Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
20

I want to portray myself as a fresh, young but old-school designer that has an appreciation for crisp, clean design, though isn't afraid to go wild. Just my opinion.... take it with a grain of salt. Nothing about picking a font and adjusting the letter spacing reads "isn't afraid to go wild" or even "crisp and clean". To me (someone with a designer's eye) ...


15

As DA01 mentions, having a focal point doesn't necessarily mean the page will be unbalanced. It's good to have at least one focal point in the sense of accentuating the main message(s), for example a call to action. Now, elements can be distributed differently across a design and still be balanced (if you are using a grid, then you start with a certain ...


12

To add a bit of science, here three things that are counter-intuitive but important to know about vision. They explain why viewers navigate visuals by drifting from a focal point, following any natural flow - and why it feels so much more jarring when there isn't a natural flow to follow. Your vision outside of the very centre of what you're focussing on ...


11

In design, this is often viewed as unnecessary ornamentation. Is it necessary? No? Then it's unnecessary. Additional elements should only be added with a purpose. To draw the viewers attention, to make them feel a certain way, to create a composition that makes the information more easily readable, etc. and should never be an end in itself.


10

Simple answer: Curiosity. Some detail; It depends on the composition. @Yisela had some great examples of focal point (and balance) here, I'm going to use one to explain my thoughts on the eye movement. So example: Obviously you focus on the the people in the center immediately. But take a second to notice where you naturally looked next. For me, it ...


9

It's called "Optical center" Basically, the reader’s eye will start in the upper left and move towards the lower right, passing through the optical center (in a country that reads from right to left, reverse things) That's not the actual geometric center. Make 2 lines from corner to corner on a rectangle and the point where the lines meet, and that's the ...


8

You should probably consider establishing upper and lower limits and making the area of concern flash (possibly a red or yellow background with a black line flashing back to the normal waveform) if values go above or below those limits. For example: ETCO2 values above or below baseline (35-45mmHg) HR below 60 (considered bradycardic) or above 120 (...


8

Interesting and very big question. Research with eye-tracking shows that people "take in" a visual object differently. If you have a black-and-white image with one red dot, many people will have great problems afterwards to tell you what else but the red dot was there. However, placing another red dot somewhere will pull the gaze towards that too, and most ...


8

It's unfortunate that Khaled hasn't had a chance to respond here, but I'll give you my typographer response. As a general principle, I would strongly recommend sticking with the typographic conventions of each culture. Distorting letterforms (or choosing unusual typefaces that don't convey the same sense of formality as small caps do in English) is ...


8

I think the genius/expertise in that photo is perspective, not color. The viewer's eye is intentionally drawn right to her torso. The door, the mirror, the feet, the hair, her face, the building, and the billboard all use the middle of her torso as the focal point. Every aspect of that photo makes Ms. Winestead the focal point. The color use between the ...


8

While changing orientation isn't unheard of (indeed, sometimes it can be used to striking affect), it's worth pointing out the full range of options available to you, obvious though they may be: Crop the image to a portrait format. Insert it as a landscape image despite the white space: too much white space is rarely an issue in an aesthetic sense. Insert ...


7

First off: I can only speak for print and general cases, for I have zilch experience with video. Bear with me. I don't think there's hard and fast rules to determine the 'right' amount of fluff. Left-brainers will hate me, but I guess it's one of those things that just has to 'feel' right without being quantifiable. Moreover, there's other factors at work, ...


7

The answer to this question could be a master's thesis, so please consider my answer as an opinion more than a technical answer. Designs, when it comes with ads, posters, book covers, etc., are direct messages wrapped in a design composition. The common elements between all compositions are typography, visual language, scripture language and its direction. ...


7

There are a ton of possibilities, all of which depend upon the actual content. A dark gradient... A light gradient.... Blur and adjust levels ..... Probably my favorite technique... a band of offsetting color with a mask to promote depth.... Or lower the opacity of the color bar... to make it even more dynamic overall... I, personally, dislike using ...


