26

It's absolutely necessary to attribute any third party graphics that your site utilizes as specified by the license agreement. Just because there might be other sites out there not properly attributing artwork doesn't make it okay at all. If the icon is so "basic" or "minor" that you think it's silly to give attribution, then consider just creating the ...


13

I would always search the site for any attribution requirements or guidelines. In the absence of that, the The Noun Project has some clear and concise instructions for different forms of media that can be reliably used as a guideline: How to Attribute This Icon Digital Attribution Websites - Include the attribution either on the page where ...


9

For a business card, my recommendation would be Use a URL-shortening service to create a short url for the webpage that is hosting the original graphic with full attribution. Use small print on the card to give the short url with the credit. Example: If you have room, you might want to include the creator's name as well as the link. You also might want ...


6

I am going to stick my head out, as I have thought a good deal about this. I am first and foremost concerned with practicalities and decency and what actually is going on and a viable solution. (Obligatory disclaimer: this is my personal opinion and experience. This does not reflect any law, nor does it cover all kinds of permissions given with various ...


6

If your main concern is not wanting to mess up your web design with bylines attached to every graphic, be aware that you generally have some flexibility with how you give attribution. In particular, you may be able to give attribution in HTML comments that don't actually show up on the page. The full legal text of the international version of CC-BY-3.0 ...


6

The material is copyrighted. You can use it under the terms of the CC licence offered, you can negotiate with the copyright owner for a different license. Or find another resource that has a license you're happy with. Or develop your own. Either it's worth doing this right, or it isn't worth doing. Pick one.


5

If the license says it should be attributed, I don't think it should be questionned if it should be attributed or not. These are the conditions and you are free to make your own visual if the conditions are not right for you. Then again, I am fairly sure that in common practice, a lot of people don't bother attributing even when the license requires it which ...


5

I will preface this by saying that I am not a lawyer. I am pretty familiar with font legal/business issues from my decade-plus at Adobe working with their lead font lawyer, and 20 years in the type business in various roles dealing with IP. But that said, these are legal issues, and consulting a lawyer is an excellent idea. One such lawyer who is well known ...


4

You don't typically license a logo at all--as a logo is meant to represent a single entity. However, within the license of the software itself, you may want to add clauses about how the logo can be used (or not used) by others.


4

I am not a lawyer. You should get one, if you are concerned about possible legal issues. Of course, they have. You just cannot grant more rights than you have obtained, so there is no option for you to release a derivative work as a whole¹ to the public domain, or under any free/libre license, or in general any license, that is more permissive than CC-BY-NC....


3

When you want to make your work "free and available" to anyone online you should mention how it is free. It is not a term of use nor a copyright. It is simply "access to knowledge". You have 6 licenses in Creative Commons and all are related to any work not only software. You can choose how to make your work available in specific way. And there is an online ...


3

This is only a partial answer. The rest of the question is addressed very well by Thomas Phinney’s answer Otherwise, if I'm not careful, it sounds like anyone could just copyright my work as their own Copyright does not work like this. If you created something and did not sign any contracts to transfer your copyright, you hold the copyright. If you have ...


3

For web: You could add everything into a humans.txt file located in the site root. Humans.txt is an initiative for knowing the people behind a website which contains information about the different people who have contributed to building the website or content used. If you want to know more about the humans.txt you can reference humans.org. An example ...


2

I would say that in the code is only a valid place if IT IS code. For images I would when possible credit as close to the image as possible. If not possible (such as in your question) then probably creating either an About Page or License page that you could add to your footer. site design / logo © 2014 boblet inc; additional content licensed under cc by-...


2

Edit: this question has been edited after it was posted, but originally suggested that "historical people" are themselves copyrightable. You should ask your lawyer for legal advice. People are generally not copyrightable, although characters in a work of literature or art might be. It's work done by people which is copyrightable. Things such as works of ...


1

No. Just ask Shepard Fairey Photos are copyrighted. Using a photo as a basis for new work is derivative work and an infringement on existing copyrights. There's no such thing as "edit an image by x amount and it's okay". If any part is recognizably the same compared to the original, in may be considered infringement. Be aware, just because others may ...


1

Just because a person was alive a long time ago, does not mean that the images of that person, or images of their artwork is not under a copyright. The best thing to do is to do a search for images licensed under Creative Commons with usage that matches what you need to do with the image (i.e. commercial or non-commercial). Two sites that I use ...


1

No. Your website can be considered a 'medium through which you share the image', so you can use and share the image, while not sharing your own code. But you DO have to share the image, and share any modifications you make to it. So if you're using a forest photo and stylize it or draw creatures in, you MUST allow other to use that image. And of course, you ...


1

No. CC0 (and its equivalents) is the closest "moral equivalent" to public domain; it says, essentially, that the work is licensed for all uses with no restrictions or qualifications, other than that the author of the work still holds copyright in those jurisdictions where voluntary alienation (release into the public domain) is legally impossible. ...


1

Regarding Creative Commons (the most usual license of the kind for graphic assets), you can add any icons or graphics that allow commercial use. For example, a Creative Commons license that is NOT NonCommercial is allowed for paid software. You generally (almost always) need to attribute the author, but using CC graphics doesn't necessarily mean you need ...


1

Here's a question/possible solution: Everything that is prepared for print has a digital version, so would it not suffice to include full attribution in the metadata of the digital image? This would not only ensure that the attribution is complete, but that it will follow the image wherever it goes, even if someone crops the attribution off of it. Who ...


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