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7

The linked font contains the "normal" glyphs as uppercase letters and mirrored copies as lowercase.


5

You somehow managed to leave the feature field of your lookup empty: If you change this field’s content to kern, everything should be working as expected. Explanation: Lookups are controlled with features associated to them. Some of those features are activated by default in most programs and contexts (e.g., kern is activated by default for horizontal text,...


4

Ctrl + \ or Element -> Transformations -> Transform


4

I have resolved the issue, the culprit was the font's PostScript name (which I naively never changed). I'm guessing it has to do with the caching of fonts based on PostScript names or something. I don't understand it exactly. To change the PostScript name, I've used FontLab Studio 5. In Studio 5, there's a "Font Info" icon to the top left of the "Font" ...


3

The idea behind kerning classes is that they should contain glyphs that kern similarly or ideally identically in one direction (left or right). By grouping them together you avoid redundant work as you only have to decide how one of the members of the class kerns and then the others will automatically behave the same way. For example, in most typefaces, you ...


3

It seems the features I need requires to generate an OpenType font, not TrueType. Am I right? Yes and no. The main difference between the otf and ttf file extensions (as usually used) is not the support of OpenType but things like the degree of Bézier curves, hinting information, and so on. Both formats can support OpenType. It seems that this may not be ...


3

A font file usually contains only vector information on the shapes of glyphs. Some fonts also come with so-called bitmap strikes for different font sizes though, which are usually hand-corrected for the best rendering. I guess that you have such a font and only changed the vector information while the bitmaps are unchanged. In some programs you now see the ...


3

In the toolbar, go to Element > Correct Direction. That fixes it.


2

From Microsoft's OpenType spec (emphasis mine): An alternate substitution identifies functionally equivalent but different looking forms of a glyph. These glyphs are often referred to as aesthetic alternatives. For example, a font might have five different glyphs for the ampersand symbol, but one would have a default glyph index in the cmap table. The ...


2

I managed to create a FontForge font that exhibits the same error message. However, I had to manipulate the file manually (i.e., with a text editor), as FontForge didn’t allow me to make this mistake. Therefore it is not extremely unlikely that whatever caused this error for you also caused other problems. This error indicates that you assigned two glyphs ...


1

Have you try to click on "old type kern" box in options windows in "generate fonts" windows.


1

In the glyph view, find the component that dictates the locked metrics (bearings). For example, if your composite glyph is Ẋ, this will be the X. Select this component; right-click. Choose Get Info from the menu that should appear. Uncheck Use my Metrics. You should now be able to adjust the bearings while still using the shapes and relative positions of ...


1

FontForge is crazy confusing, so here's the general "how to do this" answer in case it's helpful to anyone. First, understand that each rule in your Chaining Substitution list has this form: backClass | matchClass @<Lookup Table> | forwardClass The way a rule works is this: it checks each rule in sequence, looking for a match. If it finds a match, it ...


1

FontForge can draw circles, but the circle primitive does not exist for font outlines. So they get automatically converted to a somewhat close shape using Bézier curves. While it's possible to approximate a perfect circle with Bézier curves, it is proven to be mathematically impossible. There is no advantage over using either cubic or quadratic curves, as ...


1

If you have the time, I urge you to ignore suggestions to don't-even-try-and-use-something-already-done, and at least try to do the new thing you propose. Thus, you can start by reading The OpenType Cookbook in order to understand how the features, lookups, substitutions, etc. work. Then read more and keep asking if you need help. As far as I know, it is ...


1

Not sure if this is worth looking at, but apparently if you have Illustrator or Photoshop, there's a plugin for creating Open Type fonts directly in those applications: https://www.fontself.com/ Blurb from the website: Fontself Maker is an add-on for Photoshop & Illustrator CC that brings you font creation superpowers. Enjoy a new skill in ...


1

It looks like you have a stroke set on your letter form. In Inkscape just remove the stroke before you save the SVG. Example 1: importing an SVG into FontForge with stroke and fill set in Inkscape. The result is three paths. Example 2: importing an SVG into FontForge with only fill applied, and no stroke in Inkscape. The result is a single path.


1

This depends, on the way you made the fonts. Font forge can load your letters, but you need to export them in a format that it can read. I suggest using EPS, although SVG can also work out fine. You need to export each letter separately. You can make the process faster if you save each letter in a file named uni####.eps where the #### is a Unicode code ...


1

YEEEES, finally here is the solution, because it was not a problem of empty field for me : When you generate the font, you have to tick the 'OpenType old kernel mode' option in the Options dialog. So : click generate, click "option", check that "old mode", generate and that's it ^^ Now it works with LibreOffice and Unity3D, perfect. Thanks to Dave ...


1

There is/was also a problem with exporting SVGs from illustrator regarding the exported viewBox when resizing the artboard - which is what you do in step 2 of your workflow (More Info/Questions about this issue). The solution could be to copy/paste every character into a new file, align the (character-)paths to the top left corner and then use the Object >...


1

Font Metrics... Fonts have a UPM (Units Per Em) value that define their coordinates. The value is usually 1,000 for PostScript fonts and either 1,024 or 2,048 for TruType fonts but it doesn't have to be. In your 'font info' dialog your accent heights are set to 969 so at a guess the font UPM is probably 1,000. Try changing your accent and cap height to 1,...


1

Element → Validation → Validate complains about open paths and selects the end notes for you. Note that this is the Element menu from the font view, not from the glyph view. (For your font, it will complain about a lot more things; consider them.)


1

As Unicode has strived to replace all the existing standards with some success, I would recommend using it. I have worked and maintained a font using Unicode for some time and am not aware of any issues that arise from this. With everything else, I would not be surprised if you run into compatibility issues. There is a lot, which isn’t covered by ISO-8859-1 ...


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