Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
17

RGB is an additive spectrum... you ADD colors to get white. Dkuntz is correct stating that RGB is light-based. It is. It uses the visible light spectrum to display colors. CMYK is a subtractive spectrum... you REMOVE color to get white. DKuntz's use of the term "color-based theory" is really nonsensical. Since RGB is also a color spectrum. A more ...


14

Short answer: you can't. Technical answer: RGB is additive. The more color (made of light) you add, the closer you get to white. CMYK is subtractive. The more color (made of ink, which is reflective, which subtracts light) you add, the closer you get to black (or actually a muddy brown). CMYK has a smaller range, or gamut, of colors it can reproduce than ...


13

I can't really claim to know much of anything about mixing house paint.... It's my understanding though that the mixing system is more akin to a Pantone mix than a CMYK mix. On screen, it would be just a black. It would equate to 0R0G0B so.. black. ---> RGB -- > On press.. it'll get rejected by most prepress departments or at least get changed. The ...


12

Not to detract from Marc's excellent and comprehensive answer, there are some points that are worth a bit more explanation. It's a big subject. This gets geeky before it gets better, so bear with me and follow closely. :) CMYK and RGB are "color models," not color profiles. A color model is a way to represent colors using numbers. There are other models, ...


12

There is no mention of CMYK in the GIF specification, and it only supports color triplets. Take a peek at the syntax for color tables given by the spec: 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Field Name Type +===============+ 0 | | Red 0 Byte +- -+ 1 | | ...


12

The short answer is no, a GIF can't support a CMYK profile. A CMYK profile is a series off curves that map the percentage value of each separation to a target. GIF images are saved as INDEXED COLOUR, which then references an RGB value for each colour. While CMYK values could be derived from the RGB values (the RGB gamut is wider than the CMYK gamut so some ...


11

To understand why printers do not use red, green, and blue ink to reproduce color from the light spectrum, you need to research CMYK printing. I'll avoid all the additive/subtractive explanation. Around 1900 a printing company first incorporated cyan, magenta, yellow, and black inks into a printing press to reproduce color. Through that company's research ...


10

A couple of points adding to Lauren's and e100's excellent answers: 1) A desktop printer is an RGB device, not CMYK. Although the inks most such printers use are the standard four, sometimes with additional inks (my Canon proofing printer adds a "photo cyan" "photo magenta" red and green for a total of eight), both the printer and the software that drives ...


10

It's actually far simpler than it may first appear. The bottom line is that it's best to convert to the most native format as early as possible. Full colour printing typically uses four inks to create a photorealistic image. In theory, cyan, magenta and yellow should be enough to print a high quality image, but adding black aids the printing process, giving ...


10

It seems like you're looking for the analogue of complementary colours, but in the lightness space rather than hue. As far I can tell, no such general mapping can exist. Suppose you could compensate for the effect by assuming a linear correlation between the background and the foreground, so that as the background darkens the foreground text lightens by the ...


10

Actually, there already exist printing systems which let you choose your colors. In screen or offset printing you can use any existing color to print something. Now lets say we'd choose red, green and blue as printing colors. We'd still have a subtractive color system (If there's more ink on the paper, there will be less light reflected. So the color gets ...


9

The web is all sRGB all the way. If you upload an image created in ProPhoto or Adobe RGB, it will show on the web as if it were sRGB. The result is a large or small color change, depending on the image. This is guaranteed to happen if your image doesn't have an embedded color profile; there are few circumstances in which a color profile will be acknowledged. ...


9

What probably happens: The screenshot is a 16-bit png, but illustrator reads it as an 8-bit png, using only the 8 lower (!) bits. Explanation For the following explanation we assume that the screenshot is an 16-bit grayscale image, that is every pixel is a number between black = 0 = 0x0000 = 0b 0000 0000 0000 0000 and (16-bit) white = 2^16-1 = 65535 = ...


9

Introduction To understand this we need to look at the entire system. The system consists of at least 3 parts: the observers brain, light transfer to the eye and the technical system from where it came. Central to part to how light works is in the eye transfer. If we cut corners a bit, so that we can have a discussion at a reasonable length, one can say ...


8

It's got nothing to do with Windows vs. Mac - walk into any office and look at the different monitors on folks' desks. Assuming you're using a standard color scheme (sRGB, etc.) the information will go out to each of those monitors the same way (i.e., white = "ffffff" which is hexidecimal for "turn the red, green, and blue values for that pixel all the way ...


