Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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According to Joe Scout the first company to use CMYK in printing was Eagle Printing Ink Company and the year was 1906. It was not until 1956 that it became a standard as a result of Pantone trying to streamline the workflow.[1] This however does not really answer who really invented/discovered the choice of colors, the first scientific literature to ...


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My guess is that your document colours are set to grayscale. Go to the colour panel, click the little down-arrow in the top right corner, and change there:


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CMYK is an improvement over CMY which itself is improvement over RYB model, which has been used for centuries (if not millennia). It's really hard to tell where one ends and the other begins, especially as some use words "red" and "blue" in more general sense. Eg. George Field's chart from 1841 lists "red, blue, yellow" but his red in our eyes looks closer ...


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There is no single definable point when the CMYK Process Colour printing was discovered. High fidelity process colour reproduction printing has been a gradual series of technical refinements. The persons responsible are, however, known. Printed colour reproduction grew rapidly in popularity in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries to today, ...


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here is the technical answer Saying that the color is #dd0017 is meaningless, unless it is paired with information about what color space you are using! Therefore also conversion from #dd0017 to CMYK is meaningless. With this off our agenda we can start to look what same would mean in your scenario. When you talk about pure color like #dd0017 you are ...


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In 1906, the Eagle Printing Ink Company incorporated the four-colour wet process inks for the first time. These four colours were cyan, magenta, yellow, and black (also known as key), hence the name CMYK. It was discovered that these four colours can be combined to produce an almost unlimited number of richer, darker tones. Link: http://www.clubink....


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RGB is an additive spectrum... you ADD colors to get white. Dkuntz is correct stating that RGB is light-based. It is. It uses the visible light spectrum to display colors. CMYK is a subtractive spectrum... you REMOVE color to get white. DKuntz's use of the term "color-based theory" is really nonsensical. Since RGB is also a color spectrum. A more ...


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Simply: CMYK is not mixed. A printing process generally do not mix colors. It is kind of the holy grail of printing processes but it does not really exist as of yet. What happens instead is that printing processes layer transparent inks on top of each other. Each ink only being able to produce either full ink color or no ink color. The indeterminate colors ...


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Lab Primer The world is full of magic things, patiently waiting for our senses to grow sharper. (Yeats) Lab, which I often read as Lab but is properly said L-a-b, is amazing. It makes the world a more colorful place. If you've ever taken magic mushrooms, its kinda like that. With Magic Mushrooms subtle color differences can become far more apparent because ...


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TLDR: No, spot colours are not more limited than CMYK, and they aren't treated the same because they are different printing processes. Process printing (or CMYK printing, also sometimes called full-colour printing) uses separate inks. They aren't mixed. The inks are layered onto the paper, usually using halftone dots to build up a pattern of dots to ...


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Set the tool's blend mode to Normal before painting with it.


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Not to detract from Marc's excellent and comprehensive answer, there are some points that are worth a bit more explanation. It's a big subject. This gets geeky before it gets better, so bear with me and follow closely. :) CMYK and RGB are "color models," not color profiles. A color model is a way to represent colors using numbers. There are other models, ...


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Converting to CMYK won't help you unless you find CMYK specific paint, which I'm not sure exists. Commerical paint manufacturers use a variety of non-standardized ways of expressing colour - so try this web based converter: http://www.easyrgb.com This will convert your RGB to a paint colour. That's the free option. If you want to be really picky, you'll ...


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To understand why printers do not use red, green, and blue ink to reproduce color from the light spectrum, you need to research CMYK printing. I'll avoid all the additive/subtractive explanation. Around 1900 a printing company first incorporated cyan, magenta, yellow, and black inks into a printing press to reproduce color. Through that company's research ...


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It's actually far simpler than it may first appear. The bottom line is that it's best to convert to the most native format as early as possible. Full colour printing typically uses four inks to create a photorealistic image. In theory, cyan, magenta and yellow should be enough to print a high quality image, but adding black aids the printing process, giving ...


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Actually, there already exist printing systems which let you choose your colors. In screen or offset printing you can use any existing color to print something. Now lets say we'd choose red, green and blue as printing colors. We'd still have a subtractive color system (If there's more ink on the paper, there will be less light reflected. So the color gets ...


