17

Start by drawing a circle using the Circle tool, whilst holding down Ctrl Turn on "Snap to object centre" & "Snap to rotation centre" and create guides that snap to the centre of the circle With the circle tool and circle still selected, you can calculate the arc length you desire by expressing it as a percentage fraction X 360. i.e. (25/100)*360 can be ...


14

Edit III: I found an imensly gorgeous example of multivariable quantitative data visualisation, and had to add it. You will find it under the heading "Edit III (Nobel laureates)". Edit II: there has been a little misunderstanding, and I have edited to try to clarify how I interpret the intended use of the data. I have replaced two images and added a section ...


11

Put this into a file called CircularLinegraph.eps. You can then open it in any editor that understand EPS like illustrator, ghostscript, TEX, etc. %!PS-Adobe-3.0 EPSF-3.0 %%BoundingBox: 0 0 200 200 %%Title: Circular Linegraph demo for faisal %%Creator: Janne Ojala %%CreationDate: 2016-11-29 %%EndComments /demodata1 [ 10.17 8.80 10.0 9.50 9.00 6.00 7.50 8....


10

If you, the creator, is unsure, how will the reader know which it is? Short answer: the value should be linked 1:1 to the amount of colour on the page. So in your example, it should be area. But there's more than that: you also need to avoid misleading cues that might make a reader read it incorrectly, and you need to know why you're using area instead of ...


9

Your progress bar idea will work, but you need to find two characters with the same width: one filled, one blank. There are sites, like this one, that may give you some ideas for what characters you could use. You can also just look at Unicode character lists and find a pair yourself (this may take some trial and error). On the Wikipedia pages for ...


8

The cool way There's a font for this called FF Chartwell (no affiliation), which I have personally used for different annual reports and white papers. All the data is editable as numbers via the Story editor in InDesign, as the presentation video shows. Each of the styles below sells as a separate font for about 20$. What you probably need is the 'FF ...


8

This type of graph is called a 'Waterfall Plot' It can be used to plot arbitrary data in three axes (as in your example), but it is most commonly used to plot the results of a time-frequency analysis. You mention waves/waveforms so I'm guessing you are interested in time-frequency analysis. Here is an example process to produce a waterfall plot of an audio ...


7

ColorBrewer is an amazing tool that does just that. It's aimed at cartographers, support up to 12 colors, and has some nice options as well (such as the ability to generate colorblind-safe color sets)


7

It all depends on the actual use; who uses it to what aim. There are a million alternatives, and what you must bear in mind is what data is ok to be approximately right and what parts need to be exactly right. You could call this the granularity of the data. How the data is fed is of course also a consideration. But mainly: what needs to be how detailed to ...


7

Well that image isn't very hard to draw*. But that seems to me a bit premature. I would first start by answering following questions: Would you know how to draw that by hand. If yes then use a vector drawing application. Like Inkscape or Illustrator, or even something like vectorpaint. This is not much beyond lesson 3 into isometric drawing. Do you know ...


7

If you're not afraid of coding you can do this with Python: import gtk.gdk w = gtk.gdk.get_default_root_window() sz = w.get_size() print "The size of the window is %d x %d" % sz pb = gtk.gdk.Pixbuf(gtk.gdk.COLORSPACE_RGB,False,8,sz[0],sz[1]) pb = pb.get_from_drawable(w,w.get_colormap(),0,0,0,0,sz[0],sz[1]) if (pb != None): pb.save("screenshot.png","png"...


6

With Gimp: Step 1 with Blend tool: Mode: Normal (default) Gradient: Full saturation spectrum CW Shape: Conical (asym) Drag horizontally from center. Step 2 with Blend tool too: Mode: Multiply Gradient: FG to BG (RGB) (this assumes your foreground color is still the default Black, and the background still the default White) Shape: Radial Drag from ...


6

It is called a Radar chart (wikipedia) although thats not necessarily super well known or a high consensus name. Thus people have come with different names over time. I've seen it called a spider web chart and polar chart, both which may be appropriate descriptions, although wikipedia lists even more names if none of those seem appropriate to you.


5

I think there are a few additional questions that could narrow your search for the key to representing data to your audience. I think of them much like curtailing your resume to a specific job you want. Why are you creating a infographic. What is the net goal or outcome you want your audience to know about your data. What do you know about your audience ...


