30

If you don't like any, you'd have to pay more This is exactly what you should say. Now, prior to creating the logos, you should have a design briefing meeting with the client, so that the client can give you some direction and you're not just striking out blindly with your three designs. I like to give homework by asking "What are three (sites, logos, ...


19

My response when asked for free consultation.... I'm sorry, [client]. Please understand that my time is valuable. You are essentially asking me to donate my time for your project, even if it is merely in the nature of a consultation. Unfortunately, it would be nearly impossible to try and convey all that I have learned through education, trial and error, ...


18

There are a few options: "Sorry, but I just don't have the time to volunteer for pro-bono work at the moment." That's probably the easiest way to handle it. On the other hand, is there a benefit in trying to make this person happy? Could it benefit you in the long run if she's your friend? Is she well connected? If so, maybe you want to try and keep ...


16

I think most clients will assume price is negotiable and try to lower it ;) Something you can do is offer more than one option per project. This doesn't work in every case, but I've done it a few times and results were good. You make two or three proposals based on features, starting with the most basic one and going up to a super-complete-pack. You list ...


14

I'm assuming you're in the US, and I am not a lawyer. Short answer is that unless you have a contract specifically stipulating that the client gets the copyright when the work is complete, they don't own it, you do. So I think she can't stop you. See also: https://blog.freelancersunion.org/2014/06/06/what-if-client-forbids-you-including-something-your-...


11

I don't think it's overly complicated. You could easily write up something which states they give you permission. You don't need some huge contract or anything. [Your name] has permission to display work created while under the employment of [Company name] for the purpose of a design portfolio. At no time is work be resold, repurposed, or redistributed. ...


9

You never communicate that price is negotiable. Sorry. Its bad sales and marketing strategy. Rule #1 Never speak first. If they like your work then they'll either pay the rate or start negotiations and see how flexible you are. You can and should outline what the rate is for. In a bid you would say that this rate is for this exact work. That gives you ...


7

You could lower your price by a good amount for consulting. This will allow you to get paid for your knowledge. If the money isn't there don't sweat it, move on. Don't ever give design advice to clients that refuse to pay, unless you know she will be coming back to you for more work. If she states she is a very creative person then she does not need any ...


7

I actually have exactly these clauses in my contract. Client agrees to review work within X days of submission by Designer. Designer will endeavor to meet all deadlines set; however, if Client does not review work in a timely manner, Designer is not responsible for missed deadlines. So IF this client is worth doing the work for, AND IF you think you can ...


7

According to my understanding of US Copyright law, (I am not an attorney) the artist owns the rights to all work except under 10 specific instances. Well, 11. The 11th being you agree to give away those rights. The other 10 items deal primarily with being an employee, audio/visual work, work for hire, tests, and parts of a "collection" (such as illustrations ...


7

All 3 of these items are common contract considerations. This info is coming from experience as a designer freelance as well as an agency designer. While not as important during my freelance days (as I had more flexibility to work to the client's schedule), the necessity for approval deadlines in agency work is critical. Because of this, all of our ...


6

Price is ALWAYS negotiable. But there's no advantage or reason that you need to remind anyone of that.


6

I merely provide pricing and then add "If you have any questions or concerns, I'm always happy to to discuss them." If they take that to mean pricing, they can. It doesn't mean I'll alter pricing, but I want clients to feel free to bring up any topic related to the work.


6

You don't want to get into the situation of looking like a mean designer and feel stuck between your client and that person. The way to do this is by cooperating but not in the way she will expect. Simply, do this with a smile: 1) Give her some tutorial suggestions like lynda.com, the Adobe Community forums or some online magazines about design, and tell ...


6

Short answer - Yes. This is what I do and it's very import that the client understands the consequences of missed deadlines. I have had disputes with clients in the past because of missed deadlines that were entirely the client's fault. Because there was no previous agreement, the client is unwilling to take any responsibility and expects the final ...