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The browser doesn't really care which format the color is in, performance is negligible. As such, I'll focus on the decision's effects on the developer(s) and the use cases. A lot of developers find HEX values easier to read than RGB or HSL. As such, I tend to use HEX so that the next developer working on the project may have an easier job, even slightly so....


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Introduction To understand this we need to look at the entire system. The system consists of at least 3 parts: the observers brain, light transfer to the eye and the technical system from where it came. Central to part to how light works is in the eye transfer. If we cut corners a bit, so that we can have a discussion at a reasonable length, one can say ...


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Color values are quantized by the bit depth of the format used to store the data. For example, in most standard formats and modern displays there are eight bits per color, per pixel, sometimes referred to as 24-bit True Color. There are 2^8 = 256 levels, which is why RGB colors are typically represented by three values in the range 0 to 255. Unless the ...


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RGB is a color space that can only exist with projected light. It's physically impossible to replicate it on paper, which is a reflected light color space. So no, no printing press can 'print RGB'. At best, prepress RIP software can convert from RGB to CMYK. In fact, this is what most prepress software workflows do. How they convert to CMYK can vary ...


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The title of the article 'Tauba Auerbach’s RGB Colorspace Atlas Depicts Every Color Imaginable' is misleading. As you already said RGB is intended for screen display and not print. It is - as far as I am aware - impossible to faithfully reproduce all RGB colors using offset printing. Even if it was possible to reproduce all RGB colors, no RGB color space ...


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Matching colours between screen and print is a complex and sometimes impossible task. Due to the nature of light (Screens, RGB) versus ink (CMYK, Pantones, etc) and the fact that pretty much every monitor will display the colour slightly differently and print will look different in different lights. This kind of colour management is a job in itself. ...


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Alright a typical printer has 4 cartridges, CMYK. It looks kinda like this with the black cartridge usually a bit larger because it gets used more frequently: If you print on this printer and the image has green in it then its going to put tiny dots on the paper of both Cyan and Yellow in order to make that green. This is what CMYK process is. Pantone and ...


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Although I never heard the term 'pastel colour space', it looks like you're talking about tints, tones and shades of a hue, in HSB colour space. The term you're looking for is shade. The pure hue has S(aturation) and B(rightness) each equal to 100%. Adding any amount of white reduces saturation, while keeping the brightness at 100%, yielding a tint of the ...


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RGB color is for light-producing situations, and is additive, which means that you are adding light of one color to light of another color, resulting in more light and a mixed color. CMYK color is for light-absorbing situations, and is subtractive, which means that you are absorbing light instead of reflecting it, and mixing two pigments results in ...


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RGB is an additive color model using light directly from its source before it is reflected off of an object. In essence, you start in darkness and because you are directly viewing the light source, the wavelengths can be added to each other to create colors. CMYK and 'real life colors' both use a subtractive method to display color. In essence, you begin ...


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Real color is a quite complex subject. In essence color is something that happens somewhere between your cornea and brain. Simplifying this a bit color is what you sense when some photons interact with the three color sensing structures in your eye. Other definitions exist but they fail on many levels. Photons can reach your eye trough many processes. They ...


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Even if I use RGB Colors in inDesign and print the document, I will still get the right colors on the printout Nope. There are 2 primary reasons as to why there is no guarantee that your chosen RGB colors will print the way you want them to. You can't reproduce all of the CMYK colors in RGB space Converting RGB to CMYK isn't an exact process and ...


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This is exactly what the HSB colour model is for. You have almost exactly named the model's variables in your question: Hue is the 'kind' of colour: red, blue, orange, yellow; Saturation is inverse with the amount of white you add to the hue; Brightness is inverse with the amount of black you add. So, to take your example colour of #F2F5F7. you can convert ...


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There's no exact value that says, "this is muted" but "this is not muted." If I were to come up with one on the spot as a general starting point I'd say use the HSB color spectrum and lower your colors S (saturation) to less than 50. Or using your example image all I did was lower the Saturation which brought the S value of all of them down to around 52%: ...


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