11

The most fundamental fundamental of good typography for long text is that the type should be "invisible" to the reader, so there is nothing to interfere with the communication of information. From that, we get the principles that serif faces and lightweight sans are better long text than regular sans, and dark on light tends to be preferable to light on dark....


7

Readability is all about contrast. I'd try and determine how dark each background color is in greyscale, and if it is above a 50% grey (more dark than light), use white text, below 50% use black text. This will ensure that you have at least a 50% contrast (difference in tone) to make your text readable. This method is a lot easier than trying to play with ...


7

To be honest with you, I don't think there's an actual name for it, as it hasn't been separated into a design trend of it's own. However, looking at the photos you attached, I do notice something in particular: The futuristic design that uses white and black is usually very clean looking and give an impression of evolution. You see, we have to look at a ...


7

I work for a group called Active Living Coalition for Older Adults (alcoa.ca) — we were looking into design issues affecting websites and found this site to be very helpful: http://www.nia.nih.gov. Regarding print, the stronger the contrast the better. For type size, we use 12/14pt for body text, nothing lower (footers/headers, footnotes are 10/12pt). I ...


7

It's hard to have the perfect color and contrast since the background has almost every color possible! But you can add some effects behind your text to light it up or to make it darker, and play with the contrast this way. That lets you also some freedom to use another accent color... Eg. the color of the logo of the business that website is created for. ...


7

There are a ton of possibilities, all of which depend upon the actual content. A dark gradient... A light gradient.... Blur and adjust levels ..... Probably my favorite technique... a band of offsetting color with a mask to promote depth.... Or lower the opacity of the color bar... to make it even more dynamic overall... I, personally, dislike using ...


6

I am not sure you will be able to talk about "highlighting" of information, as it doesn't really define anything by itself. What is a highlighted element? Maybe something that needs to be made clear in comparison to other information. The argument could get too vague. How about you go for readability instead? In the first case, your argument should have to ...


6

Personally, I think you should show several pictures each with a separate hexagon to drive the point home. The advantage is that this is more explicit and leaves less to misunderstanding Image 1: Different hexagons in shape. There are others, I added the middle one to demonstrate one. PS: the problem with your statement is that there are indeed even other ...


6

There are to many factors to account for to give a proper answer. A few variables to adjust for Eyes of the viewer Lighting environment of the viewer Quailty of monitor. Settings of monitor. Browser being used could effect color output as well.


5

The main problem you're having is that both your logo and background are in focus. You need to take the background out of focus; so blur the background image. Also the path/trail in your background image clashes with the white of your logo. Secondly, your logo is a little too obtrusive. Make it a bit smaller to expose more of the background image. Here's ...


5

If you need colors that will contrast well when converted to grayscale you need to use colors with contrasting luminosity levels. The RGB or CMYK color models aren't very good for doing this so you can use another color model to differentiate your colors. You don't necessarily need to convert your document to another color space—In Photoshop's color picker, ...


4

Ah, after some more searching, I found it on my own! It appears I was specifically looking for Munsell chroma, CIELAB LCH's chroma, or UP Lab chroma (all basically attempts to get at the same idea). Unfortunately, converting between sRGB and Munsell chroma is non-trivial and UP Lab chroma copyrighted, but it looks like sRGB -> LCH is not too difficult.


4

When colors (hue) are different, but their lightness/darkness (value) the same, you get this 'visual dissonance' that you see in your example. Right now the red is a slightly darker value than the gray. You need to increase the difference in value between the two hues. You could: lighten the gray darken the red do both Or, probably more practical, create ...


4

Here's a handy splash of science. Your eyes' retinas have receptors for red, green and blue light (cones) as well as receptors for general light levels (rods) Between your eyes and visual cortex, there's a step (the LGN) where colour information is converted into opposing pairs: red:green, blue:yellow, and black:white. Yellow is created in special cases ...


4

For your first question you might want to look into a color wheel, here's an example. Just divide the 360 degrees of the wheel into as many parts as you have required elements and you'll get colors that contrast from each other as much as possible. For example, if you have 3 elements, your colors would be red, blue and lime. As per figures usable in black ...


