8

The CSS font-weight is influenced by Linotype numbering system. As you can learn from the wiki, every digit in the number describes different characteristic of the typeface and from this point CSS adopted Lynotype in part... The 100 to 900 system works for some fonts, but fails for other, thus you should always check this in advance before using particular ...


6

Linotype made it to CSS over Panose system partly because of licensing concerns. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PANOSE. The Panose number is used in TrueType, OpenType and SVG fonts and contains infromation about weight, proportion, contrast etc. The Panose weight number is more or less the same system as the Linotype/CSS. From very light to extra black. ...


4

Some big design principles are: Contrast Alignment Proximity (There's more but these are the ones I find apply the most in this particular case) Contrast would entail the weight as well as color. Playing around with these principles helps separate one element from another. My biggest point is: play around with the design. Try different things and pick ...


4

Web-fonts There are 2 ways you can go about defining web-fonts with @font-face. The first, and probably most common (I believe most generators, Font Squirrel for example, will output this) is to define each font file (i.e. each weight and style) with its own unique family name. @font-face { font-family: 'YourFont'; src: url('your_font.ttf') format('...


3

There is the List Fonts script A very basic PhotoShop script to list all fonts used in the currently open and active PSD. The script looks at all text layers, and will also find multiple fonts from the same text layer. The results are shown in a dialog box, the contents of which can be selected, copied and pasted. There are also more extensive tools to ...


3

Not really. It's best to actually purchase a font with the weights you wish to use. That being posted, you could just apply a stroke layer style to a text layer I suppose. Of course, this may slightly round the corners of some characters.


3

Typefaces need to be formatted to tell the programs using them which font in the set is Regular, or which is Bold, or which is Italic, or which is Bold + Italic. Not all typefaces are formatted this way. If the font you are using in InDesign does not allow the shortcut, it usually means that the typeface has not "told" InDesign which font in the typeface ...


1

This cannot be done, the PSD text layers are converted to bitmap in Gimp and the text information is lost.


1

If you are looking for an overview of just the font names this link was helpful. Also I tried specKing above and found it helpful as quick detail info for specific text-layers


1

I found the solution I was in search of. The Inkscape equivalent to "Expanding the text" is "Object to Path (CTRL + SHIFT + C). I used this command for all text in the logo, saved, and it renders correctly in my HTML now.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible