Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
10

Study Colour Management. Find and worship "CMYK 2.0 by Rick McCleary." I use it as my course text. Tip: What you should be trying to do is to get your screen to look like the print. Begin by making your studio viewing conditions graphics-industry standard and stable. Block out all sources of variable illumination (windows). All illumination should be the ...


9

Nothing wrong, is just the Indesign Typical Display Image. Select the image > Go to menu Object > Display Performance > High Quality Display The Typical Display Image is to work faster with the application, having a book with many images and all at High Quality Display would reduce the work speed.


7

Could I suggest the "really, really obvious empirical method"? Get a sheet of A4. Hold it up to the screen. Change the image zoom scale until it matches. Forget DPI & pixel density. You just want it "the same apparent size". Unless you have a screen with a physical pixel density of 350 & at least 3840x2160, you cannot achieve a complete 1:1 image ...


7

InDesign does not "store" any data for placed images. Everything is a "link" to the original image file and not "embedded" within InDesign. What happens to placed images in InDesign upon output.... InDesign references the original image data InDesign transforms the original data as necessary to meet the InDesign document. What that means is... if you scale ...


6

The only scenario in which I would create multiple copies of the document in varying sizes is if one was intended for print only and the other was intended for digital use and possibly at home printing. The only difference here (usually) is that the official print version is designed in spreads (2-3 pages side by side) so that it actually becomes a true ...


6

Make sure that the screen definition as seen by Gimp is the real one: Edit>Preferences>Interface>Display>Monitor resolution (in 2.8: Edit>Preferences>Display>Monitor resolution). This part is the most often overlooked. If necessary, calibrate it(*). Make sure that the print definition (ie, the DPI for the printer) is correct: Image>...


5

You can't print 'bright' colors on uncoated stock on a desktop inkjet printer because the uncoated stock just soaks in the ink. Your sample card appears to be printed offset. Possibly using opaque inks, raised ink, a varnish, or some combination of those techniques.


5

InDesign has an incredibly powerful pre-flight & packaging system set up for exactly this task: Once you've opened the palette up you can choose (or create) an appropriate pre-flight profile: You can edit that profile and add all the relevant resolution and colour space parameters which you feel appropriate to this given project: Which will then ...


3

What may feel implicit to you would most certainly be expected by them to be explicit. You get what you pay for. You say "Can I have 1,000 of these printed?" They say, "Yes, they'll be ready Wednesday. That'll be $25 please." You say, "Can I have 1,000 of these printed & guillotined down to the crop marks?" They say, "Yes, They'll be ready Thursday. ...


3

It is simply called aliasing. On a laser printer theres not much you can do about it. It simply happens because you are very close to the actual resolution of the printer. Yes aliasing is highly dependent on exact implementation details of the printer and the size of the actual dots the printer uses. Printers can not really smooth lines though, they may ...


3

Adobe Acrobat has a number of tools to analyze PDF documents. You can use the Preflight tool (Edit → Preflight...) to analyze for any pre-print issues, including ink coverage, image resolution etc. and correct some issues. There are a number of preset profiles that you can use, I believe some contain ink coverage checks. You can create your own custom ...


3

An ink can not match that color. I doubt any ink system, such as CMYK, or even CcMmYyK, will match it. There's no way to get the same vibrance in standard inks. Digital printing, while it may accept RGB color input, still outputs CMYK or CcMmYyK It doesn't print RGB. RGB is a light spectrum you can't print light. You might find a spot color (Pantone) that ...


3

Illustrator's Live Trace set to three colours did a reasonable job vectorising this example - if the rest are similar, you can convert all to vector art and be guaranteed good large-format output. Though in this case I simply exported as a larger .png to make image posting easier here at GD.SE, you should have no trouble with .svg, or .pdf or .eps - ...


3

Well... First concern is copyright. You can't just take anything you see and use it as you wish without infringing upon copyrights, unless you have permission. Now, that being posted, for your own use, in your own home, and as a one-off piece, you're probably okay. I'm not a lawyer, but that sounds like "fair use" to me. Second concern, how to get a good ...


2

Two possibilites how they achieved this look and feel: The foundation for the print (usually white) soaks in a lot of the color in the process. Then it was not a finishing step. They have used a matte UV top coat. Then it was a (well in case of UV: two) finishing step. But first to get a very high-quality print directly onto a blank disc you would have to ...


