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80

As Wrzlprmft has already pointed out, over 50% of your SVG file's size is taken up by an embedded PNG bitmap image used to create a fairly subtle shading effect on the controller. Just getting rid of that image, and replacing it with a simple radial gradient, is enough to shrink the SVG down to about 10kb.               ...


40

Your SVG contains an embedded pixel graphic for the shade in the bottom right of the controller. This is responsible for about ⅔ of the file size. If you remove it, your SVG file is en par with your JPEG. You can probably achieve an adequately similar effect with a gradient. Other techniques of reducing SVG file size include: Remove all Metadata and ...


30

I am a little surprised no-one has mentioned the "Scour" extension. It's bundled with Inkscape (as of v0.47), and does many of the optimisations mentioned by Ilmari Karonen.


23

Color number is just half the game. The other is to compress the picture after color reduction. This lossless compression, searches for repeated patterns in scanline order. Long story, in short: When you add the logo you are increasing the image variability, entropy. Compression gets worse the more entropy there is in the image, as the computer can nolonger ...


17

Although joojaa is mostly correct, actually GIFs do not use Run Length Encoding. They use the LZW algorithm. Basically, this algorithm can take advantage of EXACT repetitions of horizontal strips of pixels. This works very well for solid colours and regular dithering patterns (e.g. checkerboard patterns). However LZW can only "remember" 4096 different ...


11

Although the question was asked about Adobe Photoshop, the behavior is due to the lossy JPEG format and would be similar with any image editor. Cropping a JPEG can make it less compressible, especially when the x and y offsets of the cropped area are odd numbers. This causes a re-subsampling of the color channels that can make the cropped image more complex ...


10

I removed a large white background layer, and opened PSD file in illustrator. Then saved as PDF from illustrator. ~40MB pdf file became 98.3KB . The file was full of shapes and texts.


8

Fewer colors + 100% dither + no Transparency Dither = greater size. Adding a transparency dither or reducing the color dithering to less than 100% will most likely reduce the file size. When you reduce the color table and have a high dither setting, you ask Photoshop to dither with fewer colors. This actually creates more color data to maintain from frame ...


8

At the risk of being frowned upon for not answering your question, I would say this: don't worry about file size. Instead, worry about load time. They're certainly directly correlated, but the difference is that load time is universally applicable. A 2MB file might load instantly on a powerful hosting site such as imgur but not on an inexpensive shared ...


8

Probably the initial step is more planning than Photoshop's. 1) Do I need an image file? Or can I use something else Background-color. A css gradient. 2) Do I need that file dimensions? or can I use A lower dimension upscaled. Mask the low resolution with something? a pattern over it, a blur, darken it. A pattern. Is the image really worth it to have it ...


8

Can you post the original SVG image and link it here? Really it seems that you've done everything right in the SVG, all your shapes have anchor points. PNGs are not necessarily larger than SVG! It could also be the case that the PNG export actually has a lesser file size than SVG. Its really not that uncommon! Case in point from here -> https://en....


8

You are exporting at 300 ppi which is more for printing, for screens, I believe that the number is generally 72 ppi. I personally would just use Save for Web (Alt+Shift+Ctrl+S) and then manually input the size I want in the dialog.


7

My first, second and third answers to this question would be "Find a different printer, because the one you have is incompetent." There is no grande format equipment made that requires jpeg as input. Typical spec, this one from the Fuji website: Formats All popular desktop formats including PostScript 3, EPS, TIFF, PDF, both RGB and CMYK color spaces....


7

Before delivering your final website design, you really should optimise the images with tools that are more focused towards and dedicated to optimising images. Photoshop does okay, but I've seen many people comment that other tools do a better job. From what I hear, ImageMagick is pretty good for this purpose. However, as a command-line-noob I need to spend ...


7

Press-ready PDF files are almost always much larger in terms of file size due to flattening and expanding of objects. Note InDesign merely links to external images. However, a press-ready PDF must embed those links for proper reproduction.


