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Same looking phenomenas which are not software effects: Chromatic aberration in camera lenses due low quality or intentional design for this effect Distortion when things are watched through non-uniformly thick glass or other transparent solid or liquid. RGB convergence error in cathode ray tube displays In all cases red, green and blue components of ...


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You can read about em on wikipedia. I'm basically just summarizing. Em is a unit which is relative to the font size. One em is the same as the height of the metal sort of the letter. (Even though we don't use metal sorts anymore, we still use the same geometrical principles.) Traditionally the metal sort for the letter "M" was as wide as it was tall - a ...


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The idea behind kerning classes is that they should contain glyphs that kern similarly or ideally identically in one direction (left or right). By grouping them together you avoid redundant work as you only have to decide how one of the members of the class kerns and then the others will automatically behave the same way. For example, in most typefaces, you ...


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The characters in your question (k, f, a, and e) are all of the usual suspects when it comes to italicizing a roman typeface. While not all fonts conform to these modifications in their italicized incarnation, these are in fact very traditional transformations and do indeed have precedent. Here are some examples of the various transformations a roman ...


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In general: you need to use OpenType features to make “intelligent” automatic replacements. So it needs to be an OpenType font. It can have a TTF or OTF suffix. Taking your Coca-Cola example, there are two ways to achieve this effect: you replace certain strings with ligatures. This can be two characters like Co or entire words (like Cola) or phrases (...


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Have you try to click on "old type kern" box in options windows in "generate fonts" windows.


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I think the base is Girls are Weird font with some modifications, keep in mind this typeface is used in embroidery and perhaps the image of the question has some distortion: Similar to Boyz R Gross See them at The Crazy Dazy Fonts


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First of all, italic doesn’t exactly mean oblique (a.k.a. slanted). Italics originate from a specific form of cursive handwriting, which usually implies obliqueness, but most importantly implies distinct letter forms (see, e.g., this answer). You cannot really have a semi-italic in that sense, since, e.g., you cannot have a one-and-a-half-storey a. But that ...


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Long ago, there were no uppercase and lowercase - hands (what predated typefaces, which predated fonts) had basically one or the other, and in most cases, what we now call uppercase were explicitly for carving into stone. The reason that the current conventional use of upper and lower case became common, along with punctuation, was to aide in legibility. ...


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Does "Justify All Lines" work for you? Select your text in the text box and use the option in the paragraph menu. (It works in InDesign CC, not sure about other versions).


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You need to have Allow selection of variable-pitched fonts checked. Also, bear in mind that changing the font would IS NOa T global setting, but rather a per session setting.


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For the bulk of it.... Select only the outer path and that counter (hole) where the strokes cross. You'll have to use the Direct Selection Tool (white arrow). Just click-drag outside the shape until you barely touch the edge. Choose Object > Lock from the menu. Still with the Direct Selection tool, click-drag across everything. Hit the Delete key. ...


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Only those holes, that 100% intersect with black fill, can be removed fast. But grunge on the edges can't be. There is only one way to achieve this with good quality – you need to draw path manually.


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Your question needs guesses. Here are some: you have not created a font, you have only printed and filled their template form with your own letters. Or equivalently you have filled the blank form in a computer with a drawing program you are not sure should you scan the filled paper form or save the computer drawing to PDF or something else and with what ...


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FontForge is crazy confusing, so here's the general "how to do this" answer in case it's helpful to anyone. First, understand that each rule in your Chaining Substitution list has this form: backClass | matchClass @<Lookup Table> | forwardClass The way a rule works is this: it checks each rule in sequence, looking for a match. If it finds a match, it ...


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A late addition: No need to find such font version altough you can easily build one in a font editor. Nobody else has it and you will easily cause a nasty disorder, if you happen to use it as font in a distributed writing. If you have vectors, you surely need also math formulas with them. Complex formulas (more than a sum or difference) need some equation ...


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The catchwords, in addition to having a decorative function, they have a practical origin as described in this answer. At the time of the manual typesetting, the characters were placed on a line, one by one and the other way around, following the order of reading. This tedious process forced to create new methods of composition to accelerate the process. ...


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Am I missing something obvious? Yes, you are designing a typeface where the uppercase and lowercase letters belong to two different families. If you can reason and match both, the subject of the inclination will come out easily. The uppercase is an Incise or Glyphic font family, also called the roman from the seventies, is a Sans Serif font with or without ...


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