46

What to search for The type style you're looking for is monospace. Wikipedia explains it well. A monospaced font, also called a fixed-pitch, fixed-width, or non-proportional font, is a font whose letters and characters each occupy the same amount of horizontal space. [...] Examples of monospaced fonts include Courier, Courier New, Lucida Console, Monaco, ...


17

Fonts have 2 characteristics that will affect character spacing: width and kerning. Kerning determines when two adjacent characters can overlap. For instance, when you write AT, the leftmost part of the T bar may actually be positioned LEFT of the lowest part of the right branch of the A. Although fixed width fonts may allow kerning, it is rarely the case. ...


12

The first thing to say, is that I want to be honest and I'm affiliate to the software I present bellow (I'm the software designer/programmer of this font identification engine) and I'm really proud about it :) It's not an online service but a software application that runs on your Mac or Windows PC: http://www.findmyfont.com It takes as input a Text image ...


10

Actually there are some pretty simple principles if your number one criteria is a high-readability font for a website. Think mainstream. Thanks to @font-face you could choose from thousands and thousands of fonts - but less popular or newer fonts often have rendering issues between browsers and operating systems, sometimes even when they come from ...


9

Joe Gillespie did some great micro screen font work under the MiniFonts moniker. These are still available via MyFonts. Silkscreen is a related design by Jason Kottke.


8

This answer is copied from Black and white emoji fonts – enfascination Noto Emoji Font Google has a fully internationalized font, Noto, whose emoji font has a black and white version: https://github.com/googlei18n/noto-emoji/tree/master/fonts The smiley’s are blobs. EmojiOne EmojiOne is a color font with black and white fallbacks. I couldn’t figure out how ...


6

There are a few ways to reduce the size of a TTF file, but most of them require that you know the consequences, since they are lossy. Firstly, you can subset the font, which means to remove any glyphs (character images) that you don't need. If you have a font that covers several languages and you only need to support one language, then this can be for you. ...


6

Try this one (although it is not yet complete for all the Google fonts): http://joelcrawfordsmith.com/closest-font/


5

Here are two links.. i found these useful to find the fonts.. but you have to select font's image of reasonable size. http://www.whatfontis.com/ http://www.myfonts.com/WhatTheFont/ I hope this will help you if you have only images (font's JPGs etc) then first you will need to know the name of that font. And there are 50+% chances to find the font names ...


5

Ok I'm going to go ahead and give my thoughts on this. There is no ultimate 'best font' nor can there be because choosing a font depends on many different aspects. What there can be is a 'best method for choosing a font'. So things to consider to help choose the best font for your project; Media: How will the font be displayed, paper, canvas, online, ...


5

This connects to my question from a few weeks back. I feel there is still not a great answer for "How do I determine when a webfont can cut it vs when to use graphic type?" I outlined how I make that determination, though it's still fuzzy. The bottom line is, you need to test webfonts in multiple browsers on multiple systems as early in the design process ...


5

I recently did this in FontForge, inspired by this article by A List Apart. While you could theoretically put the glyphs anywhere, it's probably preferable to put them into Unicode private use areas, because that way if the font doesn't render you're not stuck with a letter 'a' or whatever. Install FontForge...good luck; that's half the battle. Once you're ...


5

AFAIK, answer to both questions is 'yes, go ahead'. A warning, though: don't mix up the css rule font-family with th css technique @font-face. font-family is the first example you give, which will cause the browser to search for the typeface on the visitor's machine and proceeding with the next font when failing. This is also called a 'font stack'. @font-...


5

Can I use the font on the website using the @font-family rule? Depends on the font license. You need to read the license that came with the font file. Like I found on a website like this: font-family: "Century Gothic","Apple Gothic",AppleGothic,"URW Gothic L","Avant Garde",Futura,sans-serif; That's not necessarily using an embedded @font-family. That ...


4

Lots of great pixel fonts at FontsForFlash.com


4

If you have the font on your machine to make the letter but didn't pay for it, then installing the font was your infringement. But there is no copyright protection on the shape of letters: Under U.S. law, typefaces and the letter forms or glyphs they comprise are considered to be utilitarian objects whose utility outweighs any merit that may exist in ...


4

If the active word here is "perfectly," then the answer is almost certainly no, for reasons that have little to do with the fonts themselves. Font rendering is notoriously difficult across operating systems and even across browsers at times. Even if the font is well-tuned, an XP rig with ClearType turned off is going to negate it. However, I know ...


4

Always look at what the license says. If it specifically allows use of font on webpages, then it's not your concern if other users are able to access the font file.


3

Apple actually uses a custom variation of the Myriad Pro font called "Myriad Set." The custom variation extends the Myriad Pro family with additional weights and glyphs. See my answer here for sources.


3

Myriad Pro is the answer, just figured it out..


3

There are a fair amount of options on the market now for building fonts. From your question, it appears that you're after webfonts in particular. Most of the modern tools will create a webfont for you, or you can run a desktop font through FontSquirrel's webfont generator. My preferred process is paper > Illustrator > FontLab. There's a rather detailed ...


3

There sure is! Just use http://icomoon.io. It's a free webfont creation tool that works with SVG packs, as well.


3

Here is an alternative. Not perfect, but close to Copperplate. Balthazar: http://www.google.com/webfonts/specimen/Balthazar


3

Looks like a tightly tracked Avant Garde Bold Oblique: Could be either Avant Garde again or a Futura Bold, hard to well with only three characters: Looks like Eagle Black, tightly tracked with the counters removed: Unknown, maybe someone else will recognise it. Hard to say with only two characters, looks similar to Gotham or Proxima Nova. I'm going with ...


3

Most typefaces are sold as an entire set, so yes, you'd need to purchase the entire typeface. In the grand scheme of things, a typeface shouldn't be a make it or break it part of the budget. It's just yet another tool that you'd be using to produce the final product. All that said, there are alternatives. For instance, House Industries' PhotoLettering ...


2

I don't know if you speak Chinese or not, but in case you know what you are doing, you could subset the font and reduce it to the 3000-4000 most used glyphs. This should be enough to render most standard Chinese texts and could significantly reduce the file size (a Chinese font might come with over 20,000 glyphs). Do this only in case you master Chinese at ...


2

There's several issues here. SkarpaLT appears to be designed as a display face. Most thin letterforms are designed for that...posters, headlines, etc.--basically where you'd use them large. They aren't designed to be used as small text faces. Most screens are still rather low-resolution. The smaller the type, the harder it is to render it cleanly on a pixel-...


2

Helvetica Regular is the default typeface for most of Apple’s apps that can print, including Pages, TextEdit and Numbers. Apple typically uses a mixture of Helvetica and Lucida Grande for their UI. A lot of Apple’s marketing material is set in Myriad Pro. iOS is mostly Helvetica.


2

I believe that Serif fonts tend to be easier on the eyes for longer periods of reading. For a better reading experience, I think a serif font like Adobe Garamond works well. It's not as "blah" as Times. There are some interesting curves in the serifs that helps make it a bit more "purty" as far as serif fonts go. Here is an article on the subject that I ...


2

There's no way to get a web font to look the same on every browser and every operating system. They all have different rendering engines, defaults, font smoothing methods, etc. I'm also not sure of this, but do investigate the accessibility of SVG fonts. They may have some issues (someone correct me if I am wrong).


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