16

This probably doesn't answer your question. Some possible alternatives... Have you considered CSS instead: background: linear-gradient(45deg, #3d667c, #1d283e); Or perhaps you could use the SVG base64 technique (generator tool here): <svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" width="100%" height="100%" viewBox="0 0 1 1" preserveAspectRatio="none"><...


13

MozJPEG is a modernized JPEG encoder, probably the best one you can find. I've made a basic web interface for it. Guetzli specializes in producing high-quality files with nearly imperceptible distortions. It's very, very slow though. JPEGmini is pretty good at recompressing JPEGs to the lowest still-good quality. Adept and imgmin try to automatically adjust ...


13

Everything @Scott said is true but for better understanding of the WHY and even how come RED seems to look worse, I direct you to this information (emphasis mine and edited for flow) JPEG ... is designed for compressing either full-color or gray-scale images of natural, real-world scenes [and] is a lossy compression algorithm... JPEGs are best ...


13

JPEG is not a lossless compression JPEG Compression is considered a lossy compression even when set at 100% quality you loss some quality. That's why for simple graphics such as UI interfaces and backgrounds is generally better to use a lossless format such as PNG. 200kb isn't that big in 2014/2015 While it would be idea to decrease the size of the ...


13

The geeky details (you did not ask for) Some image formats, such as JPG, support Lossy Compression. When a Lossy Compressed image is saved and then rendered back, the image is not 100% exactly as you designed it but just "close" to it, sort of a sketch. Some of the original detail is lost. Since there is no expectation of accuracy, the Lossy Compressed ...


11

Although the question was asked about Adobe Photoshop, the behavior is due to the lossy JPEG format and would be similar with any image editor. Cropping a JPEG can make it less compressible, especially when the x and y offsets of the cropped area are odd numbers. This causes a re-subsampling of the color channels that can make the cropped image more complex ...


11

Lossless cropping of a JPEG image is possible using the "jpegtran" application that comes with libjpeg; see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libjpeg. Quoting from "man jpegtran" on a system where jpegtran is installed: .. lossless crop is restricted by the current JPEG format: the upper left corner of the selected region must fall on an iMCU [8 or 16] ...


10

Here is an article on exactly your problem. Been having this problem as well. Hope this helps! Facebook uses a low quality jpg compression so any solid colors end up looking heavily pixelated. Solution is to add images at double the size with noise.


9

No, GIF for static images is a waste of bandwith. PNG can almost always be much smaller than GIF GIF has a very poor compression algorithm, but has a smaller header. PNG has a few bytes more of overhead for extensible metadata, but has a superior compression algorithm. So the larger the image, the bigger advantage PNG has. Basically only images like 1x1 ...


9

Having the same problem with a white text on a solid red background. My solution was to replace the solid red by a gradient of to reds. Afterwards I also added a Noise filter (or grain filter (7) in the filter gallery) in Photoshop. The improvement was very noticeable and the result was perfect. In attachment you can see the original and the finished result.


6

There are a few ways to reduce the size of a TTF file, but most of them require that you know the consequences, since they are lossy. Firstly, you can subset the font, which means to remove any glyphs (character images) that you don't need. If you have a font that covers several languages and you only need to support one language, then this can be for you. ...


6

From Facebook's help center: How can I make sure that my photos display in the highest possible quality? To avoid compression when you upload your cover photo, make sure the file size is under 100 KB.


6

There is so many methods that reduce your PDF make sure you follow one of it or you may need "in some cases" to follow all of them. some when you export from indesign and some in Acrobat itself as a post production process. you can reduce the PDF by one of the following method. RGB color mode is less in size than CMYK images embeded in the document may be ...


6

A ~620% file size reduction is asking a great deal. It's possible, but I'm not sure what restrictions should be watched, file dimensions? color depth? etc. ^^50k gif file. This is a reduction of the dimensions by 85%, set as a gif with only 32 colors in the color table. As @Ryan points out, if the text and labels were vector in nature it may allow file ...


6

An SVG with an embeded image will always be bigger as the SVG (without embeded raster image) and the original raster image together, because SVG files are text files and have to encode the embeded images as text (base64). In case you made the the raster image smaller in Inkscape you should rescale the original raster image and embed the smaller version ...


5

I'm guessing this is the case actually, no, that's not the case. Animated GIFs are optimized in exactly this way...each frame only contains the parts of the image that actually changed from the previous frame. Wikipedia doesn't go deep into detail, but does mention it here: Some economy of data is possible where a frame need only rewrite a portion of ...


5

FreeVImager can do this with nice GUI. It also can do lossless rotation of JPEGs (90 deg rotations are loseless). It's FOSS, so if you're on Linux, it's worth getting Wine for one.


4

I don't work for Google so I can't speak to their method of sizing & compressing the images, but your image is very noisy which means that any modifications will significantly alter the sharpness of the textures you're using. Noting that their guidelines warn that your graphic "will be downsized to mini or micro", and even in a desktop browser the art ...


4

It's not about image compression but rather the number of HTTP-requests. Sprite sheets are a common developer technique nowadays. You can read an overview of the technique and its benefits here: http://css-tricks.com/css-sprites/


4

Found the answer to this about 20 seconds after posting: just change the matte color:


4

JPG is a lossy compression method. This means every time you save a jpg image data is thrown away in order to save file size (kb). It is important to realize that this loss of data happens each and every time you save a jpg. So if you open a jpg, then save it as a jpg you have thrown away more image data. It is in areas where the data loss has occurred that ...


4

GIMP is quite good in PNG compression, but not the best. To get a basic idea about PNG optimization, read File size and optimization software chapter in "Portable Network Graphics" article on Wikipedia. I have optimized thousands of PNGs and I recommend these tools for a lossless optimization: PNGOUT, ZopfliPNG. If you want to make your files even smaller,...


4

Is that a good idea, in theory? Sure. If yes, is there a program or algorithm that can do the image split and the compression with the following goals: I don't now that you need that. I'd build the image in a program that can handle layers (such as Photoshop). Hide the top layer and export as a highly compressed JPG. Hide the bottom layer and export as ...


4

Blending modes do not translate to PNG images. I would guess that you've se the shadow to Multiply within Photoshop. Your shadows need to be set to Normal for the blending mode. This may mean you need to better mask the shadow layer or remove the shadow entirely and recreate it without the white areas.


4

I guess there are many ways to do this. The effects user120647 posted look like some kind of high compression artifacts, like when an MPG video lose the keyframes. But I guess you can, for example, incremental noise to the image, incremental sharpness, posterizations, etc. So I think you need to explore different stuff. Your option to corrupt as JPG file ...


4

You can corrupt/glitch an image yourself. All you need is a text editor. Open the image in a text editor, such as Notepad++ Scroll down the code a bit to get away from the header code, and copy a few lines of code. Scroll to a different location, highlight a few lines of code, and paste the code you copied, to replace it. Repeat step 3 several times. This ...


3

Various possible reasons: you are re-saving the images at a lower resolution. fewer pixels = less data = smaller file size your camera is likely saving JPGs with minimal compression. Your desktop software is using a higher level of JPG compression. Even if your software is using the SAME compression as your camera, each time you re-save a JPG, you lose data ...


3

Google Play Store wants PNG24 not PNG8 "JPEG or 24-bit PNG (no alpha)" https://support.google.com/googleplay/android-developer/answer/1078870?hl=en auto formatting from PNG8 to 24 can cause issues like that. Try saving as PNG24 :D


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