32

To scoop up all suggestions in the comments and add my own reasons, here goes: Quality Paid fonts are higher in quality, on average than free ones. Remember that saying: 'Pay peanuts, and you get monkeys'? It applies to fonts as well. Paid fonts most probably have more features than free ones, just like most other software. Examples are lowercase; glyphs ...


32

When you open the TTF webfont in use on Google websites, you get some metadata and a link to this URL: https://www.google.com/fonts/license/productsans It says: Google offers many fonts on open source terms. This is not one of them. Please see www.google.com/fonts.


29

Why should someone pay for your designs? Because you have talent, knowledge, invested time and you can create something unique that someone else can't. The same is true for type designers and their product. They don't give away their quality product for free because the invested a lot. Most free (gratis) fonts are very low quality. Imagine doing an ...


22

You are asking a few questions here: Is simply typesetting a company name in a font a logo? Yes, it certainly can be. Is it the best solution? Sometimes, but often it's not the best solution. Can I send a copy of a commercial font I used to a client? No. If it's a commercial font, meaning you purchased a license, then if the client wants to use the ...


21

First of all, it is possible to simple have a typographic logo solution. Logos do not have to be graphic marks or use an original font. If your client is happy with what you've made as a standalone logo, then you should be able to create outlines out of the logo and send him a vector form of the logo without going against the copyright. However, perhaps you'...


20

It'll depend. Some companies will own the font outright (being a font they paid to have created). Some companies will have a license for the commercial font that they can allow their vendors to use (designers and printers). Some companies won't have either. At that point you have a few options. If it's a font you think would be useful elsewhere--you ...


17

Short answer: you should use the typeface that is right for the job. Maybe that's a free font. Maybe it's not. Longer answer: Disadvantages of (many, not all) free fonts: limited character set limited weights and styles they tend to be over-used and can dilute your brand image because of that limited range of variety Advantages of (many, not all) paid ...


16

It's legal to ask the browser to use Helvetica Neue if it's available on the system, but you'd need a license if you want to serve the font yourself. One option is to use Helvetica Neue if it's system-installed and fall back to some other sans-serif font like Arial if it's not.


16

In the specific case of Gotham (or just about any other font made by Hoefler and Frere-Jones with the exception of Hoefler Text and maybe a couple of others), they don't sell through third parties. So, any site that wants to sell it to you for cheap or free is not legit. In more general terms, it's better to assume that a free font site is guilty until ...


16

The reason is when you're buying the font for a desktop, it can be used to author text on one or two machines, by one person. When you have a game the game authors those texts on many machines so the situation is the same as if you'd buy a license for each player separately. So as long as the font has a pay per usage model a game would constitute many uses. ...


16

It's completely fine to use them. Google Fonts are all open source, so you can use them for whatever you like. However, they are mostly screen fonts. In other words, they're mostly designed to look decent on a display. They have big lower-case letters, wide spacing between characters, no fine strokes that wouldn't render on screen and so on. Most are sans-...


14

Each and every foundry has an End User license Agreement (EULA) for their fonts. They all vary to some degree. Some EULAs may forbid the client from ever sending you files to begin. Some EULAs state (paraphrasing) that sharing in order to "facilitate reproduction" is acceptable, but nothing is to be retained after reproduction. Really, only reading the ...


12

Yes you can. From About Google Fonts (emphasis mine): All of the fonts are Open Source. This means that you are free to share your favorites with friends and colleagues. You can even customize them for your own use, or collaborate with the original designer to improve them. And you can use them in every way you want, privately or commercially — in print, ...


11

I guess the only possible answer is to either: check the originating foundry's site (H&FJ in this case) and buy from them an alternative supplier they link to (not relevant in this case) use well-known suppliers with high reputation (Fontshop, MyFonts etc) It is unlikely that the exact same font will both be sold and given away free.