6

Building off of CAI's answer, you can't just push out the deadline for every delay for a couple of reasons: that does nothing to encourage the client to stick to the agreed upon timeline You're bidding on the contract based on time you know you have available. As such, I'd encourage you to make sure the contract stipulates phases and deadlines for client ...


6

None. Generally you don't charge for royalties on logos, since a sold logo should be free of limitation. When its paid, its paid in full and the company should be free to use it anywhere. Usage limits can be set on specific artwork however, like an illustration, a photograph, a video. After all people invest in logos so they can benefit from it, ...


5

I think the problem is that you conflated the size of the task with the importance of the end result. You probably figured a piece of artwork on a few things was "a small job," so you didn't mind doing it for free. But once he took your work and started using it on everything, now it's "a big job," and it's a big job you didn't get paid for. So now you feel ...


5

Look, you're a designer just starting out, and it sounds like you've shown enough talent to be noticed by a reputable client. You're off to a good start. Let's look at your career path from a long term perspective. As a free-lance designer, you're going to start out not making very much cash, and working hard to advance to bigger and better (and higher ...


5

One way to breakdown and prioritise parts of the service you deliver, as well as leave it clearly open to negotiation, is using a MoSCoW analysis. Basically 'must haves', 'should haves', 'could have if there's time and space in the budget' and finally 'won't have this time but maybe in future'. Just use the must for basic necessities, should for mostly ...


5

The issues with this situation are the "personal favor" approach with your client and that there is nothing in writing. The latter actually benefits you as the creator of the work: When you create artwork of any kind, the copyright law automatically makes you the owner of a copyright of that work. Whether you create it first and sell it later or ...


4

This is a very common problem when it comes to creative or web work. The way I've seen other agencies deal with it, and the way we handle it, is to specify duration of engagement during estimate or bid stage, with disclaimer that work beyond original engagement is billed separately.


4

If you already agreed upon a price with a contract, and said contract doesn't outline any penalties for your client due to them failing to stick with the timeline, it, alas, does mean it will cost you money. Going forward, you need to be a lot more explicit in your contract with this client. I'd suggest the following type of clause: "Estimate is dependent ...


4

Most companies and designers put the contract as an email attachment in the form of a PDF to be signed and returned. This is standard and shouldn't cause the client any worry. This makes sure that both parties have a copy of it. If you happen to be physically near your client, doing it in person is acceptable as well. If there is something non-standard in ...


4

No. As an "employee" everything you create is owned by the company you work for, entirely. Employees are considered to be in a work-for-hire position and retain no rights to anything, regardless of their job description. IF there is some sort of contract, which is not customary in the United States, you should consult the contract. It will have a section ...


4

This could work, if its part of the original arrangement. I've had my share of pieces that failed to get a decent ROI as well. So, if this particular piece is so beautiful and successful, you'd like to have a recurring piece of it, but if other items are not so successful, will you be willing to offer discounts ? I'd say while it does sound tempting to ask ...


3

I usually don't send clients a "contract", but a "project proposal". The proposal includes an explanation of the work I'll do (and not do) for them, the deliverables, what I require from them (technically and content-wise), my fees, terms of payment and other general terms (copyright, source files, what happens if the project is cancelled). In short, it ...


3

There is no standard. Seasoned designers often understand the value of vector files and will often start with the vector format then generate raster format. The resolution independence of vector makes it almost automatically a "given" for a logo. A logo is most often sized and scaled a whole range of sizes. Starting with, or providing vector, just makes ...


3

Chalk it down to "Charitable Giving" In every persons life we have an opportunity to help out charities and not-for-profits. If you believe in the cause, and it sounds like you do as you are giving a large discount, then just go the whole hog for this customer this time and don't stress about it. Some general tips for "Charitable Giving" Though: Set ...


3

If there wasn't a contract, which specifies that you can't put works which you created for her to your portfolio/website, there is no problem. I have a similar problem in my company, which produces a lot of things made of steel. My job is to first create of a 3D model of a prototype, when a new thing is going to the market. Of course, I also have a ...


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