21

Real world use is not that applicable. Sure they are nice for the designer's eye... but in most use cases an ambigram is less clear and less defining than easy to read text/symbols. Form vs Function. If you can't immediately read what is being represented, then using an ambigram is often contrary to its overall purpose. In many instances ambigrams ...


18

When talking about textmarks the reason is probably: Designers do not usually get to pick the name. Therefore the palindromic/mirror and or rotationally symmetric quality of the logo is up to chance. While you can manipulate the situation a bit, conditions leading to this kind of feature are quite rare. At least if you intend to avoid hard to read ...


16

Something like this should get you started. The key is to imply motion by making the text appear to be trying to go somewhere. and because we read from left to right, make go from left to right. Otherwise it will appear to be moving "backwards". Note: the graphic is awful looking, but it is there to demonstrate a concept.


16

You may find this answer slightly off-topic, but let's look at what the case mixing means in that particular example rather than in general. To get some context, it's helpful to look at the other varieties of peanut butter offered by this brand. In this context, I think it's clear that each design is trying to convey something about the product's taste ...


15

I completely realize this is hypothetical, but that head appears to have been specifically created to correlate to the uterus. It's neither strong nor dominant in my view. I would not be comfortable presenting that animal head as being "strong and dominant". To address the unspoken issue.... I feel that people are always going to see things in your art ...


12

To add a bit of science, here three things that are counter-intuitive but important to know about vision. They explain why viewers navigate visuals by drifting from a focal point, following any natural flow - and why it feels so much more jarring when there isn't a natural flow to follow. Your vision outside of the very centre of what you're focussing on ...


11

You're not alone in this problem - supermarkets and department stores also often need to advertise different products to different audiences in the same space. AFAIK, there are two basic approaches. Choose the first if your brand identity suits all three products, and the second if each product requires a different personality and tone. One brand, ...


11

I happen to have one particular image you may find useful. I didn't create this just happen to have found it and thought it was worth adding to my scrapbook of ideas. Its simple, eloquent, and even humorous while showing 3 distinct products that are, at least in theory, for 3 distinct demographics.


10

Simple answer: Curiosity. Some detail; It depends on the composition. @Yisela had some great examples of focal point (and balance) here, I'm going to use one to explain my thoughts on the eye movement. So example: Obviously you focus on the the people in the center immediately. But take a second to notice where you naturally looked next. For me, it ...


10

I've used a method where the boxes are actually pieces of post-it notes. Today I use cellphone sized ones because they are usually big enough. You can cut them in shape put text on them. But the best function is that you can move them about. Even better your client can move them about. The thing is the mockup stage can not look too finished. People who are ...


9

After researching and researching on the internet I was unable to find any official documentation regarding novelty notes. Yes there are ton of web sites that passingly state, "It's fine if you aren't trying to defraud." But some random web site having this posted with no follow up was not solid enough for me. The closest to an official stance I could find ...


8

Look and feel is a brand thing Your visual decisions should not only be based on information architecture but an essence, a personality that's unique the brand in question. Your first steps should have nothing to do with execution. No type, colors, images, graphics. That will come later as a logical extension of the brand. Start with Demographics Project ...


8

Interesting and very big question. Research with eye-tracking shows that people "take in" a visual object differently. If you have a black-and-white image with one red dot, many people will have great problems afterwards to tell you what else but the red dot was there. However, placing another red dot somewhere will pull the gaze towards that too, and most ...


8

There is not only cultural variation, but there is also variation on a single culture during different time periods. Also, how people are affected by different color stimuli varies from person to person. Some studies find that color can affect mood. However, these studies do not agree on precisely which moods are brought out by which colors. The ...


8

Control reactions with your pitch As a designer you should have a presentation/pitch deck ready to lead your clients through your vision and design choices. That being said if you didn't have one or use something similar to layout where you came from in your designs, you can mitigate the questions by then explaining your process and apologizing for any ...


7

Can I just point out that the use of a combination of both have a long history? They are half-uncials) They were rather common in days of yore. You can see them for example in these kind of fonts: I know of places where people write capital R in a regular handwriting, otherwise consisting of lowercase. This I found in Ireland particularly, and maybe that ...


6

I think it's better to show 3 different concepts but that also depend on your contract and how much time you want to spend on this. With design, I like to say "everything is possible it's just more expensive." So it depends on the budget of the logo, how fast you create and in how much time it needs to be done. If you work as an in-house designer for a ...


6

If you listen to the godfather of corporate logo design, Paul Rand (and really, you should) you show one idea: The arguments for this approach is that the client has hired you based on your existing work. As such, they want your skill set and experience and they should trust your skill set and experience. You, as a trusted, experienced designer should ...


6

Shouldn't all brands have some kind of idea or concept behind their brand identity? Sure. The fallacy here is thinking that there is no concept or idea... There should of course always be an idea, a concept and clear rationalisations for every design decision you make. But that doesn't always have to come across obviously in a finished design. I'm sure a ...


5

Let me answer the question itself - i.e. how to move objects together in Illustrator exactly as you ask. Assume you have this picture, where there are 5 rectangles and 4 direct lines pointing as provided - You want to move the grey rectangle to any other position in the way where all direct lines move simultaneously with the grey rectangle to the new ...


5

I would recommend something like: yEd, used to use this a lot, today not so much. Probably best for simple-moderately complex stuff. Good support for different formats. Gephi, for beautiful big force directed graphs. Tulip, havent used more than once seemed ok graphwiz, I use this all the time and then do final touches in illutrator. It probably produced ...


5

X-wing fighters are cool, but to tell Ford I want a car that looks like an X-wing fighter would be a really ridiculous request, as x-wing fighters aren't designed to be usable cars. So, a client asking for a 'minority report' UI likely isn't providing you with any meaningful requirements. Design needs to be based around a particular objective. So, you need ...


5

Always Listen First.. Ovaryraptor said it well. Controlling your reaction keeps a positive perception of you intact. If you can't tell by the image, it's the opposite gender you're dealing with. This design/layout was completely function oriented and based on the property layout. (it's a stormwater detention pond with a recreation path around it.) At no ...


5

This depends on the type of income and schedule a designer needs to have: employed designers will work as much as the boss says they should work. 8 hours a day generally, like any other job, but that depends on the location and type of projects involved. the boss decides if there's any overtime and the employed designer will probably need to execute ...


5

This question might be somewhat subjective, but I hope it doesn't get closed because it is very relevant. Especially for upcoming designers. I work 8 hours a day. I am employed, but at a cooperative design studio / print shop, so I'm also a co-owner which of course gives me some extra (unpaid) work (and worries). Sometimes a tight deadline or the ...


4

My answer (although not necessarily a solution)... Solutions to creative obstacles often are dependent upon deadlines, at least for me. If I have a tight deadline... I'll follow a bit of what Marc Edwards has answered -- I'll just get something done. Then do it again, then start asking "what if" a great deal. "What if that were blue?" "What if I aligned ...


4

A commonly-used approach to projecting ease-of-use for a product in its logo is to try to project "friendly" and "approachable", often by using a childlike or playful line (less regimented), rounded corners instead of square or sharp corners, bright colours (although often softened somewhat). Compare: To this: Both are by the same designer, but the ...


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