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4

To my knowledge, these things are often done manually, and a double face tape "gun" will be used to apply the glue. So it's not always glue but a tape that is used. The glue usually goes on the smaller flaps because it's easier to measure its length and ensure it won't be visible at all. Most printers prefer that flap to be at least 5/8" (0.625") since the ...


4

Bleeds do not have to follow shapes exactly. They simply need to be a minimum distance from the artwork. Factor .25" outside the circle and then run the bleed as a rectangle to that distance. It will be greater in the area of the vertical strip, but that won't matter. In this case, just extend the strip edges making certain the circle cuts into the strip ...


3

Select the outside path and choose Object > Path > Offset Path and experiment with the setting. It will give you a replica of the path that will allow you to hold bleeds.


1

If by cutout you mean a dieline/diecut, you seem to describe it right. You simply draw a path/outline around the area where you want the cut out to be, a bit as you would if you had to indicate to someone how to cut a shape on a sheet of paper. That line will be solid (eg. not dashed or dotted). Like the pink line in the example below: That line should be ...


1

As with most things, it comes down to costs. You can hire a print provider to emboss for you. They have big automated machines to emboss thousands of sheets quickly. If you don't want to pay for that, then you are limited in your ability to improve upon the time necessary for manual embossing.


1

The concept is right as AndrewH said. 3-5 mm wil be fine. (The distance form the magenta circle to the green one) Just two things. I would add cut lines on the gray square. I do not know how the sheet will be arranged to fit several circles or not, but if you are printing one by one or using rows and colums this marks will help to align the cut. Put them i ...


1

Standard procedure in the packaging industry is to have a separate spot colour (and sometimes a separate layer too) for creases and cuts. So if you follow this rule, create a creases spot colour and a cuts spot colour and then a crease would be dashed line coloured as crease and the perforation would be dashed line coloured as cut. If necessary, you could ...


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