4

The printer driver is going to do with the image what it wants... What I'd try first in Photoshop is use the Curves tool to adjust the specific dark tones that tend to smudge into each other, that is, you can adjust the brightness of those tones specifically with a limited impact on the rest of the image's colours. Apply the Curves tool as a non-destructive '...


4

This is really a legal matter. Black text on grey may indeed be a highlight. It all depends on the value of grey and other surrounding elements. I doubt you'll find anything specifically stating black on grey is NOT a highlight. In fact, in web design, black on grey is used often to highlight areas. Look here: Bootstrap, a very widely used Twitter ...


4

The W3AC provides standards for web accessibility of text. They require specific contrast ratios so it can be read by color blind individuals. If you know the #hex for your background colors and text colors for your website, it's as easy as inputting them to see if they are AA standards compliant. They can be accessed via Snook Color Contrast Check


4

F) Channel Mixer adjustment layer or adjustment (either one depending on level of destructiveness desired) Tick the Monochrome option -- Allows complete control in my opinion. Whatever the default state of the adjustment is, that is what simply switching to greyscale would produce. With the Channel Mixer you can tweak the channels to see where you need to ...


4

Try using a Levels adjustment layer. You can alter the darks, mids and lights separately. You can also set the opacity or blending mode for this layer independently to tweak the effect even further.


4

To achieve a "high contrast, grainy, almost cool grey-blue look", try following these steps: Choose your image. I chose one of my favorite bouldering pics. Use a couple of adjustment layers. For this look, I used levels and Hue/saturation. Here's how I used levels. Really play around with this adjustment (it's my favorite one). You can take an image from ...


4

I would use pattern to make the stripes, other than that the process is similar to Storm Brewer's addition to the Ashlee Palka method. Sample image, credit goes to @tylerbarnes from Unplash. Create a new document with 1x8 pixel with transparent background. Zoom in and fill the first 4 pixels in white. Go to Edit > Define Pattern... and name it "stripes" ...


4

Text tracking The font tracking is established for its use in text, in case of headlines or oversized text should always be checked individually in each character. Layout structure Beyond the upper and lower unequal spaces (cyan lines), the absence of a structural relationship between the two headlines is notable, this is increased by changing the ...


3

Layout Thoughts This layout may have been fine last decade, but these days it screams amateur. It doesn't take much to rearrange this layout into something neat looking, current, and dynamic. Something that will leave your customers impressed, rather than wondering whether or not to trust your service. Faults in this Design Cold and Dark: For a site like ...


3

Your background is too busy (shapes and colors). Try either blurring it a lot or making it black and white. Maybe also reduce the contrast. Also, on both examples you show, the logos have a very faint shadow. When doing your drop shadow, just don't put any distance so it shows from all sides of the type. Make it big and quite transparent. This should do the ...


3

I'm not exactly sure what you mean by service. MyFonts.com has an open tagging system that gives you a good idea of how others classify a given font. It also has a nice "similar fonts" module on the right side of the page that will help you make connections. If you'd like to know how a font of yours fits into the bigger picture, you could upload it through ...


3

Here my earlier answer to essentially the same question at Game Development Stack Exchange. To summarize, like the other answers here suggest, you should generally use either black or white, depending on which one contrasts better with the background. (Of course, if you like, giving either color a slight tint won't affect the contrast much.) Note that, in ...


3

Your best bet is to add a background color to the menu so it is distinguishable from the rest of the page. However, I would explain to your client that it is important to maintain structured navigation throughout their site, otherwise visitors will be confused by a sudden change. (That is, if some pages use the horizontal navigation and others use the ...


3

A lot of people have researched this in a variety of ways and capacities. Some can be found using Google Scholar. Here are a few excerpts I found that pertain to the question, and their source: 2.2.2. Color and visual attention Among a variety of graphic components on screen, color is one of the powerful components of design. Interface designers ...


3

Summing up the information on the comments, the problem you are having is that your background doesn't allow for much contrast, because it's neither too dark nor too light. Contrast is the difference in visual properties that makes an object (or its representation in an image) distinguishable from other objects and the background. (Source) Ideally, ...


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