13

5pt is not a readable size, especially if any bleeding or misalignment occurs. Why don't you just print some tests out? Its not like you're printing a poster or billboard. Any printer is big enough to let you test business cards. Also there is no Ideal Size you have to look at it and determine how it fits with your image, your audience, and the text it ...


11

The recommended sizes for print are 10-12pt however this is dependent on the typeface being used also as the structure (cap height, x-height, etc. (if you want more information on that this is a nice starting point) varies from typeface to typeface. For the body 11pt is typically a good size but you must remember to keep your audience at the front of your ...


9

Joe Gillespie did some great micro screen font work under the MiniFonts moniker. These are still available via MyFonts. Silkscreen is a related design by Jason Kottke.


9

For any print, regardless of format, the optimal legbility is around font size 11pt, with ~15pt leading and ~60 characters per line (including spaces). These are of course dependent upon your target audience and other factors (like Ryan mentions). An example would be a publication aimed at seniors: they will prefer a slightly bigger font. Of course, als ...


8

TL;DR What you are asking about is called optical sizes. It is the optimisation of typefaces to the size at which they will be viewed – in relation to the viewer’s field of vision, not the pixel resolution. For example, ideally you wouldn’t use the same glyph shapes for footnotes and headlines. What optical sizes are not Optical sizes have nothing to do ...


7

Photoshop does not treat 1px = 1 pt. Except at a specific situation. This is when the image is set to 72 ppi + you are using pt as a unit + you have the point/pica set to 72 pt/inch. The explanation is that if you set the ppi to 72, it matches the idea that you can have 72 points on each inch. You can see this in action changing this values in Photoshop (...


6

Some tips which may help: Mixing all caps and word caps is a bad idea unless there is a specific design consideration. In your sample, it's just bad. Logos which consist of a standard typeface are often seen as uninspiring because the typeface can be seen anywhere. Like any symbol, as much care and attention should be given to any text. Often type should be ...


6

I had the same problem when trying to determine the ideal font size for a specific website layout. At a moment I came across a tool, the Golden Ratio Typography Calculator. It calculates the ideal font metrics related to the content width, by applying the Golden Ratio rule. Now, because there is a relation between web and print dimensions, you can use the ...


6

Note that most of the following is nothing but an educated guess. I do not know what actually motivated the Typeplate scale If you mulitply 18 repeatedly with ∛2 ≈ 1.26 you get the following sequence which, when rounded to “standard” font sizes yields the Typeplate scale with some exceptions: 18.0 → 18 22.7 → 21 28.6 → 24 – This is out of place, 28 would ...


6

I believe it is called an "Inline Citation" or "In-Text Citation" https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/02/ Here: http://www.easybib.com/guides/citation-guides/chicago-turabian/notes/ I believe they could be referring to the "same thing" but lacking an actual citation (as in your example) simply as a "note". Update: During some further research ...


5

Generally a programming language will have a device context which will allow you to draw some example text and then measure it's width and height. For example in python, using wxPython GUI toolkit: import wx dc = wx.ScreenDC() #yourFont = wx.Font(10, wx.DEFAULT, wx.NORMAL, wx.NORMAL, True) #dc.SetFont(yourFont) w,h = dc.GetTextExtent('X') Regardless of ...


5

Bootstrap is intended to be edited. They have a LESS variable list of overrides including the base font size, which then can get increased/decreased depending on your font choice and preference. Those sizes are then adjusted using mathmetical logic for other assets (like buttons, headings, menus, etc). In addition, you could change everything about the ...


5

That's a can of worms you're opening here. I'd say the jury's still out. As far as font size is concerned, this study (pdf) concludes that there were no significant differences (for sizes 6-16) in reading performance or accuracy due to either passage length or age there was variation in subjects’ preferences on the text sizes used. They compared a ...


5

The answer to most any "when should I use typestyle X" is: when it looks appropriate. That said, note that condensed faces are typically considered display faces. They're not necessarily meant for use as a text face, but rather for things like headers and headlines. Newspapers especially like them because you can fit a lot more into a headline with a ...