7

Although your file is linked, Photoshop still saves the flattened image data. With a JPG you are unlikely to see any file size savings by using linked files. If you link another layered PSD for example, you will see file savings since all it is saving is the flattened pixel output and nothing else. The pixel preview it saves is scaled to its current size, ...


7

Depends a lot on a range of issues: 1) sheer vector data density - if it's a truly huge number of points and vectors, Illustrator will bog down. 2) some of the the specific effects applied to given layers - some of the rasterized effects can cause huge loads. 3) worth checking whether your Illustrator is running in GPU preview or CPU. 4) also look at how ...


6

By saving it from Photoshop you've saved an image file rather than merely text and shapes. So, your PDF is now just one big image. Photoshop may not have been the best tool to edit the PDF with. You can try flattening the Photoshop file before resaving it. That may reduce the file size. Optimally you'd want to save a PDF from an application which ...


6

Presumably you are just pasting the graphic into the document. There are a few alternate methods to reduce the filesize: Option 1: Use File → Place... Instead of pasting the raster image into your document, use File → Place.... This will create linked files in your document: It's important to note that your .ai file will no longer be self-contained. If ...


6

There is so many methods that reduce your PDF make sure you follow one of it or you may need "in some cases" to follow all of them. some when you export from indesign and some in Acrobat itself as a post production process. you can reduce the PDF by one of the following method. RGB color mode is less in size than CMYK images embeded in the document may be ...


6

What do you mean by 3D effect? You could always just create those spheres by placing a radial gradient inside a circular path. This would be the simplest method to do this.


6

Don't copy and paste the original objects, use Symbols! John's and Andrew's answers are both completely valid, but here's a third option that has a bit of a different workflow. You have three different spheres which you've presumably copy and pasted repeatedly. When done that way, Illustrator won't recognize that when saving and won't make any ...


6

Hum. Size is relative. You don't really have an SVG file of the same size as your png. In reality, you have a vector file that under this specific conditions match the dimensions of the PNG. Check this graph. You can make your SVG small or big in dimensions. If the the data is the same, the file size (weight) is the same. You can export a png (or whatever ...


6

I would resave the TIFF file with LZW compression turned on. That should get the size down considerably. Edit: If you are using Photoshop, you would simply "Save As", choose .TIF as your format and location. After that you should get a dialog box (see below) with compression options.


6

If the logo lends itself to vector format, and (arguably) it should, then you'd be better off designing it in a vector editing program (like Illustrator) and not having to worry about the resolution at all.


6

There are lots of different solutions. If you're asking how design companies share files internally, most would have an onsite server that everyone has access to. Well structured design companies normally have a standard filing system for individual projects that makes the project easy to find at a later date (naming by job number for example), so you ...


5

While GIF is a lossless format, it's also restricted to 256 colors. So in many cases, you're doing to see a reduction in quality from your source file if it's over 256 colors. But if you want to optimize the design for the GIF format, some things you can do: use flat colors (not gradients) limit the number of colors you use have said colors repeat ...


5

You'll probably need to make some manual adjustments to get the file sizes appreciably smaller. For example, the fading transitions in that animation add a fair amount of data, so if they're not vital you could remove them. The amount of detail doesn't make much difference, apart from in terms of keeping the colour palette small. The main thing to bear in ...


5

For something like this with lots of text, you can greatly reduce the file size of a PDF saved in Photoshop by making sure that the text is exported as vector. The reason your text is not being exported as vector is because you've got some of Photoshop's "Faux Styles" applied to your text. Any time you have one of these (Faux Bold, Faux Italic, Small Caps), ...


5

Tick the "Use Artboards" option when exporting if you want image to match artboard sizes. Otherwise, the image exports at it's given size, not the artboard size. The vast difference in export sizes could be due to raster effects like the drop shadow. Also, (based on comments below) a file exported at 300ppi will be much larger in terms of dimensions than a ...


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