137

They do. The thing is, you probably don't realise, because upper case numbers have been all you've been using or seeing. There is a distinction between 'default' numbers and 'oldstyle' numbers. The default numbers we all know are the actual capitals, with the 'oldstyle' numbers (sometimes incorrectly called 'proportional numbers') are lowercase. Fonts tend ...


88

The vertical alignment of a plus sign and minus sign will be consistent (obviously I can't say for certain for all fonts, but generally). What you are using there (I assume), and the key on your keyboard is actually a hyphen or hyphen-minus. The vertical alignment of hyphens and dashes are often not the same as the alignment for a minus sign, which will be ...


47

While upper case numbers do exist, as is shown in vincents answer. They did not originally exist at all. Remember our numbers are copied from the Muslim scientists, who wrote in Arabic.* Arabic is unicase, that is all letters are same case. So the notion of big and small numbers is a later development. Since the original system had no case so did the ...


44

The actual reason is not for unity. Is for durability of the stencil. Small triangles like under the N or the gap that would form inside the E would break very fast and the stencil would be useless in no-time.


34

A Good font: Pair kernings have been addressed. How does "AV" look? Or "To"? The glyph box is not dramatically larger (or smaller) than the glyphs Glyph alignment on the baseline is correct, including adjustments for caps and rounds such as C, O, G, Q, S, etc. Stroke weights, thick or thin, are consistent between various glyphs, even if they have varying ...


29

While this is primarily a list of sites, know that browsing a website is not the only way to look for typefaces. Some type foundries still publish specimen catalogs, and some now have mobile apps and Adobe plugins. Many will also have e-mail newsletters to update on new things. MyFonts FontFont Typophile Letterhead Fonts Linotype FontShop – A great ...


27

Being under the illusion that I am somewhat of an expert on the long s¹, I mostly agree with your assessment. The only slight addition I would like to make are texts talking about historical texts. On German Language SE, several answers (such as this one) would look rather ugly if the long s weren’t supported by the font used for the site. If that is the ...


24

What is case? The discussion both in this question and in the one it inspired on ELU seems to conflate two distinct meanings of ‘uppercase’ and ‘lowercase’: Based purely on shape and size, originating in whether a glyph was originally usually stored in the typographer’s upper or lower case (= drawer). Based on functionality, describing what upper- and ...


22

Capital letters exist as our written and printed language has decided they should. The rules for usage of capital letters typically is for starting sentences and proper nouns. The rules simply don't apply to numerals. Hence, no need for there to be 'upper case' numbers. Your example of using ALL CAPS TO SHOW EMPHASIS is actually not an ideal way to show ...


21

There are a number of reasons for the gaps on the stencil letters: Not to collapse when wet with paint Ease to remove from the stenciling surface durability of the stencil itself The letters were often made with paper/metal/plastic and cut with mechanical die-cut punching, so the gaps made it easier to keep the stencil shapes correct during the process.


20

I suggest that you use BirdFont and follow these steps to import your work in the editor. Draw a triangle and a rectangle. Use them as test shapes to decide what your x-height should be. Compare your test glyphs to other fonts using the preview tab. (Ctrl+p) Turn on grid and guidelines for x-height and margin. Create four rectangular markers at the bottom ...


20

The right leg is reduced for thicker weights, eg. bolds and blacks, probably as optical corrections. Basicly, the thicker the weight, the smaller the leg. Myfonts offers a live preview where you type in your own text and they set this up in all the weights, so you can easily see the difference. Regular vs. black below (blue), then it gets proper straight ...


19

Open Source Font Editors: FontForge gbdfed Bitmap Font Editor BirdFont Freeware Font Editors: Font Struct Bit font Maker Type light Font Constructor Raster Font Editor Commercial Font Editors: FontCreator (Fontlab Studio) Font Management: 25 Font Management Tools Reviewed Search results for font management: What is a good free font management tool ...


18

Some background on me, so you can estimate how much or little authority I have: My native language (German) uses diacritics (ÄÖÜäöü) as well as non-diacritical special characters (ß) and is in the process of introducing or rejecting a new special character (ẞ, the capital eszett) right now. I did some research on the diacritical characters myself for the ...


15

Probably the best way to understand and get a feel for a 'normal' pound sign is to practice handwriting them, until you've got a sense of what comes naturally from the essential form and what is within normal variation. As I learned it as a UK schoolkid (this is me thinking step-by-step about what I do when I do it without thinking about it, so may not be ...


