Hot answers tagged

15

EPS is an old format with support for full transparency (i.e the background can be tranparent), and also supports the use of clipping paths for transparency around a raster image, but it doesn't support semi-transparent fills, or gradients with semi-transparency. Doesn't really matter what software you use. It's not actually possible in a pure EPS format, ...


11

SVG is often not suitable for... Embroidery Signage Print production When providing a logo you should provide usable formats for a range of things. SVG, EPS, AI, PDF, PSD, JPG, PNG, even GIF. Simply because an SVG file can be opened in an editor and resaved is not a reason to fail to provide viable formats to the client. What if the client doesn't want to ...


7

but I'm not sure what the client would miss out on in regard of print What the client will be missing is color accuracy. It used to be that most printers will refuse to accept RGB files which by extension means all Inkscape svg files. The reason for this is that they risk the client rejecting their print jobs due to the colors not matching. These days ...


5

Thank you all for your replies, all three answers so far were very helpful and highlighted different aspects. I will try to compile and summarize into one answer, what I understood from reading your input (I apologize if putting that into it's own answer isn't appropriate). Just providing SVG files for logos is not sufficient, since it lacks CMYK support ...


4

If you hit CTRL+Y in Illustrator it goes into 'Outline Mode' and then, if all you can see at this point is a rectangle with a big X across, then your EPS file is a raster image (a photo), not actual vector shapes. In which case, yes, making edits is not possible because there would be no actual shapes to edit in Illustrator. Illustrator does not make edits ...


2

This probably isn't relevant to this particular case, but for anyone looking here for answers it might be worth considering an experience I had - One of my colleagues was dealing with another company and struggling to find a file format that worked for both of them. I said, how about asking them what software they're using. Guess what - it was Corel - same ...


1

The first step is to verify the white isn't actually part of the artwork. To do this you need to open the EPS in a vector editor - Illustrator or Inkscape. Then check the construction. If there's a white object for the background, merely remove it and resave the file. If there is no white object for the background... Some applications, when saving an EPS, ...


1

Try this: In Inkscape open the SVG, and then do File > Save As, then set the file type to "Optimized SVG". This can be used to remove all of the Inkscape specific XML which if left will probably just confuse Illustrator. Remember to give the file a new name if you don't want to overwrite the original. Set up the options like this: When you open ...


1

You must remove the hidden objects, especially for the EPS format. Hidden objects can reappear when some EPS files are processed. That doesn't seem to happen with PDF or AI formats (at least I haven't seen it happen.)I, personally, have filed several bug reports with Adobe regarding this with EPS files from AI. You might consider a 2-file workflow. One ...


1

Photoshop could do the conversion easily - EPS would be loaded with transparency. Here's a simple EPS opened in Photoshop (no edits done): I guess you are not going to use Photoshop nor other commercial stuff which could do the job. There's an earlier answer which suggests converting the background to transparent with color to alpha in GIMP. It's a good ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible