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Usually when graphic designer want to check if his print is ok for colorblind people they just change it to grayscale. If there is enough contrast and the message is readable then it's (usually) ok for all kind of colorblindness. I have a "colorblindess" in part of green spectrum. A very dark green is not seen by me as green. On screen it's Black(-ish) and ...


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This is only a comment, but too long to be written as a comment. The causes of color blindness vary. The color selective sensor cells in the eye have color filters which make them able to coarsely make difference between separate wavelengths. The wavelength ranges of the filters are wide and they overlap, but the processing in the brain makes possible to ...


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Ok, you have to understand that color as precieved does not have anything to do with wavelengths. Its true that different spectral spikes make different colors. But that does not mean all same looking colors have same spectral distributions, unlike what quick glance in physics let you believe. Simply CMY colors are the very closely the same wavelengths as ...


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The definition formula of the color difference has evolved radically during the last 50 years. I guess the idea has been to find new versions which more closely present how people see colors. Organization CIE has published their formulas to be used for free. The evolution is described in this Wikipedia article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_difference ...


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It is not possible to copyright a group of colors as far as I'm aware. It's possible to trademark colors as part of "trade dress". However, trademarks are not the same as copyrights. And even if trademarked, you are free to use any color theme outside the industry which any trademark applies. So, unless you are building or advertising a subway/underground, ...


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