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It's pretty simple, select color > colorize. Then, in the dialog, next to "Color", you have a colored rectangle. Just click it.<< Except in my Colorize dialog, there's no next to 'Color' and no colored rectangle. All I see to change the color is a slider labeled Hue which doesn't allow a precise color that was, say picked, from somewhere.


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These answers are wrong. You can totally colorize a picture with a reference hexadecimal color code. It's pretty simple, select color > colorize. Then, in the dialog, next to "Color", you have a colored rectangle. Just click it. Then you can enter your hexadecimal code, and you're good to go.


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The object might have a white fill applied to it, making it appear invisible. You can change the view to Outline view in the view menu of illustrator (or by hitting command-Y) – this way you will see all of the existing paths without styling attributes like fill or strokes.


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Technically, it does not disappear, but in fact gets covered with a white fill, probably because some other points in the shape also need to be joined to create a continuos line. There are other unclosed segments in there and Illustrator treats those as separate, overlapping, objects filled with white. Remove the white fill from everything and you're 100% ...


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Try this. Make sure you are working on a copy of the original image, so you don't overwrite the original. Do Filters > Generic > Erode. This will thicken up the black lines a bit. Now scale the image to 265 x 67px Result


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There is nothing you can do in your code to avoid this effect when you scale down the image because it has nothing to do with the code. It simply has to do with the image itself. When you scale down the image, lines get thinner. To avoid this issue, recreate the image at a smaller size with the same thickness. What I recommend most is to convert whole ...


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You can achieve this effect with a Gradient Map adjustment layer. Start with playing with the presets and then customize the gradient stops to achieve the effect you want. Notice how the gradient can easily be inverted by clicking Reverse in the Properties panel.


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You need to make your shape into a closed path, otherwise the fill won't work the way you want it to. In the example below, there is an open path which is filled Select the object using the Select and Transform objects tool F1 Next, select the Bézier tool Shift+F6, and hold it over one of the end nodes. When it turns red, click on it to continue the path ...


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You need to convert the 2 open paths into a single closed path. Select both paths Path -> Combine (Ctrl-K). Now both segments belong to a single path object. Edit nodes (F2). Select (via mouse dragging, etc.) 2 overlapping nodes (the corresponding ents of each path). /Join selected nodes/, which is one of the first options in the node editing toolbar. ...


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A very flexible way to do it: For each color, create a layer group with two layers, the source image at the bottom, and above it a layer filled with the color to extract, set to Multiply mode. Set the groups to Addition mode. If you want to do color shifts, you can move the groups around. You can also edit the layers with the source images and see the ...


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If you have a Greyscale image, click Image > Mode > RGB Choose black as the foreground colour In the Channels panel, deselect the red and alpha channel (if it exists), leaving both the green and blue selected. Do Edit > Fill with FG colour Example


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I think you have to change the flow(right next to opacity icon). Bring it somewhere around 80%. It is seen 11% as default.


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In principle, any single stroke can only have a single colour attribute at any one time. As joining creates one stroke out of two, this is true for the end result. However, a gradient is also a 'colour attribute', and it's possible to cheat using a gradient that has a very sharp turnover. Select your joined stroke; In the toolbox, click the stroke icon so ...


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Unless you want this converted to a vector format (which is probably not that easily doable with a single step, like an image trace in AI), you'll probably do this quicker in Photoshop, but keep it in PNG format - even better if the PNG is transparent. Just open the PNG in Photoshop, select around the text, hit Ctrl+U, tick Colorize, then play with the ...


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Convert your document to grayscale. Press Ctrl / Cmd + A to select all. Press Ctrl / Cmd + C to copy the image to clipboard. Convert your document back to RGB (or CMYK if you prefer). Make a solid color adjustment layer. Select the color you want for the lines. Delete or hide the original image. Alt + left click the layer mask of the solid color layer to ...


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Here's my advice: use color for the elements in your website, in opposite directions of a color wheel, for contrast, but not directly opposed or complementary, and find their additive-averaged color. In case you have chosen complementary colors, this additive-averaged color will have been grey #808080, which is neutral, but not impartial, because it will ...


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A possible work around would be to apply a linear gradient to the stroke, sampling both objects' fill colours for each end stop of the gradient. However the gradient won't move automatically with the diagram connector. You'd need to reposition the gradient each time you moved the objects. Example


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I have no idea how to measure "colorfulness", but we can measure saturation. In fact, you used that word to describe what you need with black and white images scoring low and very saturated images scoring high. Here is the saturation channel of the first image, where you can only see the slight green tint of the histogram on the top-right: And here is ...


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Color harmony should be a visual thing and Adobe has tried to implement a math rule for producing visually harmonic color combinations. That math rule isn't shown as calculation formulas, we can see only the result - tweak one and the rest move. The RGB color system nor it's HSV math presentation aren't models for how we see colors, but how the colors in ...


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