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1

A common problem. CMYK print processes cannot produce as bright and colorful looking colors as the usual sRGB screen. Some programs can make usefully accurate predictions on the screen what CMYK printing would produce. Adobe products and CorelDraw have got their position in the industry because that capability. There are some free and low cost alternatives ...


0

Part I. Not answering your question. 1. Please. Do not use any given text color and then throwing a "formula color" to the background. I am going to twist this story because I am only writing it from memory. There was a known painter and some assistant asked the master if his nephew could start as an apprentice in the studio. -- He can start ...


1

There's links above to two great help sites for color-blind purposes, but for eye-pleasing color matching, that's personal preference, not really something you can apply a formula to. Having said that, I do remember back in grade-school art class being taught the "complimentary colors" based on the color wheel and that exact opposite colors are the ...


1

I'm not an Affinity Design user, however in raster image editing generally, you can apply the alpha lock and then fill or paint on a layer with any colour. This will change its colour while protecting the alpha areas in the layer. Obviously, this technique relies on the layer having alpha transparency, and the colour you are trying to change being the only ...


1

If you have inserted yellow to a pixel layer which already had a bitmap image and the yellow partially mixed with other already existing colors you are out of luck. The only ways out are Undo, revert to a backup or redraw the destroyed layer from a start. If the inserted yellow is the only color in the pixel layer and you do not want to repaint that layer ...


1

I'm not a GIMP user, but to me it seems improbable that GIMP would have such a function out of the box. Sure it could be scripted, but if you measure pixel by pixel along a path, you will get all sorts of inconsistencies because of noise and anti-aliasing in the image. Also the measurements would depend a lot on the exact path you draw. The path you have ...


1

Stop trying to do that. There are some contradictions in your premises. If a "normal" screen is ok to you this means that by definition, it fits into the "normal" category. Not extraordinary or abnormal. If "half" of the people do this or that, there is a chance that that is the "norm". have the low blue light effect ...


2

As you notice from the answers you get very different results depending on your definitions, some of which contradict each other. None of the answers are wrong per see. They just depend on different definitions of color and gray. Now, since we do not know anything about your underlying problem it is hard to say. From a color science perspective there really ...


1

Take a look at Colar: it is a huge palette with perceptual adjustments. It seems to fit all your requirements and is a good base for both UI and design/illustration work


2

HSL is the best color space to represent grayness. Grayness can be seen as a distance S (saturation), which is 0.0 if pure gray, and 1.0 if it is the farthest from gray. Measure and perception In the two samples provided I measured (with Photoshop eyedropper): 0 10% 49% and 216 12% 51% which differs a bit from what you claimed, maybe due to a color profile ...


1

Matplotlib Just to add a link to a IMHO quality resource is the article Choosing Colormaps in Matoplotlib from the Python universe. The package is noteworthy for its research for producing free perceptually uniform sequential colormaps (Viridis, Plasma, Inferno); but also for your requirement of 10 categorical colors they have something to say with their ...


1

There is no shortcut, or ability to add a shortcut, which will focus on a field within any panel in Illustrator. You may be able to use scripting to perform your steps.


4

I do agree with the perception of colour already mentioned. There are warm grays and cool grays, but the grayest of all would be a neutral gray. Looking at RGB values, if all 3 numbers are the same, that is neutral gray, such as R109 G109 B109, or R228 G228 B228. If one number is slightly different, it will tone the gray either cool or warm. Looking at HSB ...


4

I can show you one way (out of several) to remove the gray background color from the image, but I'm not sure if the resulting image will work for a shirt print. In RGB, just add a layer on top of the image filled with the same gray color as the image and set the new layer's Blend Mode to Divide. Optionally use a Levels adjustment layer or similar to add some ...


0

If that is all that you have for the logo, good luck. Any printer that you send that to is going to print you a big rectangle and flood white behind it. There's nothing else that they can do. Even if they do try to print white just under the rainbow parts, that file would still print CMYK to make the grey rectangle and show up on the shirt. That's how ...


22

With full credit to @Wolff for these images. As was discussed, grey is 100% relative to lighting, surrounding colors, perception, and the method you are measuring. Take these images for example. The main image actually has no "red" in it at all. If you take an eye dropper and measure any area that looks red, they are all actually shades of grey. ...


9

RGB or actually the saturation in its polar coordinate equivalents is highly nonlinear when one tries to use it as a measure for "how near grey this RGB color seems to be when watched on the screen" It doesn't at all take into the account human color vision, it's purely for controlling the screen electronics. You have knocked your head to that fact....


-3

I recommend reading the material from the article "colors for ui". The article indicates the basic principles for choosing a color palette and the proportions in which a specific color should be used. I think this material will help you!


0

if you use the 'Live Paint Bucket' Tool (k) to fill the areas required you can use the 'Live Paint Selection' Tool (Shift+L) to select an area and cut and paste it into another layer. If you have multiple areas of colour, select one area with Shift+L > Select > Same > Fill Colour, to select all the same coloured areas


0

I think you could split Selected Words Into Characters using a script-as suggested in the comments. Copy that text before you run the script if you want to keep the original text. The Adobe community has a thread about it: (https://community.adobe.com/t5/illustrator/how-to-divide-all-textframes-in-one-character-per-textframe/td-p/3205429?page=1) The script ...


6

The real answer is Re-draw-it the proper way... And charge for it. Shapes made in vectors, elements in groups or layers so they are easily selected. If you keep perpetuating the bad habits of non-professional designers (taking bad quality assets from clients and work on them without correcting them), you will be stuck on this kind of bad results and projects....


1

I found this page looking for a way to mix multiple colours to see what the resulting colour would be. While reading the original question at the top it occurred to me that that could probably be done by averaging out the colour codes for RGB or CMYK but not for Hex due to the alphabetical values. So I gave it a try. The results of my experiment can be seen ...


0

i think you can categorise the actions? that might make it easier to find the action they want to take. also, you might want to look at Snapseed, Google's photo editing app, as an inspiration for how they managed to put so many buttons in one screen.


2

Which one do you prefer ? You are slated with an issue of integrating form and function (aren't we all). From a purely aesthetic viewpoint, I prefer # 3 or # 4. I find # 1 and # 2 to be very distracting with all the different colors- especially the lime green button on # 1- it does not seem to go with that more pastel color palette. The highly contrasting ...


1

As Vincent has already said in his answer, the line is already present in the image. It looks as though it has already been badly edited. However, if you must edit this actual photograph and don't have access to a better unedited photo, then you can make it look a little better. It's not easy, and will take some manual retouching work. I used the Select and ...


0

The jagged line is already in the original image, that shirt has alreay been re/discoloured at least once. My advice would be to find a better source image without the line, preferably one with a distinct colour shirt and then use Select > Colour Range... (in Photoshop, that is) to make a good selection in a few clicks.


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