative to vector. I have used it for some very old logos and drawings, but more recently in signatures. It is not vectorized, and not anti-aliased, so it needs to have very high resolution in order to not appear pixelated. It can only have one color. If you place a bitmap colored file in InDesign, you can actually change ...


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This is kind of a history thing, I'm sure the mode is being used in creative ways differently that how I describe, but --- In traditional PostScript-based offset (big printing press) printing the imaging is done in one of two ways (to simplify things) -- As a half-tone where a raster image is broken down into dots and those dots are in a grid with ...


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The post is stating a fact. You dont need to see the correct color on your monitor. It is true that you dont need monitor calibration. Many designers can and do live without it. According to our printmasters its entirely normal that designers have turned their color management off; Apparently because that makes users more comfortable designing as color ...


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Why bother about color profiles? First of all you need to accept that different printers follow different standards. The same CMYK numbers will look differently when printed according to different standards. It's not possible to make a PDF which will be perfect under all circumstances. Unless I absolutely have to, I wouldn't export a PDF for print before ...


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You could always buy them by the chips if you only need them temporary: PANTONE PLASTIC STANDARD Chips Pantone Chip Journal Google Search for Pantone Chips Another option would be to see if someone is selling them used (local sign shop/print shop). Some shops do believe that a rotation of 2 years is standard to purchase and stay up to date with Pantone ...


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Profile is like a address in the space of color reproduction. The monitor profile tells you where your monitor is in this space. The image profile tells you where the image is in this space. In order to navigate between these points and any other point you need to know: where you are where you want to go what to do with the bits that exceed this conversion (...


4

What you are running into is one of the big differences between video and still photography/design. Video's heritage is television, which has very different technical requirements and standards. In video there is no such thing as #000. In the same way, there is no #fff, no #ff000, no #00ff00, etc.. TV and video standards do not permit levels of 0 or 255 on ...


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The already mentioned ghostscript is the free standard tool for this problem. If the use of the command line looks too daunting, you could use a free web service like: http://www.pdf2cmyk.com. You won't have any control whats really happening with your images, but the results are good as far as I tested. You can choose different output profiles (SWOP and ISO)...


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Inkscape cannot embed CMYK color profiles, sorry. Scribus can, though. Here's a workflow that I have successfully used to get a print-production-ready PDF (with the "ISO Coated v2 300% (ECI)" color profile properly embedded). It is taken from a more detailed article on my blog. A word of warning: The workflow involves converting colors manually, so if you ...


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The Pantone color is for printing on a press that is using pantone inks. The hex color is for web design. Your office printer uses neither of those things and is a CMYK printer, so won't match either perfectly. The CVU color has a U at the end to refer to 'uncoated'. It means that is the color designated for printing on uncoated paper. (as opposed to ...


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