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Before editing the photo, use the eyedropper tool and pick the color of a middle-toned, well saturated area. This will be stored in the foreground color swatch. Next do the needed adjustments. Finally, create a new adjustment layer and choose 'Solid Color'. This will create a layer that is uniformly filled with the color you picked at the beginning (...


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Here is a recipe for an action in Photoshop, which works for this exact image (or other images using the same colors and principle). I suspect that the images you want to process have might have other or additional colors or some unknown complexity which could make this method worthless (or at least in need of tweaking). You mention in comments that your ...


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I guess no automate can decide how to construct the wanted original if there's no other facts than used colors - the same result can be got with numerous different layerings. I guess redrawing with layers is not especially pleasant option if the actual image is complex and has a wide palette. But you can try to make selections with the magic wand. It should ...


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In theory you should be able to send a print ready PDF to a print shop near the client and make them print a certified approval which simulates the color profile of the print shop where you are going to make the actual print. The client would have to pick up that print in person though. But since you don't see the physical approval yourself and it's not ...


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I'm able to get a result that's a tiny bit better than yours using mainly Camera Raw Filter. Method for restoring original colors This is the starting point (scaled down to 25% to be able to post it): Start by turning your image into a Smart Object by right-clicking the background layer and choosing Convert to Smart Object. That way the filters are dynamic ...


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Try (RGB) = (73, 152, 255) with 35% opacity. Numbers have base=10. No guarantee, I cannot be sure how close the shown image is to your original. Can easily cause 1 unit errors due roundings. ADD: It's calculated with the well known elementary mix formula. RGB component A in top layer with opacity P and the same color component B as opaque in bottom layer ...


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Just as a basic starting point... I'd take the scan and duplicate the layer and set the duplicate's blending mode to Multiply. Then repeatedly duplicate the duplicate. This will darken everything with each new duplicate. Repeat until you feel you've reached a general medium. Then add a levels adjustment layer to tweak some values, decreasing mid-tones a bit, ...


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I will elaborate a bit based on Wolff's comment. Forget Pantone's values. The reason is that Pantone should be using American Standards, and Fogra, although is used internationally started as a European standard and has different values, for example, TAC. As I do not currently have a copy of Adobe's program on this computer I can not confirm that each ...


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Thanks to the comments under my question and some additional research I was able to figure this out: Yes, it is possible and reasonable to compensate the media white point of a target color profile—but it depends on the case. Since I’m mostly using Adobe InDesign I will describe the solution within that context. The general idea applies to other applications ...


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You can't unfortunately. The colour of the paper will show through the inks. Printer inks as semi-transparent, and anything coloured white is non-printing. I realize you probably don't want to hear this, but this is how printing works. Although you could perhaps tweak the colour balance of images, perhaps by making them a little cooler, you can't escape the ...


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You can not. At least is impossible with some colors. Take for example white color. Printed on colored paper you will totally, totally erase any trace of white. Now take a complementary color, the blue tones more or less opposed to the beige color. They will look darker because some light is absorbed by the paper and some other by the ink. Sort off What you ...


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Your filtering has changed brightness and contrast and inserted a new color here and there. That's already said by others, too. My suggestion: Fix the blueish areas selectively by placing a masked color overlay. At first make a duplicate of the original image. Keep the original in the bottom as a spare. Hopefully it's not needed. Insert a 60% gray layer ...


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All you need to do is scan the images black and white and then apply Gradient Map to them. Gradient Map is bellow the layers (Contrast Icon). There you can first add black and white adjustment layer, then add Gradient Map and choose the colors that you like. You can group these adjustment layers (select and Ctrl+G), then you can paste any picture below them ...


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