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Open Source Font Editors: FontForge gbdfed Bitmap Font Editor BirdFont Freeware Font Editors: Font Struct Bit font Maker Type light Font Constructor Raster Font Editor Commercial Font Editors: FontCreator (Fontlab Studio) Font Management: 25 Font Management Tools Reviewed Search results for font management: What is a good free font management tool ...


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Fontforge It can be a bit clunky on Windows and crash occasionally, but then it can do that sometimes on Linux, too. Keep backups. I edit all fonts directly in my Dropbox directory so I have access to a file history. Its user interface is strange and the author has no intention to fix that any time soon. Some parts of it, like the auto-hinting, are ...


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Unfortunately, no. The Illustrator behavior you are seeing is simply how Illustrator treats Bezier curves and anchor removal. If you're interested, there is a third party vendor who makes a plug ins called VectorScribe and InkScribe. Both these plug ins have "smart" anchor removal tools which allows you to remove anchors and maintain curves. It's a shame ...


6

Tools are only as good as the user using them. I can do vector drawings with notepad and in quite many ways I have better tools available in notepad than in Illustrator*. Possibly your question could have been better if you could have asked of a specific tool. Possibly, you can do whatever you want. Most of the time though font authoring tools dont have ...


4

I have resolved the issue, the culprit was the font's PostScript name (which I naively never changed). I'm guessing it has to do with the caching of fonts based on PostScript names or something. I don't understand it exactly. To change the PostScript name, I've used FontLab Studio 5. In Studio 5, there's a "Font Info" icon to the top left of the "Font" ...


3

If you aren't a type designer then the answer is probably not. It is possible, but if you don't already have and know these tools it can be a big investment of time and money for not much gain. What you gain from these tools isn't the ability to draw shapes better but the tools for working with kerning, hinting etc. Features that you need for creating a ...


3

A font file usually contains only vector information on the shapes of glyphs. Some fonts also come with so-called bitmap strikes for different font sizes though, which are usually hand-corrected for the best rendering. I guess that you have such a font and only changed the vector information while the bitmaps are unchanged. In some programs you now see the ...


3

The term "ligature" in typography usually refers to combining two or more letters when they appear in a defined sequence as shown here: In your question though you seem to ask about creating accented characters, these aren't created with the otf ligature functionality, There are several ways to create them: Find the right Unicode character, let's say Ǎ - ...


3

In FontLab, File menu > Generate Font. This is probably not available in the demo version: "Demo limitations: export and save limitations." The manual, available from the same page, covers "Generating OpenType Fonts" in the full version, starting on page 877.


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Is your typeface built up with strokes (as opposed to shapes)? Then, all you'll have to do is give those strokes a dotted line. In Illustrator, you'd use the stroke palette. Then, Object > Expand the glyph.


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Illustrator will recalculate the curve in only two instances I'm aware of. Adding points Using the simplify command When you delete a point, Illustrator does that an nothing more. If you're left with a straight line, it's because the remaining points had no bezier handles to begin with. Illustrator does not change those remaining points on deletion. I don'...


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Start a text object... point text or area text, it doesn't matter. Set it to the font containing the glyphs. Open the Glyphs Panel (Window > Type > Glyphs).. double-click the glyphs you want in the panel. They will appear in your text string. When done, if you want the text as shapes rather than live text... Select the text object with the selection ...


1

Found the answer: File->Font Info -> Metrics and Dimensions - Change UPM uncheck `Scale all glyphs...` to for example `ORIGINAL_UPM * 14 / 16` - Apply - Change UPM back to ORIGINAL_UP, check `Scale all glyphs...` - Apply


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InDesign's data merge is one option. InDesign Help / Data merge Create a CSV file that lists all the glyphs you want to place in your document. The first line should be the title of the record (which isn't important, it's only the placeholder you'll see in InDesign). Each character/glyph should be on a new line. For example: Create your InDesign document ...


1

Glyphs uses it's own elaborate glyph naming scheme, which is design to be more "human-readable" and is used to auto generate some OpenType features. For example: You can create stylistic sets by using the suffix .ss01 for the first set, .ss02 for the second set etc. You can create figure sets with the following suffixes: .tf for tabular lining, .tosf for ...


1

The answer is simple as can be, yet a newbie might succumb to it: Hold down alt while dragging the line and curve points will appear.


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Yes it's possible with font creation software such as Fontlab or Fontographer, or Glyph, or BirdFont.. or any of them, really. Fonts are merely a collection of symbols, what those symbols are is irrelevant. This is why you see fonts which are pictograms, like Wingdings.


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If you wanted to dork out on your solution, you could make a script in Processing to help automate the process a bit. You can load the font as-is with the PFont function: http://processing.org/reference/PFont.html Generate ellipses in the shape path: http://processing.org/reference/ellipse_.html And then export the forms as PDFs: http://processing.org/...


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What about using a dot pattern as the fill on the shapes? Select the shape, and use the appearance palette to apply a dot pattern?


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Update: For more information on this technique, see forum thread here. Note: Full credit for this answer goes to @yakunins and his answer above. Using FontLab Studio v5.1.3, Mac: 1) Open .vfb: Assuming you already have your icon/logo setup: 2) Enable desired "blank" glyphs: For this font, here's a list of characters I want to be non-spacing and non-...


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I just made such font in this way: I made all the glyphs to have zero width: Ctrl+A → Tools → Action → Metrics → Set width (0) I scaled all the contours in glyphs to zero sized area: Scale (1%) × 3 times I removed all hints (via actions), classes and kerning pairs, you'll figure it out Trick! I removed all contours and points: Ctrl+A → Tools → Action → ...


1

To make the icon sharper, you need to keep in mind the intended dimensions for smaller versions while drawing the source. Try drawing your icon on a grid that is a factor of your smallest size. e.g. 10px icon, 10x10 grid 16px icon, 16x16 grid Makes sense in my head anyway. :)


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With the same Pen tool you can subtract the point. The resulting curve won't be the same but it will be joined and if the adjacent points had handles they will keep them. It's not perfect but it's better than selecting and deleting.


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The general workflow is to open your existing fonts, save your working files as .vfb and export new OpenType fonts. There are quite a few potential issues you need to check for before doing this though. I would suggest you read the manual in detail. (And to be cynical, I'm not convinced that someone who would spend US$649 on an application of this ...


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