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28

High pass is the opposite of gaussian blur If you take an image and blur it you only keep the "low frequencies". High pass makes the opposite, it only lets the "high frequencies" pass, or what most people call "the details". Any image can be deconstructed into these two components. Have you used unsharp mask to sharpen an image? That filter is actually ...


14

Did a little poking around...turns out that Poly uses something called Delaunay Triangulation. If you search around for that term, some stuff comes up. This guy (Jonathan Puckey) claims to pretty much own the process, but these guys (createtogether) would disagree - they've created a brush in Illustrator that lets you create something similar. I've not ...


14

This is very likely a gradient map, which allows you to map different colors to the luminosity of a given picture. There's more than one way to apply a gradient map: Select the desired layer, then go to Image → Adjustments → Gradient maps. This is destructive. In your layer palette, click the Fill and adjustments button and select Gradient map. This will ...


13

That's exactly what the Polar Coordinates filter does (Filter → Distort → Polar Coordinates...). Since you want a circle you'll need to distort the image in to a square first (otherwise you'll get an ellipse). The filter will repeat any pixels on the outside edge so you can make your canvas a few pixels taller on the bottom edge so that you get ...


9

Those look hand drawn. You could try using Photoshop's brush stroke filters (accented edges might the closest), and then mount it on a brown paper background, but it will still be some way off in terms of similarity. Hand drawn images will still be as close as you can get.


9

Draw a rectangle that covers the whole canvas. Make sure you have "Smart Guides" activated (View->Smart Guides or Ctrl+U) Draw a bunch of black (or any other colour) lines creating your design. The lines can intersect (encouraged) but make sure they touch each other or they touch the border of the rectangle (i.e. the border of the canvas). This is why ...


9

Google may use a different system but a large number of such services (tineye included) use perceptual hashes where the overall hash is close enough to be a match, rather than exact. A whitepaper showed up a few years back which detailed the process. I haven't been able to find a link to it, but the basic system relies on a action chain to generate the ...


9

I think you were on the right track with your watermarking option, but you left too much of the original image in tact. Here are two images I tried that Google was unable to find: Checkerboard Reverse image search results Mosaic Reverse image search results Another example Reverse image search results The first image returns a lot of "checkered flag" ...


8

From an architectural standpoint try to think of these not as triangles but as surfaces. Surfaces are made up of sides. In this case these just happen to be, mostly though not entirely, triangles. Use the line tool, not the polygon tool. For a quick example here's a rough animation:


8

I second the comment on your post. The original image is better, to my eyes, than the "improved" version. With respect, I think your thinking is back to front. Firstly, good job with the logo, considering you say you have little experience I think it's a reasonable job. But you should keep in mind that no filter, no quick trick, is going to make the ...


7

You can use an online tool like this triangulation tool or this Delaunay triangulations tool with images that you upload. Another option is Kubist, another online tool that does pretty much the same thing. An even more robust option that outputs similar images, allows you to use rectangles, circles, or triangles, and export to PNG, JPG, SVG, or GIF is ...


7

A high pass filter is a fitter that removes low frequency information form a singnal. Now there are many ways to implement a high pass filter, but photoshops high pass filter most likely is the result by subtracting the blurred image from the original (as mentioned by @filip). Simply all of image minus the low frequency is just the high frequency. Now if ...


6

No, it's not possible for PhotoShop filters to magically create nice artistic illustrations for you.


6

Both the photography itself and the majority of the processing are straight from the Joel Grimes playbook. You can catch the gist of things in the B&H Event Space video "Building the Dramatic Portrait with Joel Grimes". But to summarize: The subject photography is a three-light setup, with two gridded kickers (one to either side) and a small source ...


6

The method with polar coordinates seem already been shown in other texts. But if you use Filter > Distort > Spherize after that, you get a bigger central part. Not much imagination is needed to see that you could get maybe fully satisfying result also tiling circles that have transparent gradient fill. That job is most easily done in Illustrator. Here's an ...