11

This font is commercial property and is not allowed to use without proper licensing for usage. Linotype licensing


11

Depending on the Font you're probably out of lucky. Most Font Licenses do not allow for distribution for example the foundry, House Industries, has the following terms: ABOUT DEVICES The base purchase price of your House Industries fonts includes a license for use on ten (10) devices owned by the same entity or individual. A device is defined as a ...


9

Clarification: We are designers, for real answers you should ask a lawyer. First thing I would consider is: Were you paid by the company to design this typeface, or did you have it before you used it for the project? If you were paid to do it, then the type's right probably belongs to the company, and not to you (depends on your contract). You can most ...


9

While all fonts on Google Fonts are open source, the actual restrictions on their use depend on the specific open source license they're released under, which varies between fonts — there is no single license that would apply to all of Google Fonts. The most common licenses on Google Fonts seem to be the SIL Open Font License and the Apache License 2....


8

Is it legal for me to do that since I don't have license for those font/typeface? (Univers, Rockwell, Berkeley) Depends on the license. Assuming the school properly licensed them in the first place, they were likely 'for student use only' licenses. If the not profit have the ability to print unlimited, do they need to pay for the font? They need to pay ...


7

You may consider alternatives to the Helvetica Neue, like the ones listed here http://theultralinx.com/2013/03/5-google-web-font-alternatives-helvetica-arial.html


7

Yes. To both instances. Commercial licenses allow you to use the font commercially. In other words, you are allowed to make money off of designs which use commercially licensed fonts. If you are charging anyone anything for the items you are creating with the fonts, you need a commercial license. The license is granted to the individual or company ...


6

This is a legal question rather than a design question, which unfortunately this community is not very well positioned to help you with, since we are not all lawyers (although some of us may be!) and the jurisdiction really varies between states and/or countries. That said, "personal use" is too vague, and dafont/fontspace have countless fonts of ...


6

To clarify, there are two different licenses: desktop and web. If you have the font on your desktop (legally) you can create graphics for your site with it. You can even specify it in your CSS with fall backs so that it displays for those who also have it on their desktop but degrades gracefully for those who don't. When you choose to embed the font on ...


6

My understanding is No. The page view cap is there to gain further money for Adobe if you need more page views. It has absolutely nothing to do with bandwidth or foundry licensing. Adobe has plenty of servers and bandwidth to serve everything and they are the foundry. Adobe would see embedding a Typekit font, with anything other than their own embed code, ...


6

Typically a computer font may be regarded as a program that converts a machine-readable piece of text into an image thereof. While it is possible to apply almost any kind of license to a font, and some licenses might give a font owner a partial copyright interest in the images produced thereby, a more common form of licensing would state--as would copyright ...


6

If you are hired to do a job for a client, and they have specific style guides, such as font and colors, it is up to them to provide you with everything that is required by their business standards. Therefore, if they are using a specific custom font, they should be able to provide you with it. If they own the license to it, they are free to use it within ...


6

The short answer is yes (if you're using Typekit legitimately as part of your subscription to Adobe CC). Here are a couple of useful FAQs directly from the Typekit site: Can I use synced fonts for commercial projects or client work, such as creating business cards and logos? Yes. You can create digital designs or print work for your own use or for ...


6

Google does not permit any kind of use of Product Sans for any third parties. Here is the license of the font: Google offers many fonts under open source licenses. This is not one of them. Please see fonts.google.com for options you can use. As you can see, it doesn't explicitly grant any permission to use the font. When thinking with a strictly legal ...


5

The way you authenticate a piece of software (a font is a piece of software) is you have a receipt of purchase and a license agreement on paper stored on file. Without these 2 options its nearly impossible to verify ownership. In case of digital stuff you still need to have a paper copy of the money transaction and the license key. Then the vendor can ...


5

I know this is an old question but still quite interesting too see that Microsoft decided not to either opensource their fonts or make them available for purchase. Unfortunately, even now it is not possible to legally use any of the Segoe UI or Segoe WP family fonts in your own materials (commercially or otherwise), it is also impossible to take the ones ...


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