New answers tagged

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YES THERE IS A SOLUTION If you want to collaborate with the UI/UX designer(S), i would STRONGLY suggest that you guys start using Adobe XD Its a FREE wireframing software from Adobe and by using it you guys will have visual ideas of what the app or website should look like and perform like. Have a look into it and see if it works for your team.


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Any kind of training related to anything design related and especially digital design is going to be beneficial in the immediate future. Even with a coding job, you'll have an edge with some basic understanding of design. That won't necessarily mean being an artist as in drawing stuff, but you know like making design decisions, structuring information in ...


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Yes and no, and this answer is going to be wildly unpopular but bear with me. I feel that its really the other way around*. It all depends on what you mean by creative. If you would have asked me this question 5 years ago I would have answered no. Today i have to sadly answer yes but not because of the reason most people think but basically having worked in ...


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Yes But being creative or artistic does not necessarily mean "ability to draw". Creativity is a must-have. A good designer needs to be able to imagine/see information in various constructs, envision color usage, often determine imagery to be used. All this takes creative thinking. While you generally don't have to be creative enough to come up with earth-...


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Creative, yes. Almost any job in the world needs some kind of creative input. Artistic, not necessarily. Depends on what you're designing and what time you have available. You can't be artistic in 5 minutes. There's many designers out there that are creative, but not artistic. You could, in a way, say that illustrators generally tend to be more artistic ...


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It's all really personal preference and design aesthetic.. there are no rules. I'd use the logo as the basis for spacing... The logo is used to determine the hight of the hashtag. Then the size of the hashtag is rotated 90° to determine position of the text. This would be my preferred configuration. Hashtags do not have to be "big". If it's readable, it'...


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Every designer has his/her own methods, but generally yes I'd say go with whatever looks good. I personally don't believe in rules much and design things to just look well spaced out, unless there's a very specific branding guidelines document to follow. In your particular case, it looks like there's plenty of space at the top of the banner, so why not ...


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NOT all the Material icons are available on GitHub. Only the Regular Material Icon font is available. The Outlined, Round, Sharp, and Two-Tone fonts are NOT available. These fonts can be referenced, per the documentation. However, Google has not made these fonts available for download in order to self-host them. Also, the Regular Material icon font appears ...


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The good part about graphic design is that you can typically find all sorts of different types of work to fit your needs. I won't bother adding stuff that's already been provided by other answers. One interesting job case that stands out from the lot is working as a news broadcast graphic designer. Depending on the day's events, you could go from twiddling ...


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Any piece I use in my portfolio is used as it was delivered to the client. While I've been fortunate the last few years and have had considerable control over client revisions and changes, it's common practice for many clients to alter work later. Especially web work. When showing my portfolio, I simply explain all pieces are as delivered to clients and ...


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Many times clients will take work and turn it upside down internally. This may happen the next day, or after 6 months and when it does, its generally their decision and nothing to do with what you delivered 6 months ago. Presumably, having paid for the work, they own the work, so they can do anything to it, with or without asking for your opinion. I'd just ...


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Ask your client how they'd like to proceed: You can hand art (PDF, usually) either directly to client or directly to printer. Or you can suggest that you coordinate the printing on your client's behalf, either for a fixed fee or an agreed hourly rate. A written agreement should better define the services offered, such as securing competitive quotations, ...


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Your portfolio showcases your best work, even if it's not ultimately used by your client. Some portfolio reviewers insist that work shown be client work, not simply speculative or personal exploration. I favor showing your best regardless of source, as this is what demonstrates your capabilities. If a person asks 'is this the design used by your client?' ...


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Required?.... no. Can you?.... if you want to. You can either subcontract printing services and then mark up the costs and pass them on to your clients. This makes you responsible for paying all printing costs regardless of whether your client pays you or not. You can offset the risk by requiring deposits on printing services. This means you can profit a ...


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There's no general rule saying you should or should not include a printing service. However, i'd say most independent designers will not deliver prints for clients. They can sometimes recommend a specific print provider, but rarely get involved in the actual printing process. That's mainly because a designer's job is usually to deliver that print-ready PDF,...


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