5

The best workaround I found: Set font size up to maximum 1296 pt Select text object Go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform... Check Preview box Scale up text object as you need Now you can scale up text object to any size and keep it fully editable while font size is still 1296 pt. That's a good news, but the problem is that the text object it-...


5

You don't mention which printing method you are going to use, so I'll assume you mean ordinary offset print. The type of paper and the size of the sheets also matter. I've had luck with small white text on rich black background on a record cover which was printed on small sheets, but if I were to make a book which I knew would printed on larger sheets, I ...


4

Helvetica is very closely related to (in fact derived from) Clarendon. I'd try that route. Clarendon: Akzidenz Grotesk (see comments): Helvetica:


4

You could use a technique popular in North Korea. Whenever leader Kim Jong-un is mentioned, his name is automatically displayed ever so slightly bigger than the text around it. Not by much, but just enough to make it stand out. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-20445632 It's a great way to add emphasis for Dear Leader, or any text you desire.


4

Lots of great pixel fonts at FontsForFlash.com


4

Use a character style and set the scale appropriately. Place guides at the baseline and x-height of the base font to help you do the alignment. Then in the character style of the second font, under Advanced Character Formats, set an equal horizontal and vertical scale so that the x-heights align. For example: "Porttitor" is set in a different typeface with ...


4

Many designers will leave applications at their default setting - which is typically 120% of type size (at least for Adobe software). How or when to alter this is highly dependent upon many things: Actual typeface Some typefaces inherently demand more or less line spacing. 120% for some typefaces can cause ascenders/descenders to overlap. While for other ...


3

I had this same issue when I was making my business cards a few weeks ago. I didn't want to be smaller than 10pt for fear that it wouldn't be readable. However, after printing out some tests I found that 8pt was the perfect size - still readable and everything fit nicely on the card. You could do all one size (IE 8pt) and then bold/italics/different color ...


3

I'd like to add some points to the answers. The issue of age related changes in refraction (the possibility of the eyes to bend light rays) is mostly related to the state of the crystalline lens - organ inside the eye which can bend light rays depending on the object's distance (this function called accommodation). In young people the lens is gel-like, but ...


3

11px equates to roughly 8.25pt - I reckon you've got your Illustrator Units set to pt but expecting it to read the px value. To change the units Illustrator uses for type go the Edit Menu > Preferences > Units and changed the Type dropdown to Pixels.


3

Better, but not good It's been a while since this question was asked. In that time, web fonts and screen font rendering has continued to make strong progress. Even the default Bootstrap theme still holds up: In your original screen shot, the font used appears to be Arial. This is a Windows fall-back for Helvetica, the 1st priority font (as seen in my ...


3

I don't think the demographics split quite so cleanly every 20 years and then have a corresponding font size to go along with it. In general, most print type hovers around the 9pt-11pt size. That's likely too small for those getting older, hence the reading glasses market. For the web, the ideal type size for everyone is: 1em / 100% That would be the ...


3

Or is it actually that font size doesn’t really mean a lot regarding the real size of individual characters Yes. That's the reason. This is how fonts looked originally: The type size referred the height of the block of metal the glyph was placed on--not the size of the letter itself. All fonts at 72 point were cast in blocks of metal 72 points high. ...


3

The minimum legal text size will vary depending on the type of product, where it is going to be sold and the nature of the copy in question. For instance, the Food Industry Regulations in Europe specify that all mandatory legal text (ingredients, allergy warnings, nutritional values, etc) must have a minimum x-height of 1.2mm (unless the pack is very small ...


3

Press CTRL+K Go to Units & Rulers Go to Type and select Pixels


3

Text legibility affects its readability. Rather than suggest point sizes alone, look at those factors that affect ease of reading. case: upper & lower case mix is more readable than all caps x-height: larger is more readable than smaller leading: more is more readable than solid line length: shorter (10-12 words) are more easily readable than longer ...


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