42

Eye movement Regardless of whether a language employs left-to-right or right-to-left reading, in order for a word, any word, to be comprehended easily you can't ask the reader to "zig zag" mid-word. While I would have never deciphered the actual name from this mark... once I know it's supposed to be "dahua", it's clear the designer is ...


23

I somewhat disagree with the existing answers and think the fundamental problems are these: The d has lost too many properties fundamental to a d and the Latin alphabet in general: The bowl is too big and too thin in comparison to the stem. Usually, strokes going in the same direction should have the same width. The bowl goes below the baseline – which is ...


11

The main aspect of this logo that confused me is the similarity of the first symbol to an at sign. For example, look at the logo compared to the primary image on the Wikipedia page for an at sign: vs This similarity led me to consider the names Athua, Atlhua, and Alhua. However, the name Dahua never crossed my mind. Additionally, if I had previously been ...


11

Personally, I feel the major fail is not fully comprehending the western left to right reading bias. Left to right reading is a stronger influence than 'read the red letter first, then the black ones'. So, reading left to right you get… an a in a circle, followed by a red j, then hua. Breaking the circle where technology is written reinforces the j over l ...


10

I. Normally, a drawing program will send the data to a printer as you expected in this case. The printer will not care about the blue rectangle below the triangle. II. A printer does not have "access to the layers" because the drawing program sends only the result the user is expecting, regardless of if you have a ton of layers below. The program ...


8

Some things are concrete in design discussions, but it definitely requires you control the conversation. Design success is not arbitrary. There are principles (Balance, Contrast, Emphasis, Pattern, Unity, Movement, and Rhythm) that can be objectively discussed. These are neutral terms, so maybe you do or don't want Movement or Pattern, for example. These ...


5

This is something I think most designers experience at some point in their career. It's a bit more prevalent when you are just starting out, partly due to the lack of any track record regarding experience and partly due to the types of companies which often hire right out of school. "I don't want to explain to people why you shouldn't..." How do ...


4

Does it make you think? Remember it a bit longer than something else? Will you remember the Ogilvy name? There's the purpose/significance entirely. It's merely a self promotion piece designed to "stick" in your brain as much as possible. It doesn't have to make any immediate sense or have a clear, concise, message. In fact, it works better if you ...


4

Try a polygon model of a revolution surface. The next example of that idea has low polygon count to keep the image sparse: As a wireframe it's this: It's turned to vertical position, the projection is parallel (=no perspective), the view was saved as PDF, opened in Illustrator and all horizontal and vertical lines are manually deleted: This has nothing ...


3

The way the applications work is that they try, and succeed to most extent, to make a what you see is what you get environment. So anthing you put on top knocks out the thing below (I am ignoring transparency for purposes of this discussion just because its confusing but it knocks thing out too). So your yellow triangle neatly cut out the blue bakground. ...


2

There exist relatively common graphical representations that frequently have rotated vertical text. These are called technical drawings. The standard here states that vertical text is always rotated like your first example. Another example happens in book spines that are typically rotated in the opposite direction. I couldnt find any scientific evidence that ...


2

What is the significance/importance/use/purpose/need of this design? What is it? I see this as simply an advertisement. It is this company, Ogilvy, putting their name out there- for familiarity, for name recognition. In your view, this is a bad design or a mistake. This is merely your "opinion"- which you are fully entitled to. I happen to like ...


2

This can be interpreted in different ways, but it is by no means a “mistake”. If you dig deeper, you'll find this is part of their 'visual language', which they use to decorate their communication. https://www.instagram.com/ogilvy https://twitter.com/ogilvyconsult https://www.marklives.com/2018/06/ogilvy-announces-new-brand-identity Given the context of ...


2

If this was my client, I would just get an assistant to do it and charge for it. If I had some other clients, I would also probably consider dumping this one. If this was my employer, I would seriously ask myself how I ended up in that situation and for how long I'll be able to blindly execute this non-design job. Maybe it was exactly this that they were ...


1

Brand Design: The imagery used to identify a brand.... a la logo, mastheads, stationary, packaging, vehicle wraps, signage, uniforms, etc. Essentially anything which has the primary purpose of identifying the item as coming from the same entity. Corporate Design: In terms of "graphic design", this is merely a style of design. "Corporate" ...


1

It can be tested. Check what score it gets


1

Not sure I understand... every medium will have it's own general rules or guidelines, but all should fall under the umbrella of brand guidelines. Brand guidelines typically encompass the broad scope of the visuals - typefaces, colors, logo usage, etc. However, each and every medium or delivery method may then have its own set of general guidelines (sizes, ...


1

There are no specific, valid-for-anything, rules when designing, but in your particular case it feels like some more whitespace is needed (which you seem to be anticipating yourself). So try: more space in between list entries (car, tree, etc) more space above car, and identical value below soup shift the entire list and header to the right, touching the ...


1

I would suggest those that read from top to bottom are probably more common, as book spines follow this rule here in the UK (in Enlgish). I don't know if that's the same in all languages. However, the example with the "We are England Cricket" text is absolutely horrible, and I can't see any reason for having the text run vertically at all. I have ...


1

It's exceptionally rare that I'll set any text in a rotated fashion such as these. But it does happen from time to time. I, personally, pay attention to the flow of the eye. I would never use any rotated text which causes the eye to move downward when reading it. An upward movement is always percieved as more favorable. I suppose if you want to promote a ...


1

Things are generally not so "cut and dry". Eye movement is the primary thing to be aware of.. and without content it's not very easy to comment on how an eye would move across something merely because of varied tonal regions. The only possible definitive is that reverse type is often more difficult to read. In general, the eye is attracted to ...


1

I've always found the golden ratio shape 1:1.6 ugly and hard to produce pleasing composition in. The long side is too big relative to the short side. On its side it's too wide, compositions lose impact. Vertically it's too tall and too narrow. I prefer squarer compositions like 4:3 or 5:4.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible