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Computer fonts cannot replicate the variations which are common in handwriting. Some certain letter combinations can be defined as ligatures and open type fonts can also have varied letter versions and decoratives, but everyone sees in a second that it's computer font, not written by hand. Creating a rich script font is a major task. It starts on paper by ...


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Free to use for non-commercial purposes. Not really certain what's ambiguous about the term. It's basically the same as "free for personal use". If you profit in any way by the usage of the font, it would be outside the usage permitted. You can't use the font for any client projects or any advertising. If there's any connection, whatsoever, to ...


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Have a look at google fonts. There you can find high quality fonts that you can use anywhere for free. Try with "Inter" or "Archivo" or "Public Sans" but there are others too. Be aware that no free font would be almost same to 'Helvetica' but you can get similar feel that you would get by using Helvetica.


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I did something like this (10?) years ago to make a font based on some engraved lettering that I found on a 1750s map of New England by Lewis Evans. The process was very tedious, but partially because of the software that I was using at the time. If I recall correctly, I think I was using Inkscape to trace the letters by hand, then I imported the letter ...


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There's a video tutorial here which shows how you can do it using online software called Calligrapher. I have no links with the video creator or the website. There's are free and paid options, with a limitation of the number of glyphs in the free version. Might still be enough to get a usable font however. The process involves re-drawing the characters on a ...


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We get these questions quite often. It's never a font available for sale, it's always something designed by the printer manufacturer, perhaps encoded pixel by pixel. A few things in the same space are Helvetica Compressed and Monospaced, maybe some other monospaced fonts or try looking at the Latin character range of fonts designed for Far East languages, ...


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This is some version of DIN, but it's been distressed in the image, intentionally or not. Key giveaways are the G with no vertical spur, the envelope M with a crossing slightly below centre, the R and the overall shape of the C. The '3' is not standard for DIN, it's either been changed in the font the designer used, modified by the designer or borrowed in ...


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This is very much an opinion question. My answer is that it should be OK: both are popular. Although traditionally people advised against pairing two different sans-serifs, in the web age people are used to a sans for body text. The old print design "use a sans for heading, serif for text" thinking is outdated now. My one concern would be that Open ...


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