15

Yes you can do it. You do it through an OpenType feature called Contextual Alternates (calt). Sample code: feature calt { lookup calt1 { sub a' b by a.ss01 ; } calt1; } Basically, you tell the font: substitute a+b with a.ss01 + b This is a good overview of OpenType substitution features.


14

It's called kerning, which is an additional spacing applied to specific pairs of characters1. The aim is to have a perceived equal spacing between glyphs. Mathematically equal spacing based on the bounding box of each glyph doesn't always work since glyphs have very different shapes; some having a lot of empty space within the bounding box, and some hardly ...


13

If you do not want to switch to a different font, I see two quick and dirty options: As the font has a single ´ as a character, you can type s´ in your document and insert negative space in between the two, to correctly position the accent. In LibreOffice, You can do this via Format → Character → Position → Spacing → Condensed. For some reason, this is ...


13

It really tends to come down to flow: is the spacing even? Are there uneven blobs of color where everything gets to seem too thick or thin? Do strokes feel like they narrow to join evenly on the 'm' or 'n'? Do characters like @, $ and %, the parentheses and quotation marks, complement the design, or have they been clearly borrowed in from another font, or ...


12

It is not really going to stop (but the reason is not nesseserily design per se). The reason you have many similar different manufacturers of same looking font is same as why you have lots of manufacturers of subtly different nails. Ownership is defined in this case as copyright, so if you wanted a font that is subtly different, you need a entirely new font....


12

Short answer – no. There is a lot more to designing a font than just designing the glyphs and doing a "Save As". There are a number of things Illustrator or Inkscape can't do with regards to your new font - Spacing, kerning, hinting, metadata etc. That is why you need a font editor. Most type designers will draw the shapes directly in the font editor as ...


11

So, as Joonas mentions, the sign is apparently a capital letter L, with one or two crossbars to show that it is being used as a symbol or abbreviation. The L stands for the Latin word libra, the name of a Roman unit of weight, which also gave rise to the abbreviation lb for a pound as a measure of weight, and to the French word livre (source). The first £10 ...


11

There is no official or standardized answer to this, but many of the big players have undertaken mostly-independent efforts to extend or replace existing type specifications to include color, and it looks like many of those efforts are because of emoji support. Some of these companies' specifications, while not accepted as standard, have already been ...


11

While this may not directly answer your titular question, I hope that it somewhat solves your problem: The following techniques helped me reducing the work on manually kerning a font (which was blackletter; so standard kerning pairs did not apply): By far the most important one: Use kerning classes. While your font may have a lot of glyphs, many of them are ...


11

TrueType uses quadratic Bézier curves, while most other vector programs (including Glyphs and Illustrator) use cubic Bézier curves. You can see that your Glyphs example does not use quadratic Bézier curves as the handles of adjacent anchors do not connect. Now, quadratic Bézier curves are a special case of cubic Bézier curves¹ and thus the conversion from ...


10

Beyond the basic structure of the form, I don't think there is a "normal" of any type character. It's all merely a typeface choice. Like a dollar sign, the Pound has the same basic structure, bottom and middle stroke with a vertical that curves to form the top stroke. After all what does a "normal" T look like??? Doesn't that all depends upon the typeface? ...


10

Fontforge It can be a bit clunky on Windows and crash occasionally, but then it can do that sometimes on Linux, too. Keep backups. I edit all fonts directly in my Dropbox directory so I have access to a file history. Its user interface is strange and the author has no intention to fix that any time soon. Some parts of it, like the auto-hinting, are ...


10

OpenType technology doesn't allow randomness so ‘randomness’ must be simulated. OpenType ‘randomness’ can be simulated using groups of letters know as alternates. The idea that you could have 3 groups or more of the same letters that rotate; you’d expect to never see the same letter more than once in a word. Unfortunately due to letter combinations, ...


10

Yes, experts say around 2043 we'll hit 'peak typeface' and production will drop precariously. Oh, they'll still find deposits of original typeface ideas scattered here and there across the planet, but we can safely assume that for all intents and purposes, that's it. This is all the type we'll ever find. At that point, the graphic design industry will ...


10

Kerning of accented characters is still suboptimal with a freshly downloaded version of Gentium Plus. Note the collision in the pairs fà and ïb as well as the overly large gap between ľ and e in the below example. By contrast, Linux Libertine solves these problems by contextual forms (for the f), better kerning (between ľ and e) or does not encounter them in ...


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