6

Headings (proportinal font) and code blocks (background, mono spaced font) are typographical the simplest and cleanest solution. It will work with small snippets and big (page overflowing) examples: Python print "Hello world!" JavaScript alert('Hello world!'); SQL SET SERVEROUTPUT ON; BEGIN DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('Hello, world!'); END; Headings can ...


6

Seeing the larger picture, so to speak, I think your suggested right-flush design won't work. The name would be buried over on the side, with the bullet points wrapping around it, rendering it either clutter or invisible. If your goal is to make this document a quick reference, then the reader is going to have to work to find the person's name, and the "...


6

The 'F' Pattern There is the well-known effect of the 'F' pattern, where readers will scan the page from top to bottom and left to right, paying more attention to the left than the right, roughly in the shape of an 'F'. This is backed by research and a number of scientific studies. This mainly applies to text heavy pages, with minimal graphical elements. ...


6

Typically, figures are directly referenced in the text or are visual implementation of what is being explained in the text. i.e. "See figure x". Figures are used to better explain through visuals or to increase retention of ideas/concepts being explained within text. They can be "general" figures, such as a "Tips" icon whenever a tip is in the text. ...


5

You could add a border or drop shadow (or both!):


5

The Logo is often on the top because it's better to remember, the first thing you see is the first to remember. If the logo is good enough to stand alone, its irrelevant where the name stands. This could be a benefit, if you can place the name everywhere you can change the place for every format. Beneath or above the Logo on the web and for letters it ...


5

Don't let the grid get you into problems. It's a tool, a means to an end, but it should never govern your work. If it's in the way, ignore it. More concretely: try and determine your outer margins, your leading and your vertical pacing (baseline grid is great for that last one). Then include those margins on each of the tri-fold's six pages separately. Mark ...


5

Rather than critiquing your logo specifically, I think it would be more beneficial to give you some more general advice that can apply to any design. I think this video (Aaron Draplin's logo design workflow) might be enough to get the point across, but the key things you'll want to think about here are: Size. Should some elements of your logo be larger, ...


5

I would need to know a bit more about its usage and functionality to make a better answer, but with the information I have... You could keep it simple by putting the arrows on the circles and using just one line. Something like this:


4

There is no convention and no rule on this. The fact that it's common to have the type below the graphic is partly that it's currently fashionable and partly a design decision based on what the client or the design feels should have prominence. There is only one case where going with what's conventional is actually required in a design, and that's when you ...


4

If you enjoy math, put it to use developing grid and proportion systems. Experiment with various geometries all you like (I hinted at that in this answer). In the end, it comes down to having or developing an eye for the end result but experimenting will help. Try classical systems like pentagons, golden triangles, golden rectangles, circles, etc. Grid ...


4

I'd like to add a Historical answer to this question. In the early days fluff was a solution for a problem. For example in architecture the plastering was invented in order to hide cracks in walls. This became an artform itself and when the technique was good enough and plastering was no longer necessary, plastering became fluff. Therefore fluff is the ...


4

For me, I'd use hanging punctuation. Essentially you ignore the quotes and align to text. The punctuation (quote mark) hangs outside the column edge. This is very common in typesetting and dates back to the Gutenberg bible. Overall hanging punctuation helps the alignment of text appear more solid or uniform.


4

There are MANY ways to achieve a certain task in After Effects and while the above answer will work, there is a much easier approach. Select the layer you want to adjust go to your "Effect" tab select either "Radial Wipe" or "Linear Wipe" (depending on what fade you want) Then just choose the % fade, the angle of the wipe, and the feather Hope this helps. ...


4

Optical correction / compensation In your case, you're speaking to optical centering, but your eyes can perform more adjustments than that, if you let them. This is the complex process of weighting shape, texture, color, visual distortion, etc and compensating for it. Similar to the concept of optical mixing pioneered by the pointillists of the 19th ...


4

Personally I'm not a huge fan of these skill bars. What do they tell you? So you're 5 blocks on PHP. Does that mean you know everything there is to know about PHP? Nobody knows everything about PHP. Does that mean you use it daily? Is 5 the max? I might assume it is but it also might not be. Bars just seem ambiguous. How good you are technically is ...


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