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62

The hatching can be achieved by using pattern.Once you create a pattern,you can control the direction of hatching as required. Below are the steps to apply hatching to your drawing (I will apply this in a simple rectangle). Create a closed path for which hatching is required(I have used a simple rectangle) Now draw a line using pen tool and convert the ...


37

The hole in a real VW is a common sheet metal trick named "Rounded Louver". Realistic drawing of a louver needs complex shading. It's easiest if you can accept it as bent inwards, without shiny glosses and without a chrome edge list. Here are three of them on a flat surface: One louver is made by interpolating between a black line and blue edge ...


33

It's called a Moiré pattern. It forms when two 'grid' patterns (loose term that could apply to geometric lines, dots, etc.) are overlaid with each other and moved. In this case, the two 'grid patterns' are the image, itself (which is geometric lines) and the pixel based screen-refresh of your screen. A similar effect is when newscasters would wear ...


26

I think there is some major color profile confusion going on here. When I download the low res version with the vibrant colors you like, I notice that its color profile is Adobe RGB. The hi res version is Untagged RGB but I assume it's sRGB. Here are the two images side by side: If I wrongly assign Adobe RGB to the hi res version, it gets more vibrant and ...


23

Moiré of the pattern overlaying itself The pattern of the logo creates a surprising visual appearence of motion when it is shown on an LCD* and the view is scrolled by small fractions of the pattern size. The effect seen when scrolling the image up and down is a Moiré pattern. This kind of pattern appears when two regular line patterns overlay. The two ...


22

There are a few ways to create the gradient effect, but this is how I would do it... Create the hexagon shape out of 6 triangles: Then apply different gradients to each triangle: Finally mask parts of the triangle gradients with hexagons (solid for the middle, strokes for the others):


17

I think it depends on the art style you want to go for. If you're doing a flat design style like in your first image, then you can replicate the vents by using 2 rounded-rectangles that overlap. If you're going with the other images, then it would be a similar process. Draw the shapes and use gradients.


15

Found an interesting option in this video. Start by creating a grid with the Rectangular Grid or Polar Grid tool. Click Object > Envelope Distort > Make with Mesh Add some perspective with the Effect > 3D > Rotate and adjust to your liking. Move the points from the Mesh grid (not your original grid) until you get the desired effect. Go back and tweak ...


15

Looking at the pictures you posted, it seems to me that the ones you consider "duller and less vibrant" are actually higher quality images, not just in resolution, but in color information. This is a detail taken from the "duller" image: This is the same detail from the "more vibrant" one: It seems obvious to me that a lot of ...


14

These images are called illusory motion, and curiously enough, there's still no solid explanation for them (there are strong theories, though). Some visual scientists think it has to do with fixation jitter: involuntary eye movements that give the illusion that objects near what you're fixated on are moving. Others think that when you glance ...


14

That’s a halftone. Halftone is the reprographic technique that simulates continuous tone imagery through the use of dots, varying either in size, in shape or in spacing, thus generating a gradient like effect. It can be achieved in Photoshop by choosing Filter → Pixelate → Color Halftone. The example you posted looks like the halftone version of the ...


13

I'd use a Bevel and Emboss effect, combined with a Satin effect, and a curves Adjustment layer to modify the colours. It's difficult to get the colours exactly the same, since I have no idea what specific curves were used. But the example below should give you a basic idea of how to get something similar.


12

This is possible to do. You just need to know a very rarely used feature*. First turn on transparency grid, so that you can observe the effect. Choose: View → Show Transparency Grid or hit Shift + Ctrl + D. Next make a primitive shape like a box to design the effect on (due to text grouping it is easier to design on something else first). In the ...


11

Start with a normal Drop Shadow. Play a little with the settings (Don’t forget to use Spread). Right-click the Effect Layer and select Create Layer (Ignore any warning dialogue). Merge the new Drop Shadow layer with your white background (Or create a Smart Object from them). If you like you can tweak the shadow a little bit with Curves or Levels to make ...


11

There are some changes in color. Tts difficult to see with naked eyes but if you import you object to photoshop and use eyedroper you can see some color variations. How you can achieve this effect: Create the pattern(There are lots of ways to create this if you don't want to create this manually). You can change the color of upper and lower strips Now put ...


