Hot answers tagged

10

Traditionally stock sites allow you download a free, watermarked "comp" image which can be used in your design until the client approves the piece. Once the client has approved, you can then go back and purchase and download the non-watermarked image. You are free to purchase and download the non-watermarked image whenever you'd like however. It's not ...


9

There are many applications that can do this. I have explained two options that you may consider: (1) Paid Applications: (from Adobe) a. Photoshop - Image manipulation b. Illustrator - Vector Graphics c. Indesign - Layout your cover page/book exactly for Print & Publishing (2) Free Applications: (Open Source) a. GIMP - Image manipulation b. Inkscape - ...


6

Some general considerations: Positioning of the title I don't feel there is an obvious advantage to any of the two/three versions, but I do prefer n. 4 because the white background highlights the image more, and the overlay of the font at the top looks pretty nice. Pick of photographs I am nor particularly tempted by the cookies, and the lemon pie ...


6

As far as I am concerned the effect of low resolution on e-ink screens is quite similar to the appearance of the newspaper where low-quality paper with high soaking ability tends to distort fine details of letter shapes. So I would probably recommend the same typefaces that are used for setting the text in newspapers - low-contrast, with thicker serifs and ...


5

Books for electronic devices are typically sold with reflowable text. I suggest you look into how to build an ePub. I suggest this because your are not allowed to sell or offer PDF format on iBooks Since you have mentioned possible building for android I would advise reflowable and not fixed. Fixed layout ebooks are developed based on the devices ...


4

Your best approach for filesize, image quality, and flexibility will probably be a SVG with an embedded image (or two). If you size and position everything (text, image, vector graphical elements) with the SVG and then put an appropriate "viewBox" parameter on it, the SVG format will handle scaling down the images to size. If you are able to successfully (...


4

The advantages in using a traced SVG file over a compressed bitmap image in JPEG format depend much on the complexity of content. Simple objects In case we have few colors, and simple geometrical objects a traced vector image will gain clarity is scalable without losing much information, and will be smaller in size than the bitmap: Left 7.2 kB JPG source....


4

The limitation is primarily that of resolution. eINK is getting pretty good, but not quite as high resolution as your typical paper. So, just as you would for screens, you might want to lean towards typefaces that have a lower contrast between stroke weights. Avoid the Bodonis, for example. As long as you pick a sturdy text face, the readability is likely ...


4

Definitely cover 3. It looks healthier, which is probably what most people will be looking for when search for low carbohydrate deserts. The food is also presented a lot better than in the other photos.


3

I'm not entirely sure it will work as intended, but you could try to give the image a text wrap. Select it, and find the Text Wrap palette through Window > Text Wrap or Alt+Ctrl/Option+W. Click the second icon 'wrap around bounding box'. That way, the image will not tolerate any text on top of it, pushing any text that would come under or over it to lower ...


3

You can not reflow text across frames with anything other than InDesign. What you are seeking is not possible. What you may be able to do is have everyone work on the text in a Word file. You can then link that text file to the InDesign document. So, changes to the Word file are automatically updated within InDesign. This will not allow others to view the ...


2

Some fonts typically seen on E-Ink devices are Times, Palatine, Plantin, Sabon, Georgia, Gill Sans, and Rockwell. It is widely accepted that serif fonts will be easier on the eyes than sans-serif fonts. I've done some searches and it seems that many people like Plantin. In the end it comes down to personal preference. Try out a few and see which ones you ...


2

The typeface looks to be a Palatino knock-off (there are literally dozens and dozens of them in circulation) "created" by someone who was evidently half drunk half the time and comatose otherwise. The knobby artifacts you're seeing are hinting gone terribly wrong, I would guess. So, no, it's not intentional, and no, it's not your display.


1

I am no ePub expert, but I will share my experiences as a graphic designer (with a little coding knowledge). I have never used "Split Document", so I wouldn't worry too much about it. I guess you would use it if your epub-file is too large, but wait and see if it is indeed a problem. Regarding class-names, remember to only use standard latin characters (I ...