7

Start with your target medium I typically start where I know the most prominent/critical use will be. For a lot of clients, that's the web. For some, it's going to be outdoor, vehicle graphics, and uniforms. It's all over the place from one job to the next. You want to be sure you optimize the palette for the most important application. Print For print, ...


7

It's common to refer to these elements as "registration marks" but that's not completely accurate. There are multiple components: Registration marks: thin lines/circles on multiple axes to detect misalignment between color plates. This is what the "Registration" swatch is commonly used for. Color bars: solid and screen value blocks of color (sometimes ...


7

Your question makes sense but there's no answer. These are all arbitrary names created by man to help classify spectrums. Green doesn't magically end at point X and start point Y. There's simply put too many factors and human interpretation. For example, a BBC Documentary came out a while back discussing the Himba Tribe which has far more names for colors ...


6

I'd guess that the problem is your starting point for the document. Choose "Web" for the document type rather than Basic RGB, or be very sure the color space is sRGB and not the wider Adobe RGB. Going that route, I see no difference in the output of Export or Save for Web, and wouldn't expect to. When you Save for Web, you don't see a problem because AI ...


6

Create swatches (in whatever App you start in) then export swatches as an .ase file. In every other app you can load the .ase file into swatches. . . .ase files can be loaded into any Adobe app which uses swatches. Web sites such as Adobe's Kuler.com will also allow you to save themes in an .ase format.


6

The premise of the question is flawed for a few reasons. A print proof is meant to mimic the final product. The idea is that you view the proof with the expectation that the final product will look exactly like that. That concept doesn't exist on the web. For a number of reasons: There is no defined canvas size. Unlike a piece a paper, a web browser can ...


6

As far as choosing a corporate color goes, I would said neither RGB or CMYK. Rather, go for a Pantone color and derive the RGB/CMYK values from that. The Pantone Solid Coated color libraries are available in both Illustrator and Photoshop, but truly you should select the color from a physical swatch. A local paint store might have the color book available ...


6

Your Inkjet printer has to support CYMK. Thus double check before you proceed. Otherwise colours are always converted to RGB. Also make sure that the latest printer drivers are installed. You can export your Illustrator/photoshop file to a PDF file. This way you can open your document in Acrobat which offers advanced print settings like preview color ...


6

The developers are aware of the issue but aren't willing to fix it, they consider it a 'feature'. When we export an image, we interpret our color values in the sRGB colorspace. We also save the color space in the metadata, unless you have ‘Save for Web’ checked in the export panel. Regardless of that setting though, the intent has been to save with sRGB, ...


5

My (sometimes controversial) opinion: People who recommend using sRGB for user interface and web design are crazy. Here's why. For colour management to work for screen design, there's three important things that must happen. The image must be created using the correct workflow. The image must be saved with the correct ICC colour profile. The image must be ...


5

Any monitor worth the buying price will have a basic ICC color profile which should be downloadable from the manufacturer's website. (True of any device that produces visual output, including printers.) Usually the profile comes on a CD, which seldom escapes from its sleeve, so that the profile never makes it onto the computer. Worse, an ICC profile for the ...


5

The new versions of Sketch have an easy feature to make sure the colors when exporting are the same as the ones you see on your screen. Navigate to Preferences › General › Color Profile, and then change the color setting to Display P3. This will change your color profile to the one Macs use. Then, do the same thing again, but this time select sRGB. Now, you ...


5

No, you can't expect RGB colors to translate exactly to CMYK for printing. This is a fundamental, simple fact. You can't fight physics -- the physical qualities of light vs. ink on paper. You can't use RGB for printing for the same reason you can't light up a room by holding up a photo of a torch. A torch is fire, giving off light. A photograph or ...


5

It can be said to be an (old) alternative to vector. I have used it for some very old logos and drawings, but more recently in signatures. It is not vectorized, and not anti-aliased, so it needs to have very high resolution in order to not appear pixelated. It can only have one color. If you place a bitmap colored file in InDesign, you can actually change ...


5

This is kind of a history thing, I'm sure the mode is being used in creative ways differently that how I describe, but --- In traditional PostScript-based offset (big printing press) printing the imaging is done in one of two ways (to simplify things) -- As a half-tone where a raster image is broken down into dots and those dots are in a grid with ...


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