15

Subtle differences look like careless mistakes and sloppiness, not just in fonts but in all designs. When things are just slightly off, its enough people notice, but not enough people think its a deliberate thought out decision. Here is Arial Black with Source Sans Pro Semibold. They clash because they're both trying to be clean sans-serif fonts and in ...


14

Understanding typography is vital to being successful in graphic design. The first step of great typography comes in choosing the right typeface. You can only choose the right typeface if you keep the nature of the content and target audience in mind. Here are five guidelines for picking and using fonts 1. What is the mood you want to convey? Are you ...


9

They are very similar typefaces. There are a few differences that make PT Sans more suitable for headings and Open Sans more suitable for body text however. Open Sans has a larger x-height, larger counters, glyph widths are wider, and overall spacing is more generally open—all things which help with legibility and readability at smaller sizes and for longer ...


9

DA01 and Dom are pointing at the central problem: They conflict when they don't look good together. So how do you know what looks good? That's such an obnoxiously subjective thing. But, like so many areas of design, typography is subjective. You have to train your eye for this soft skill the hard way. Go be a typographer Set a lot of type Let pros ...


8

Tricky. I agree with @Horatio that "texture" is a better word than "personality". First, I would say that the same font as a heading and as main text actually gives a different "feel": a font changes personality depending on mass and size. In a way; a personality depends on how it is used. This is in part because good fonts are designed in different sizes:...


8

There's a vague guideline: contrast in some aspects, lack of contrast in others. You want your reader to be able to smoothly read on, but you want the difference in typeface to be clearly noticeable even to a casually observing layperson. When combining two typefaces in a single line, make sure that there is enough contrast between the two: Make sure the ...


7

A quick search for "fonts that come in serif and sans-serif format" returned this website: Superfamily Font Roundup: 40+ Serif and Sans Font Pairings Reading what he wrote states: There isn't a clearly standardized name for serif/sans-serif paired families, but from what I can find, superfamily is the term most commonly used. You may also find references ...


5

Make sure they aren't too similar. Make sure they aren't too different. Break both rules when necessary (at your discretion).


4

You're looking for a large x-height, open shapes, and a warm demeanor. To keep it simple and readily available I'd recommend one of these: Frutiger Myriad Open Sans


4

Is the personality subjective and individual interpretation based? Yes what key elements of a font are considered when indicating the personality? It depends, since it is subjective and individual interpretation based. Is there a tool available? Your opinion, mainly. Does a font's personalty change for each style or is there a common base? It ...


4

In situations where you have a face with very strong personality, the best approach for a companion face is to go to the opposite extreme: a plain sans that isn't trying to assert itself. Kursivschrift has relatively narrow proportions with a severely vertical axis and no slope, so that it almost looks like it's leaning backwards. Its x-height is large. ...


3

I think a nice sans-serif, thin line font would complement the bold, thick lettering that Bookman is giving. My suggestion is Avenir LT Std, or a Century Gothic: The large x-height is in reference to legibility usually, but it also affords a bit more space with the kearning because of the shape of the letter forms.


3

I have seen a number of books successfully pairing Garamond with such a Japanese font. This style of font is called kyōkasho tai (kyōkasho = "textbook", tai = "typeface") and is used, as the name would suggest, in Japanese textbooks. Its shapes are not stylized as in the minchō fonts (right): and resemble the character that is actually written by hand. (...


3

One of the problems with Caslon is that it's very old-fashioned. That is obviously what has attracted you to using it, but its age and the style of the time is that the tracking is naturally quite wide: When trying to get a sans to go with that, which is a good idea, you need to consider the letter-shapes (like the high cross-bar on e and the upward slope ...


3

The common typographic practice is to reverse the italics, that is, to use the non-italic version of the typeface to emphasize something within italics. Using a different typeface will most probably not convey the meaning you want to the reader. More info: italics within italics at Wikipedia


3

Disclaimer: I am not a fan of 'school' handwritings, so my negative opinion on Learning Curve may sound through in this post. Let's start out with the observation that Learning Curve is not a very elegant typeface. To me, it very much evokes a schoolclass feel: it's the script I (and lots of my generation) were taught to write in. That means that we have to ...


3

I'd like to mention that it is not really a necessity to pair typefaces at all. Working with a single typeface (in two or three distinct weights maybe) is totally fine. Generations of Swiss designers (among many others) have created some of the worlds best designs and CI with just a single typeface. IMO font pairing is suitable for classic sans/serif ...


2

Using Courier as the basis for comparison, the criteria were: less wide than Courier less exaggerated (more constrained) than Courier Based on this criteria, I would suggest experimenting with the following monospace fonts: Ubuntu Mono Has a nice high x-height with a bit of a condensed look and a few different cuts to use. Audimat Mono A bit less ...


2

First off, nice blackletter font, I can tell that you've spent a long time developing and enhancing it. So, let's try and identify a solution to your font-pairing problem. I think the first thing is to identify some further needs for this font. I think you'll find that it's also very important to have a font that is based online (a web font). Since you have ...


2

I am not really a fan of the adage that says you should pair serifs with sans etc.; that you need a great contrast to make text work, I think it is nonsense. Though you need a light hand and a sensitive touch to get it right. I am going to skip the serif-and-sans entirely. I see no reason why you cannot do sans-on-sans. A block of text is more about ...


2

I think this is a great question, as it describes the unique position design takes between Art and Craft/Trade. While there are plenty of generally accepted rules in design (colour harmonies, readability, use of grids...) there is always an element of aesthetic choice to design work. Often this is what makes the work exceptional. Take David Carsons work, ...


2

Since you have "reputable" in your question, I will propose one commercial solution. It is not(!) online in the sense of free access, but you can purchase it online and start using withing minutes. I am talking about a book or ressource (regularly updated if I understand correctly) which claims to write in detail about pairing. Here is the blurb ...


1

First learn the terms which define typography variations. (Here's a decent link for that - and another- or Google search for "basic typography terminology") In order to actually identify any typeface, you need to understand exactly what defines that type face... its serifs or lack there of, its counters, its descenders, ascenders, tails, terminals, kerning, ...


1

“it's harmonious to have the header and body text have similar x-heights” Who says that? Let those people make a case for their claim. You don’t have to come up with reasons or ask around. “using a high x-height font in body text will increase legibility” In the simplified way this is usually understood, I consider it a myth and I explained that in detail ...


1

It's not really a hard and fast rule, it's just a good idea. But also a lot of times fonts that are very different from each other look great. I wouldn't want to pair a header font with a small x-height with a body font with a large x-height if they look similar, but if there's a lot of contrast between the two, it will probably have a big impact. For ...


1

No, you're not breaking design rules. You can mix and match fonts with various x-heights; what's important is to look at the page and see if it's readable.


1

The best font depends on your output. If the manual is being printed you may have some restrictions. If a serif is too small it has the potential to bleed, especially depending on the paper it's printed on, which will influence your choice. You may need a font that has designed ink traps (take a look at Matthew Carter's TED talk, he discusses ink traps ...


1

Try Gotham - probably Book weight - large x-height, open shapes, not too obscure and won't look dated for a few years.


1

Futura is a classic with a modern look, not outdated, very versatile, has many different weight and styles too and I guess it could be considered lively. Not really calligraphic I suppose. And there's Mesmerize that is a bit less straight and more calligraphic, and what I also consider lively. And Kabel if you want more curves and angles! __ Opinion: If ...


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