1

This totally depends on your license. If you use any typeface without having the proper license, you are breaking copyright laws. You license text should describe whether you can use a typeface like this. Try and find out what license you have for the typeface you want to use.


1

In the first set, the font is particularly problematic. That font looks 'fat' and round and bursting at the seams. In both sets, the images are too noisy. Low === Minimal imo, so you should go for a minimalist, light and airy design. This is a very appropriate use case to recommend using a very thin and simplistic font - definitely avoid strong serifs....


1

Using inkscape to convert scanned color drawings to svg — recommended or no? I would say, generally tracing photos or detailed, photo-like images is very very difficult to do well, so not really. But of course, there are ways... Based on the image you provided, here is what I would attempt: The black and white line-drawings should be simple enough to ...


1

Once two unconnected pages are in the same file, you can connect them the same way you have with the pages that were already there. Click the text thread square in the bottom-right of the page (just above the bottom-right corner) and then click on the frame you'd like to connect. Even if there's content in the imported frame, the two threads will connect. ...


1

I learned a lot from the Classroom In A Book series mentioned in the other answer, and I recommend them highly, but it can only teach you so much. If you have access to any Adobe User Group meetings (for example there is an InDesign User's Group that meets in my area), you will learn much more from experts. Additionally, there are some amazing tutorial ...


1

While Vincent's answer is correct if this image were to be on a single page to be placed inside a text block I think you're going to run into issues on the export because you will have to export the ePub as a fixed layout to get this to work as a spread on a device. Since you will run into complications with the text and the image I would use what's ...


1

From your question and comments, I would strongly recommend signing up for a free trial week on Lynda.com and going through David Blatner's "InDesign Essentials" title and a couple of more advanced ones. He did two titles, at least, for CS5.5. Apply your OCDness to defining terminology. If you don't know what a pica is, or any other term you come across, ...


1

Fit Text To Frame: not that I know of. There are hotkeys to increase/decrease font size, and you can also click in the Point Size edit control and use the arrow keys to increase and decrease. You can drag horizontal and vertical guides out of the rulers at the top and left (if you don't have these, check the View window). Use the arrow keys to move by small ...


1

Images should save as JPG files. In adobe photoshop press CTRL+ALT+SHIFT+S. Then new window will pop up. You can reduce the quality, this will reduce size (But keep it clear to read) Use resolutions to 72pixels/inch Then save.


1

The reason why they ask for a big size like this is because of the pixel density of some e-readers and they're probably looking for future device requirements. Indeed, it's huge and your print-ready cover file might not even be big enough to fit this requirement! So it's possible you can't even use the suggested requirement from Amazon for now. But keep in ...


1

Although the free (open source) software is fantastic you can still run into hurdles when trying to then work in CMYK as the tend not to have this colour mode in their make up yet. It could be worth considering the use of Adobe's Creative Cloud if you need to over come this issue. You will need to sign up for a minimum of a year but it will work out cheaper ...


1

You really have in Photoshop everything you are likely to need, at least for now. If you were setting out to do this for a living, I'd steer you toward InDesign and Illustrator, but for your purposes you can (and professional designers do, in many cases, depending on the specific design) work entirely in Photoshop. If you find you need to create ...


1

Consider this: You have PS or Gimp for your photo manipulation. Then you have a vector-based programme like Illustrator or Inkscape for scalable vector work. Then, finally, you have InDesign or Scribus as the desktop publishing programme where it all comes together. The last two are desktop publishing programmes, and as such, are programmes commonly ...


1

I'm looking for a way to convert a notepad (multiple pages of hand-written text) into a PDF or other e-book type file format (DjVu?) that would preserve existing typography as well as allow searching and selecting texts. You would have to build an image based ebook if you want to preserve typography. Please understand if you have a full notepad worth ...


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