10

I found a quickish method! You had almost all of the workflow, and the 'cutout' part that you had, is what I was missing when trying at first. Starting with this image, because I couldn't find the one you're using: The longest part for me was masking out the background. You may also need to add a Black & White adjustment layer after step 2 if you're ...


10

This is how I would go about it. You will need an image in good resolution (as big as the zoomed part). Pardon my very simple samples, I hope you can get the idea anyway! Open the image. Make a round selection of the part you will want zoomed in using the Elliptical Marquee Tool. Once you have your circle selected, copy and paste in a new layer (one way is ...


9

Draw a rectangle that covers the whole canvas. Make sure you have "Smart Guides" activated (View->Smart Guides or Ctrl+U) Draw a bunch of black (or any other colour) lines creating your design. The lines can intersect (encouraged) but make sure they touch each other or they touch the border of the rectangle (i.e. the border of the canvas). This is why ...


9

Google may use a different system but a large number of such services (tineye included) use perceptual hashes where the overall hash is close enough to be a match, rather than exact. A whitepaper showed up a few years back which detailed the process. I haven't been able to find a link to it, but the basic system relies on a action chain to generate the ...


9

I think you were on the right track with your watermarking option, but you left too much of the original image in tact. Here are two images I tried that Google was unable to find: Checkerboard Reverse image search results Mosaic Reverse image search results Another example Reverse image search results The first image returns a lot of "checkered flag" ...


9

This will give you a flat color version: Create one hexagon Ctrl+C copies it to clipboard Ctrl+F duplicates the shape (aka. Paste in Place) scale up either one of these 2 hexagons until it looks right Ctrl+A selects both shapes Go to 'Object → Blend → Blend Options' and choose 10 Specified Steps (or as many as you want in between) Ctrl+Alt+B makes the blend ...


8

If you are familiar with Inkscape, I would recommend using the Create Tiled Clones feature to create your vertical lines. You can then add the output to gimp. First, create a single vertical line, then select it: Select Edit > Create Tiled Clones... Set the number of rows and columns as desired: Set the Shift X per Column to be at least 100% and the ...


8

I've created an Adobe® Illustrator® Plug-in called Oblique Projection 'opo' to automate the creation process of Parallel 3D Effect (Extrude Effect). It is quick and gives you full control over the appearance of the extrusion. Everything is on one layer so you can easily separate it from the rest of the artwork. Plus it is divided into logical parts - this ...


8

The procedure to create complex gradient is eventually pretty easy. In Illustrator: Sep 1) Create a rectangle the size of your canvas, with no stroke or fill Step 2) Now you need to create what is called "Gradient Mesh"! You'll find its icon in the toolbar. Step 3) with the tool active, simply click where you want to add a pivot (sort of control point) ...


8

From an architectural standpoint try to think of these not as triangles but as surfaces. Surfaces are made up of sides. In this case these just happen to be, mostly though not entirely, triangles. Use the line tool, not the polygon tool. For a quick example here's a rough animation:


8

You might be able to achieve this using filters, but I would actually consider redrawing the photo entirely using Illustrator a similar vector tool. You can do this using the Pen Tool. To make things easier, start by pasting the photo you want to convert, and maybe turning it into B&W and increasing the contrast. That will give you a nice base to work ...


8

It's called posterization (as it was a technique to allow for making posters easier via screen printing, block printing, or lithography). The most common ways to achieve it: use the 'posterize' filter in your raster image editor of choice (photoshop, pixelmator, GIMP, etc.) use a vector tracing tool (as previously mentioned)


8

You can get the same effect with a single live text object (meaning you can have this effect and still be able to edit the text) using the Appearance panel. With your text selected, open the Appearance panel (Window → Appearance). Using the buttons at the bottom of the panel add a fill and two strokes. Set your fill and drag it above the strokes in the ...


8

You can do this with other raster image editing software, such as GIMP which is free. It can be done by using layers and layer masks. In fact almost any raster image editor which has layer support could be used. Here's an example below made in GIMP. The idea here was to have the word "Hannibal" reveal an image of the Alps, through an image of an ...


8

You can apply the colors of the low-res image to the hi-res image quite easily, because our perception of the details is mostly based on luminosity and not on color or saturation(*). Open the high-res image File ➤ Open as layers the low-res image Scale it up to match the hi-res image. This will make it blurry. Here is for instance, your image, ...


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