5

I'm not sure what the effects would be in ImageMagick, but I'd start by trying to create the following steps: Increase contrast quite a lot Slightly blur Add a transparent texture for the paper Overlay coffee rings and misc stains (random placement if possible) Overlay a lighter texture to give the mottled effect on the darker areas Sepia tint/filter


5

This effect could also be achieved with the Stamp filter. (Filter>Sketch>Stamp) Though that is of course not to say that it cannot be achieved with the Photocopy filter. It depends what suits the image most. Toggling the Light/Dark Balance as well as the smoothness in this filter may achieve very close to the result you want depending on the source ...


5

None of the answers so far have touched on the maths behind the filter. Here's a detailed writeup from which I quote: Frequency filters process an image in the frequency domain. The image is Fourier transformed, multiplied with the filter function and then re-transformed into the spatial domain. Attenuating high frequencies results in a smoother image in ...


4

Hate to say it.. but you can't. Transformations, other than scale, permanently alter the SO. You can always double-click to open the SO, then drag-drop that layer to the document again and recreate a straight SO. But I realize this doesn't help when having to export many files.


4

From what I gather the spatter filter will solve your problem. Simply select Filter > Artistic > Spatter and toggle the preferences to where you deem fit. I have an example below of the 'jagged' result that I achieved from doing this. I also added a hint of sandstone texture to mimic that of the cardboard, there are options such as canvas either that you ...


4

It appears that you source image is tiled as if a scanner stitched small tiles together. The steps outlined below for Gimp help to reduce these tiles but this will be a lossy process. Image structure Small detail of the original image adjusted for black and white levels with "Colors > Levels.." tool reveals the tiling artifact: Unfortunately the border of ...


4

By default, GIMP can export to the .MNG file format - which is a somewhat complicated format designed to replace animated GIFs in the past, but never caught on due too being too complex. (GIMP itself implements a rather restricted subset of it). Since you asked "what animation formats GIMP support", it can also export to ".flic" - "Autodesk FLIC Animation" ...


4

As put in the comment, this is a workload that will require scripting GIMP - although it can be done in a more or less interactive way (as individual images need separate treatment, that may actually be needed). If you check Filters->Python->Console you will get an interactive Python console, from which you can interact with GIMP - and if you want a ...


4

It looks like the Cubism filter to me


4

This question is somehow wrong in many ways but warrants an answer nonetheless to get you onto the right track. There is no image when you have no post processing of the Lanczos filter. See the filter just turns the image into a continuous function. This in itself does nothing visible as this function needs to be used somehow to mean something Image 1: ...


4

To achieve a "high contrast, grainy, almost cool grey-blue look", try following these steps: Choose your image. I chose one of my favorite bouldering pics. Use a couple of adjustment layers. For this look, I used levels and Hue/saturation. Here's how I used levels. Really play around with this adjustment (it's my favorite one). You can take an image from ...


4

I would use pattern to make the stripes, other than that the process is similar to Storm Brewer's addition to the Ashlee Palka method. Sample image, credit goes to @tylerbarnes from Unplash. Create a new document with 1x8 pixel with transparent background. Zoom in and fill the first 4 pixels in white. Go to Edit > Define Pattern... and name it "stripes" ...


4

Here's a quick method to get you started. To get the polished look (like in your example) just spend more time on your masking to get a more mixed selection that will come across as more professional. For reference, I made this example in about 5 minutes. Step 1: Get your picture! Step 2: Duplicate your background layer (in case of royal failure) and start ...


4

It looks a bit like the G'MIC Multi-Layer Etch, in the Black and White filters section in G'MIC. Sorry can't be sure of the exact settings - I'm sure you can experiment But here's the example using that filter:


4

You could use a paper texture. Either find an old worn piece of paper and scan it, or find a texture to use online, then paste it on its own layer above the main image layer, and change the blending mode to Multiply. For example:


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