2

Put simply, some RGB (RE:HEX) colors just can not be reproduced via CMYK. Your only option is to find something visually as close as you can. That often means ignoring the RGB?Hex numbers entirely and using your eyeballs to find a color, not software. The optimum method to do this is to look at physical Pantone books, not a screen. Because everything on any ...


2

When you create an Illustrator file there is an option for the color mode: CMYK: Cyan (blueish), Magenta (redish), Yellow, Key (black) RGB: Red, Green and Blue CMYK is a four color system used in the print industry. Comes from the days of using plates and they would have a plate for each color. RGB is based on how TVs originally worked, where they had an ...


2

I'm having a similar issue with a client which produces multiple PDFs, some for the web, some for print (either office or professional prints) and some for all uses. What we have come up with as the most flexible solution is to always use a landscape A4 format (without using spreads in InDesign). Why: you can print it on A4 landscape you can project it and ...


2

It's difficult to tell for sure from a photograph, but that looks like offset lithographic printing and thermography. Basically, after printing and while the ink is still wet, the sheets are run through a machine that coats the entire sheet with powdered resin. The powdered resin sticks to the wet ink and the excess is removed by suction from the unprinted ...


2

If you want accurate color when sending to print, you need to convert all images to the cmyk color space. Rbg is used to set the color of light and many rgb values cannot be recreated in print. Also, you can use the eyedropper tool in illustrator to sample the black color in the image and apply it to the background shape in illustrator. If they are both in ...


2

The problem with your approach is that as soon as you get a new printer, you need to recreate every asset. So you want a printer that is a slave to your process, not the other way around. You will never get exact color, but the best way to handle this is to calibrate your monitor (rent a monitor calibration device from a photography shop) and ensure that ...


2

They are asking for a specific case of rich black. Take a look at this post and answer. When should I use rich black? and What kind of black should I use when designing for CMYK print? But in this specific case, in my opinion, they are asking for an old, archaic, pre-digital era rich black. Today, the maximum ink "the press can take" TAC (Total area ...


2

Scott has already covered the basics of RGB to CMYK conversions, so I won't go over the same ground. If, however, you can persuade them to go with a spot colour, then purely on economic considerations, let them know about Reflex Blue. It's not a match for their RGB values, nor as close as Scott's Pantone 2736, but the one advantage it has is it's ...


1

Any high quality digital print can be referred to as "Giclee" -- it's merely a marketing term used to ramp up pricing. Technically both a "digital print" and a "Giclee print" can come off the exact same printer. How you choose to differentiate between them is really about sales and marketing not technology. Same reason name brand groceries cost more ...


1

DPI of your image document is not similar kind of DPI as that of a printer. This is why a concentrated effort has been made to call the former PPI. A raster image has 8 bits of colors per dot/ channel and a printer has 1 bit per dot/ channel. This means that a printer need s quite a bit of dots to accomplish the same thing. In fact a 1200 DPI offset or ...


1

Make a layer via copy with the selection of the tile Put a horizontal guide where the arc stars and draw a horizontal dash a pixel width using the Pencil Tool over this guide outside the image Duplicate the layer and move it down until the dash touch the image bottom. Reduce the layer opacity to see exactly where to locate it: Create the bottom guide, ...


1

Generally speaking, use RGB for web, and home/office inkjet printing (with sRGB as the profile). CMYK for professional digital/lithographic printing, or even Spot Pantone colours for lithographic printing/screen printing. Some formats to give your client: Vector: PDF, SVG, EPS, and Raster: PNG, JPEG, CMYK TIFF. That should just about cover everything they ...


1

If you were to print it at 300dpi, which is the resolution usually employed for quality print work in publications, then simply divide the each pixel dimension by 300, to give you the size in inches. That would be 4.45" x 2.5" I suppose you could perhaps get away with 200dpi, which would make the image a little bigger, but slightly less quality.


1

"Converting" a PDF to a PSD means they will rasterize everything. No live type, no vector paths, everything will be raster (pixels). Now, that in itself may not be an issue. However, I'd be wary. The printing process typically uses a RIP (Raster Image Processor) which rasterizes everything in order to make the plate for press. But Imagesetters work at much ...


1

Generally home/office printers can only print RGB image files. The artwork for professional printing is often made in CMYK. So that may be your problem. Make sure the images your are printing are not in CMYK. If necessary ask your designer to provide RGB versions of the files.


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