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10

I tend to keep everything digital. When floppys died I moved everything to Zip disks. When Zip disks died I moved everything to a hard drive. (considered moving to Jaz drives but was wary of yet another external format at the time) When CDs started to fade, I moved all CD content to hard drives. Primarily because by that time hard drives grew 10x+ ...


8

The best compression technique I use for making PDF's smaller without loosing quality is saving it using the Adobe PDF Preset: PDF/X-1a:2001. How it makes the file smaller is by defining a set of rules that forbid the use of certain PDF functions that are irrelevant for printing purposes and to enforce others that do improve its usefulness in prepress. ...


5

You did well in creating the dimensionality of the gummi bear, but one aspect that I feel did not come through as well is the transparency. It might have been the specific lightning you were copying, but more contrast between the light and dark parks would help give it a more transparent and shiny look.


5

My first piece of advice is to be sure of the size you need. I have the Intuos A3, but I end up using only a section of the available surface. When I used the whole surface I found the increased travel was actually giving me RSI in the elbow. The size smaller would have been sufficient for my needs in the end. Perhaps you can rent one to try out? I ...


5

You have a few things that you need to be concerned about preserving. When we talk about digital preservation, we typically are concerned with: The physical media. This is handled through what's called a 'media refresh', typically done every 5-10 years, depending on the type of media. You read everything off of the older media, validate it against the ...


4

You can't easily preserve digital files for a few reasons: physical media becomes outdated software becomes out dated systems to run said outdated software becomes outdated Not that you shouldn't back up data, of course. 'The Cloud' makes this a little easier in regards to the physical media issue. You still have the other two issues, though. For example, ...


4

The rule of thumb is to use JPEG for photos, and PNG for graphics. Of course, there are instances where this rule doesn't apply, but usually this is the best choice. The advantage of JPEG is that it can compress large, detailed images to workable file sizes. PNG works better for images that have straight lines and geometric shapes (lines that shouldn't ...


4

For me... with no transparency.. whichever is smaller (kb). Save for Web in Adobe apps allows you to switch between formats to compare resulting file sizes. I simply switch between PNG24 and JPG to compare the resulting sizes. I start with JPG medium (30) and check quality. Then compare to the PNG24 size. If JPG 30 is smaller.... I start stepping up by ...


4

Three popular digital art applications used by both amateurs and professionals alike, in order of price (low to high): ArtRage - I've never used it, but I've heard good things about it from people who are exclusively interested in simulating painting and drawing digitally. Price: $30-$60 Sketchbook Pro by Autodesk - This is slick and does a great job of ...


3

You could use calibration to get the views on both your monitors to line up, colour-wise. The quality of the calibration depends on how much you'll spend on calibration soft- and hardware. This can get pretty expensive. Even if you calibrate yourself, you never know how things will look for the 'average' user. Hardly anyone calibrates their monitor, let ...


3

Files simply do not work like this. Even if all PDF readers had implemented such a file-destruction mechanism, it could easily be circumvented by copying the file before printing or recompiling any open-source PDF reader with that feature disabled. Moreover, as long as the user has access to a regular printing interface (to choose the printer), they can ...


3

It's not clear what you mean by "make it look like a real wallpaper." In any event, I see 2 issues with the image: The bunny is overexposed and that's causing the highlights to be blown out. If you shot it RAW then you could decrease the exposure a bit to fix that. (You might then need to compensate by raising the mids.) The shadow doesn't match the ...


3

MyPaint is a nice open-source digital painting application. The results look fairly realistic, but it doesn't have some of the nice media and brushes that paid applications have. But it sounds like you want to get your feet wet, and for that, this would be a great project. I've produced works-for-hire with it, and the clients loved the results. One tip: get ...


3

Digital archiving is hard. You have to plan to overcome the technical barriers. So the media needs to be refreshed periodically to avoid becoming obsolete you also need multiple copies to avoid bit rot. Digital stuff rarely survive even small partial corruption. So redundant store is a must. Files should rely on standards as those are easier to reproduce ...


3

The method I would use to create such shading and highlights is to use gradient meshes in Adobe Illustrator. Here's an example showing the kind of effects you can get. This technique isn't quick or easy, but it's worth learning how to do it. There are's a good tutorial to get you started on the Adobe website: https://helpx.adobe.com/uk/illustrator/how-to/...


3

I will try to point you "whys", and possible fixes in terms of Krita, that is the tool I use. Your machine is too slow to correctly process strokes, dropping information. Try playing with: distance precision canvas size (make it smaller) monitor resolution (make it smaller) canvas bit depth Generally it is not the case as strokes delay only, don't drop ...


3

I use Krita, not Photoshop so I can't point you a solution specifically in Photoshop. I will first point a quick possible big "why" for your problem and latter point other possible problems from digital vs traditional. Be aware that many visual aspects of the big "why" point can be a reflex from other points I point later. Take in mind that much ...


3

Imagine doing this with an actual painting – you would not be able to look under the new layer at all, so don't feel discouraged by the confusion. Work with it just as if you were painting without layers, going from what you can see, being careful not painting haphazardly over any details that you wish to keep. To actually make this easier, try binding a ...


2

Clearly digital technologies introduced ipso facto some very interesting concerns in terms of preservation. Without entering the old paper vs digital debate, it's true that we are still able to read some ancient egypt papyrus when some CDs we burnt only a few years ago are not readable anymore. This preservation paradygm relies on two aspects. First of all, ...


2

Yes you can achieve that with blending modes. I'll show you a quick example by adding some extra lit areas around the window... First, on a new layer, I block in some color in the areas I want lit. I used a solid shape for the lower area and radial gradients around the actual window: I then set the layer blending mode to "Soft Light": There is no hard-...


2

Depens a lot on what program are you using. But lets get to that later. In general: Try to texture a bit the objects. Even Paint wich is the most basic program ever, has a spray that can give you a bit texture. See the frame of the door. Projected shadows. This is the most basic thing to give deept to an image, In the example one object is now clearly ...


2

You can view specifications at Wacom's web site. Look at pressure levels, active area, and those sorts of things. No need to repeat them here. The ones with "touch" in their name also have touch capabilities (ability to use your fingers). Adobe tests it's software with Wacom tablets. Yes, it works in all of them. There may be some limitations based on ...


2

I found when printing a book for a biblical scholar there are Hebrew fonts for Hebrew text and we had to use a TrueType font named SBL Hebrew: It worked well in both digital and printed formats. If you'd like to test the font out here's the font download.


2

I will cheat and give you some links for you to study. Inkscape: realistic lighting and shading How can I make a shape look like it is made of glass? Prototype Visualization: How can I learn to render glass convincingly? What you will notice and learn is that a glossy material has its looks for what is what they are reflecting, not what the material is ...


2

At first this seems to be a quite common "how to triangulate" -case. But it's more complex. The bottles are probably revolved (=lathed) 3D objects made in a 3D program. They are side views, so a competent Illustrator user also draws them quite fast manually. Illustrator's 3D revolve effect doesn't make triangle networks. It makes curved wireframes. In ...


2

I can't tell you exactly how this was made. To me it looks like it was digitally painted somehow. Especially if I compare it to other images from the same artist. Here are some tips on how to achieve the same look. I made a quick sketch with black outlines multiplied onto some simple fills: The effect on the outline looks like Red/Cyan Fringe, which is ...


2

It looks to me like the that the splatter pattern is only on the top and bottom (and extreme right side) of the graphic. That effect might be easier to create and control with an grunge pattern overlay on top of a solid color pink line (that itself looks like a grunge brush) than with a complex brush. That's definitely how I'd tackle it. EDIT: It ...


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