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The set of colours that we need to represent a surface of a single colour under different amounts of illumination.


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Your number example is right in certain case: You work entirely in RGB color system, not with physical paints and "mix 1:1 red and white" means you watch the red color through 50% transparent white. In that case your HSL(0,50,50) is equal with RGB(191,64,64). When that's seen through a half-transparent layer of white RGB(255,255,255), the resulted color is ...


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The short answer is: No, technically color profiles should take care of this. This is a complicated subject, so I will only scratch the surface. There are many more thorough explanations on other questions on this site. The idea behind color management is this: You have a screen which is suitable for design work and which is correctly color calibrated and ...


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Yes, no, it depends. The neverending question... Have you defined your color profiles? Sometimes I do not pick a "more saturated" or "brighter" color than the one rendered with the color profile, but I choose one cleaner, achromatic. Instead of darkening a color with the complementary one I prefer using black... Sometimes. Your color probably could be ...


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Well perhaps. It depends entirely wether you are doing phisically correct blending or not. HSL is just a polar cordinate RGB with the same gamut as said RGB and same nonlinearity of said RGB. If you would normal mix paint in a bucket then the answer is clearly no. As that would require your monitor to be linear and lose ability to show 8bit per channel ...


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Try this. It's simple: There's a new top layer which is filled with a color picked from your goal image. The sample is taken from a mid-bright place. The new top layer has blending mode Hue. If you have the metallic parts as a separate layer, there's no problem to make a selection to delete the unnecessary color and keep the background intact. If your ...


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Some clarifications first. I am aware that CMYK is a Colour Gamut used for Printing @User287001 (btw, this user should put a name behind all that knowledge) already said that it is not a gamut. CMYK is several things. A. It is a Color model, generally speaking using primary subtractive colors to generate an image based on a light substrate. The K is ...


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My tutorial here will likely help you https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W4cl9U9RHUY its for different function but the same will work for you (I know because I just did it to confirm). Basically: Switch to Lab color mode Select a point or two on the one you consider good and since its a different document jot them down Select similar lightness points on your ...


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Ok, stop. You have not mentioned anything about the color profile. My usual example: Take a marker and draw a line on a coated magazine paper, and on a newspaper. The ink value is the same, the color is not. Leave your color as Pantone, the point of Pantone is that tries to be an "absolute color". Define a set of color profiles, for example, Swop2, ...


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This might be a non-answer, but my honest advice for you is: Don't do it this way. As you are realizing, this method is really cumbersome and time consuming. It could be scripted, as @joojaa mentions, but custom scripts shouldn't be necessary for such a common task of matching screen colors to print colors. CMYK colors are not absolute colors. They are a ...


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Make a copy of your RGB colors put it in a folder called colors in document. Use only these colors. You can then drag the symbol swatches form one set over to anothers icon and it overwrites the swatch updating all globally assigned colors. Now in illustrator you can just record an action overwriting one to another. But you could easily just script this ...


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The easiest way is to simply switch to the channels palette, turn all but one of them not visible, and when you decide which you like, delete the other channels and then flatten the image and ensure the mode is correct (RGB or greyscale). However: the black on the tongue looks more like a magic-wand selection; the brick background still has color in it. In ...


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Can you load your new color palette, aply your new styles to an object, load the old Palette, select the object and add the style with create new swatch to the old palette?


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I don't know if this is possible inside Inkscape, but if you open the .gpl file in a text editor it's actually readable and easy to edit. Here is an example: GIMP Palette Name: drawing # 153 153 153 #999999 0 128 0 #008000 211 141 95 #D38D5F 255 0 0 #FF0000 255 127 42 #FF7F2A The first three columns are the RGB values of the colors. The fourth ...


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Set the foreground color to the color you want before implementing the Hue/Saturation adjustment (as an adjustment layer or simply as an adjustment). By default, the moment you click the Colorize option, the dialog box will default to the foreground color. so... Set foreground color Create new Hue/Saturation Adjustment Layer Tick Colorize


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If you expect a kind of automatic color pipe from the foreground color adjustment dialog to your art layers, forget it. Or get some unknown piece of add-on software which does the trick. I guess you actually want a possibility to copy a color for the colorization exactly from the selected foreground color indicator, from another image or to input it ...


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Recent versions of GIMP have non-destructive erasing, to allow use of the anti erase function of the eraser tool. The eraser in GIMP basically edits the alpha channel without erasing the pixel data itself, but software such as MS Paint totally ignores the alpha channel when copying and pasting directly from GIMP. To permanently delete the erased pixel data,...


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A workaround: This is ok if you can accept limited number of colors like in indexed mode. If you convert you image to indexed mode you can have only one kind of transparency which hasn't a slightest hint of the original color.


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Gimp likely is not aware of the capabilities of the receiving end of the copy/paste so it copies what it has. Easy work around: Add a layer below your image Fill with the default background you need Edit>Copy visible


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The basic color wheel has 12 colors: This is the result displaying these 12 colors in a row, adding a darker and two light rows: The same palette modifying the yellow, cyan and magenta brightness to match the tonal values with the other colors: I think following a couple of basic steps as described, you can get a quite approximate palette to the one of ...


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