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14

Picasso was touring an elementary school and viewing the artwork the children had on display. He was amazed at how good it all was. He asked the teacher... "What are you teaching these children such that they are all fantastic artists?" To which, the teacher replied, "I simply know when to take things away from them." At some point, experience ...


9

PE stands for Pan-European and refers to the character set or variety of glyphs you will find in the font. For example, there is an interesting article about the development of Skolar Sans PE here: https://www.rosettatype.com/blog/2016/02/02/Skolar-Sans-Pan-European From Fontshop: https://www.fontshop.com/content/language-support Pan-European 1 (W06) ...


9

There is no standard definition of "Pro" or "Expert" fonts. It was a term that started in the early 2000's when many foundries updated their fonts to include a wider character range and OpenType features. However there was no consensus between foundries on which character set or which features constituted an expert font, so currently the term means generally ...


6

There's more than EM and EN spaces (see below). These are used in advanced typesetting to create optical adjustments between elements or to avoid using repeated spaces. So instead of typing Space multiple times to move something, you can use an EM space to have a clean file with no repeated spaces. In extreme cases you can use an EM space with a blown up ...


6

You've probably read about commercial typefaces (as opposed to free fonts), which generally can include: more weights grouped into families (eg. not just bold and regular) more glyphs (eg. extended language sets, russian, german, french, asian sets) specialized glyphs (eg. math symbols, icons) ligatures (eg. google this) better kerning and optical ...


4

Expert set fonts are additional fonts sold with professional font families. Often they would have genuine small caps as the lower-case, text figures for the numerals, swash capitals in the capital positions (in italic), and maybe ligatures at some codepoint or other (font design studios used to have standards for those; I've checked an old manual for ...


4

Some typographic traditions call for the use of these fractioned spaces. For example, in French. To add to Lucian's answer, using these spaces to replace a double-space for example, will sometimes improve your workflow. For example, I typically find/change double spaces to single space from client material, but we typically need to use a double space ...


3

Select the text tool; Position your text cursor in the place that you want your currency symbol to be; Open Type > Glyphs; In the panel, scroll through your current typeface until you find your desired symbol; Double-click the icon and it will appear in the place of your text cursor. Also works for other symbols you can't type directly. The Glyphs panel is ...


3

If I like 2 solutions for the same thing, I will eventually just pick one and move forward. I will rarely consult with the client in a situation like this to avoid generating new ideas. Whatever I've picked, I will know it was good anyway. I step back and look at the same thing again in a few days and make changes if possible. This is particularly easy in ...


3

This isn't using the standard TeX Computer Modern font family: it seems to be some kind of Garamond. My guess is that this is either EB Garamond 12, or Adobe Garamond, or Adobe Garamond Premier, all of which have a standard default italic 'k' that looks just like this.


2

Logos are usually designed specifically for the title -- so you won't find a font that will be able to write out the name. Sometimes people make full fonts based on a title like "Jurassic Park" Something like GN Kill Gothic U might be a good start and then you would have to change the kerning and maybe add some flourishes in Illustrator or Photoshop.


2

I have to agree with Scott about the fresh eyes. However, I usually ask a friend or family member for an opinion. They don't know anything about design, and I don't always agree with their opinion, but I find this usually pushes me into making a decision. If I agree with them I feel good going in that direction, and when I don't, their opinion sort of makes ...


1

First, you need to use a font which has that symbol. A font may or may not have indian characters, and if it doesn't, no shortcut's going to work. Second, Windows shortcuts won't necessarily have the same effect in Illustrator. If that shortcut is assigned to some other action in Illustrator, or that character in that font file has a code assigned different ...


1

It looks like a mix of the Very Common Invoice Font For Thermal Print and The Most Common Receipt Font of Cash Register But the ReceiptFont website has plenty of other receipt fonts. As user287001 said, you might not find an exact match because the font might be custom to the manufacturer.


1

The original Garamond didn’t start as a font. It was a lettertype, on a very old version of the printing press, back in the 1500’s (yes, Garamond is that old). Old lettertypes such as Garamond were not just images on a screen, they first had to be carved out of steel. Now, beyond the difficulty in manipulating metal back in the 1500s, each of these sets of ...


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