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1

If you do not have TI-85 emulator draw it as pixel art as suggested already by others or create it in LaTeX as you have already done. When you have a bitmap image like the black one vectorize it. Start in GIMP or Photoshop by increasing the pixel dimensions to Nx100%, at least to 400% with nearest neighbour resampling for no blur. Paste the result to ...


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You might proceed with both serif and sans-serif fonts, one for each language. There are hybrid fonts, such as Absara, Officina, Brioni, Rotis, Schnebel, Simplon, Alianza, Archivio, etc., which might suffice.


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The standard answer when both texts use the Latin alphabet is to have one text in italics, so it has a different texture and stands out.


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Found a way to do this that is super quick and easy doesn't require plugins or advanced plugin knowledge actually generates a cleaner SVG export Here's what you do: Open your Sketch file and highlight everything you want to export cmd + c (copy) Open Adobe Illustrator, new file cmd + v (paste) Select All text, Type > Create Outlines Switch back to ...


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You have to understand the entire thing, like "Repeat Any Shape Along a Path" So, you need to convert the font into a Path first, Than It's straightforward to apply any brushes (pattern, scatter) to any path. You can also use the brush tool to draw the design! See the example below Full Work


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For block text readability I personally use this simple rule: Vertical space between the lines (put in lowercase) should be ca. 180% of the height of the lowercase letters. Other criteria (than readability) may exist, like e.g. economy of paper/space, so those can come in play for certain applications. To illustrate the rule, I copy paste the letter "...


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Font creation/editing software is specifically designed to take glyphs, in vector form and generate working font files. Allowing the creator to set options such as default letter spacing, tracking, etc. If your SVG glyphs are vector, all you need do is use actual font creation software, not "icon collection" software. CreativeBloq has an article ...


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Arial and ITC Franklin Gothic are the likeliest options.


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There are no rules. There is no "best used for X" regarding any typeface. This is all what a designer's aesthetic eye has to determine for each piece designed and the goal of that particular piece. i.e for a lot of copy in print, a serif may work best... but if the goal is to promote a more "informational" atmosphere a serif typeface will ...


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Is all up to you what kind of font you use. Beside the display fonts (that are designed to be used on headings) you can chose whatever font you need to create the desired mood for you page (even Comic Sans). For web design you should also take into consideration the performance of the page before you chose the mood of the page. If you load too many fonts (...


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