30

Ethically and morally..... using any "contest" is merely taking advantage of designers. Contest do nothing but take advantage of designers and give all the benefit to the person running the contest. It essentially amounts to "slave labor" of a sort. All designers should adamantly avoid "contest" settings. However, if a designer freely agrees to being taken ...


22

I would let it go 100%. Answer all their questions and put a deadline date after which you are no longer taking requests. I will gladly help with this information, but you need to take over internally asap. They will figure things out sooner than you'd expect. I had a client like this. Similar story. Worked for about 8 years on pretty much everything ...


21

Your customers don't have to understand your name. Your customers don't have to understand your logo. Your customers do have to remember both. To make it easier to remember you'll typically make a logo that relates to the name. The most important thing though is that its memorable. Any reasoning behind it quite honestly doesn't matter. A mentor of mine ...


20

Graphic designers work in all shapes and sizes of companies selling all types of product and services. There's no field which is not suited for a graphic designer if the company markets anything to customers or clients, in any visual manner, in any medium. As for "personal and professional growth"... that can't really be answered by anyone other than you. ...


16

I wouldn't give them or any client really anything if its one of your sources. "Thank you for your inquiry. My sources and vendors are part of the value I bring through my X years of experience. Just as you have your sources for Y and Z (whatever they do) and wouldn't want to be disclosing that. I cannot provide you with this information as it will cause ...


14

Picasso was touring an elementary school and viewing the artwork the children had on display. He was amazed at how good it all was. He asked the teacher... "What are you teaching these children such that they are all fantastic artists?" To which, the teacher replied, "I simply know when to take things away from them." At some point, ...


11

No, it is not right. Use what you paid for and make sure all the other contestants you are taking inspiration from are compensated. These authors own their work unless/until you buy it. If you can only afford one winning proposal, then that's what you should be using.


10

I realized that it is OK to take inspiration from others work, but what I have done is illegal and immoral because I used lots of design ideas from other contestants. The correct way is to ask for permission from those creators, and pay them the mutually-agreed-upon price if they give permission. But, I didn't have financial means to pay them. So, I was ...


10

tl:dr; Don't hold back on information that is not specifically yours, but let them do the leg work since they're not your client anymore. If you want to be non-confrontational, I would definitely try to deflect as much as possible so that you don't seem like the bad guy. There are a couple of things here: Source files Other than branding material (various ...


10

I'm the “get off my lawn” type. You get nothing by default and I carry pocket sand. Old design artifacts – in one batch, once, for free. By old, I mean shipped before. This is a professional courtesy and a test of your professional backup system – if it’s hard to produce these there is a structural defect in how you run your company, very much worth fixing....


8

The good news is your question is almost bizarre: Yes, beauty and fashion is - of course - one of the major and most lucrative fields of Graphic Design. For example ... of the many well-known designers I'm either friends with or work with frequently, the most successful one indeed focusses on .. beauty and fashion! (You mention "skin care" specifically - ...


8

Yes But being creative or artistic does not necessarily mean "ability to draw". Creativity is a must-have. A good designer needs to be able to imagine/see information in various constructs, envision color usage, often determine imagery to be used. All this takes creative thinking. While you generally don't have to be creative enough to come up with ...


8

Animation is not generally considered to be graphic design. It is a totally separate field. Although lately it has become more common to see animation coming out of graphic designers. Using blender is almost certainly not graphic design in general. But that does not stop a graphic designer to use it if they want to. Most of the other things you mention ...


7

When in doubt, ask for references or provide references (actual photos of existing 'mascot' logos, think Michelin, Jaguar, WWF, etc), to help yourself and the client identify the type of work needed, then figure out if that's something you can actually do. This is the typical case of a vague briefing that only reveals itself in full after the terms (...


6

Probably not going to hurt you, skin care is just like any other field and you can build a relevant portfolio taking this job. Time will tell if this job helps your career or not. Also, ask yourself this: why has the previous designer quit? do you have any better career opportunities at the moment?


6

Everything you list would indeed fall under the blanket term "Graphic Design" in my opinion. Animation is to graphic design what web development is to graphic design or what 3D modeling is to graphic design. In that, yes some designers may be adept and perform those tasks, but they are not inherently seen as part of a graphic designer's skill set. Most in ...


6

I use both. If I place my original designs front and center and accompany it with stock image "filler", can I still call it my own? The design? Absolutely! Simply not the artwork. You don't honestly think the guy building that "climbing" web site can go out and take photos of Mt Everest because the client wants a photo, not a drawing do you? There are ...


5

There are different names. Probably the most common one nowadays is creative developer because often times agencies these days will not only be creating things for the web but also installations, apps, VR/AR experiences, and so forth. I specialize in web animation and just call myself a frontend developer most of the time. Over time you'll come to learn ...


5

You must be using the Transform Each function or rotating each piece one at a time. Singular rotations on independent objects are based upon that object's center. Because the center of the objects are in different locations, the spacing will change if you rotate things one at a time (or use Transform Each). There's no need to group anything. However, you ...


5

Creative, yes. Almost any job in the world needs some kind of creative input. Artistic, not necessarily. Depends on what you're designing and what time you have available. You can't be artistic in 5 minutes. There's many designers out there that are creative, but not artistic. You could, in a way, say that illustrators generally tend to be more artistic ...


5

Overall, I never really overly worry about offending clients, especially newer clients, with respect to the work. (On a personal level of course I try not to offend :)) If I have issues with a project, present them, and the client ignores them or chooses not to use me, that's their loss. There are a ton of clients out there who will pay for my services... I ...


4

There are a lot of good answers here. I would add a couple of other points for consideration that might be useful for future relationships (I've been a self-employed developer/designer for ~20 years). It's perfectly valid (I think), to call a print-shop and say "Hey, what stock did you print our cards on last time?". Asking you for things like that only ...


4

Yes, customers need to understand a logo, especially with a new first-contact, never-seen-this-before logo. They will — in time — recognize it after seeing it repeatedly, but it still needs to make sense for anyone looking at it for the first time. Some possible reactions looking at your "idea": is this really a "b"? does it look like a "ten"? where's the "...


4

Okay I'll supply my short, image free, answer ... :) No, it is not inherently bad if the underlying meaning of any logo is not picked up on in a conscious manner. Logos don't have to consciously convey anything... it's all about subconscious interpretation. As long as the impression the logo makes is favorable, it makes absolutely no difference that ...


4

I find myself in a similar situation, but don't think there's a problem with that. Most stock items I use are: Photos of things or places that would be impossible for me to photograph directly or in a time-effective way. Like, I've never been to Chicago, but did use a ton of stock Chicago pictures in high resolution. Basically, if the client doesn't have ...


4

Tricky situation. I would personally dump the client right away, because it already sounds like the boss wants that impossible thing done, and you may get caught in this boss-employee situation. Also, their need to replicate something else from another brand is a clear indication they don't have a specific style of their own, and just base decisions on ...


4

If you can bill the work without creating some drama situation, do it. Some clients have no idea (=absolute zero) of what they need, so they will first collect ideas from some people, and only then what they want or don't want starts to make sense to them. If this client went to somebody else to get the job done after you proposed something that worked in ...


4

If you display content on the internet.. then you are open to comments on the internet. It is neither unethical nor immoral for someone to dislike what you've created or to be insulting towards it. People are allowed to have their opinion. If you don't like it, don't post stuff on the internet. I can't tell you how to respond to anything. That's up to you.. ...


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