5

TL;DR? Scroll down for the examples. This is an interesting question. A very complex case that I can only really suggest general ideas for without being on the inside, fully in the know. It's immediately clear that you'll need to use many indicators in tandem to communicate all of the different levels and aspects of data in an easily consumable way. The ...


5

I'd say the area. Optically, a square with a side two times as long shows as an area 4 times as big. Casual observers will relate to the area, even without reading your legend. A nice example is this legendary graph by xkcd's Randall Munroe: (huge, legible version)


5

My option regarding the free software is pretty simple. For a real 3D model Blender https://www.blender.org/ For the anotations Inkscape https://inkscape.org/ You also could use for example Sketchup* https://www.sketchup.com to generate a 3D model to be used as a reference, (and then manually drawn in Inkscape), but Blender have some options to export to ...


5

%!PS-Adobe-3.0 EPSF-3.0 %%BoundingBox: 0 0 400 400 %%Title: Isometric Graph Drawing %%Creator: Janne Ojala %%CreationDate: 2019-04-17 %%EndComments /up {dup translate} def /down {neg up} def /isometric-bottom {[30 cos 30 sin 150 cos 150 sin 0 0] concat } def /isometric-back {[30 cos 30 sin 90 cos 90 sin 0 0] concat } def /c {newpath 1 0 360 arc closepath ...


4

When working with items which all must be 100% and the same color I look at the things which make the items distinctive: size (including widths of strokes) style (dashes, dots, etc) fill (hollow, solid, patterns) shape Then it's a matter of how I can adjust these four settings to create enough distinction between items so they are visibly different. The ...


4

It's all about the contrast my friend. It basically comes down to being able to contrast colors using hue, saturation and tint/shade, or hsl. Here is a nice way to experiment with colors: http://colorschemedesigner.com/ and here is a decent explanation of different ways to produce contrast in colors: http://www.colorsontheweb.com/colorcontrasts.asp on the ...


4

In my opinion the area (D), not each side (E). If you are using a side of length 2, then the area would be 4 times the value and you would have a very overlapped graph. (E) When you have a normal bar graph (A), the data is linear, and the with of the bar is just for esthetic. (B) In those cases the area again is representative of the data because the ...


4

We're not as good at judging differences in area as we are in length. We use length as a proxy and therefore tend to underestimate differences in areas. For this reason, a circle that actually has 2x the area of another appears too small because our brain is relating their radii, which differ by a factor of 1.4x. There's are interesting attempts at ...


4

Doing this is pretty simple. All you need is: A data file in a CSV form with names and values. Each region shape to be filled annotated by the name. Then all you do is a loop over each column, although you may want 2 loops if you want to normalize data ranges. Here is the final result of a tutorial that I prepared for students in my university: #target ...


4

A little late to this party, but in my neck of the woods, it is called a plotband.


4

Scaling law The name in its original publication from WIRED magazine The scaling-law definition according to sciencedirect.com Scaling laws are relations between physical quantities in which all the physical quantities appear in terms of powers, whereby a power of x is expressed in the form xα where α is a real number. and The scaling laws for 2D ...


3

Particle System My approach would be using a particle generator. But the only ones I know are for 3D images. So I would use Blender, where you can define the number of particles. As you need to change the color of some of them I would create two base objects (an object is the shape of the particle that will be repeated) to make two particle systems. One ...


3

Type designer Hermann Zapf created a typeface specifically for this purpose: AMS Euler. I guess it is both easily comprehensible and readable, if it is also beautiful to look at, you will have to decide for yourself. Read more about it on the Wikipedia article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AMS_Euler


3

You can do this with excel, atleast if you approximate the design a bit. Excell is probably the only tool that a unspecified random crowd can be expected to be able to use. The real problem is that the more easy to use, and the more mainstream you want to go the more you need to sacrafice out of your design. Excel can be made quite faithfull to your idea ...


3

This is not a trivial problem; I am only going to give some general suggestions. My graphics are conceptional, would need some elegantifying to be optimal. First: kudos for making the mesh in the background light-light grey. People often overdo that. Do not underestimate the use of a few different diagrams to demonstrate the same data! When people ...


3

What you are asking for can be accomplished by many 3D rendering programs (Cinema 4D, Maya, etc). The free one among them is called Blender. Unfortunately, there is a learning curve to using this program and you will probably invest significantly more time than a 2D Network map, but it might be what you are looking for. I agree though, this form is a lot ...


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