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78

This is a bit of an opinion-based question, but I still think there's value in it. Also somewhat belongs on Freelance.SE, but may fit here as well. To be honest, the most difficult part of freelancing is sticking to your guns during negotiations. This is compounded if you financially need the work. The best option is often to simply stick to your price "...


58

Make a phone call. Do not use an e-mail for this interview. You can't even know if he is answering this questions or he is just mentioning some previous ideas he has. If it is unpaid... do not do it. You are not only damaging yourself but the whole industry. The "Oh, I'm new" is not a reason at all. Either you have practiced a lot and have become good at ...


48

Pretty much all Gen-Y or young "startup" use that "let's see if we're a good fit" catch phrase. And promise "more work coming" blablabla. Seriously. In other words, it means "we have no money and we're still struggling paying off those 200 nice cups and T-Shirts we ordered with our Word logo on them, and fancy photoshoots of our team of 3, etc.". You ...


48

There's many good answers for this. One thing I can suggest is to simply present the logo to the real business by explaining it the same way you did here! The fact that your logo got a lot of attention already is something that might be appealing to that business. This way, you won't feel like you're judging their logo; you're simply presenting them some ...


42

My business is not a backup service for any client. All clients should be backing up the files they've received on their own. It's not my responsibility to be an indefinite backup service for any client, ever. Clients are not paying a regular fee to maintain equipment, upgrade hard drives, purchase additional hard drives as needed, maintaining software, ...


40

If they want to try you out (fair enough), and their budget is $300, offer something else you are willing to do for that price (a business card proposal? A presentation template? a website banner?) that can show off your skills, test your relationship with the client, and give them something of value. It doesn't have to be a logo or nothing. If they're not ...


35

Asking for a "mood board" is waaaaaaaaaaaaaay too much to ask any client. That's perhaps a designer's tool and a client should never be asked to do that work. That's what they are paying you for (or not paying as the case may be). Rafael is correct when he posted make a phone call. Often in emails people skim and don't actually read. So things get missed, ...


34

Another common issue is, that by posting their content on Behance in your name, their brand is on a platform they can't control. It may be difficult (even borderline Quixotic) in our age, but many organisations try hard to keep complete control of all uses of their brand. Worries can include: They might simply have unspecified concerns about a comms ...


30

If you don't like any, you'd have to pay more This is exactly what you should say. Now, prior to creating the logos, you should have a design briefing meeting with the client, so that the client can give you some direction and you're not just striking out blindly with your three designs. I like to give homework by asking "What are three (sites, logos, ...


30

Okay, it depends on this: If they saw proofs or any other mock up and signed off on the design before it went to code, then I think you are in a good position. They should pay for it, propose that they pay you some money and walk away. If they never saw proofs, just walk away and keep the deposit (they are happy with the logo and stationary, they should pay ...


30

Ethically and morally..... using any "contest" is merely taking advantage of designers. Contest do nothing but take advantage of designers and give all the benefit to the person running the contest. It essentially amounts to "slave labor" of a sort. All designers should adamantly avoid "contest" settings. However, if a designer freely agrees to being taken ...


29

Looking at your question I can see some points that cause me immediate concern: "...first payment after the first milestone (30%)." For me at least that's an immediate problem. I too have staged payments, but the the first stage is always a deposit. If you get paid before you lift a finger you benefit from several advantages! ...problems appeared ...


27

I will start by saying I have negative social skills with a seasoning of Aspie on them. So, taking that into account, here I go. Based on my Spock-like field work, I have learnt that my non-creative clients (I have creative clients as well) tend to be problem solving oriented. They tend to focus on the problems they have and are very interested on how you ...


26

Don't. Unless specified in the original contracts of that 6-year body of work, you are not obliged to keep the original working files of past projects. That you do so is only for personal archiving. Shenanigans like this are the exact reason for that, and I advise you to include a statement to that effect in your terms and conditions from now on. Try and ...


25

If you lower your prices, don't forget to lower your service. As @Scott says, rates are set for a reason. If a client asks us for a cheaper deal, we say "yes" and then we re-propose the project with some features or aspects removed. We then make the client aware that we've achieved a cheaper price by reducing features or proposing a slightly different/...


25

Depends on your contract. In general, absolutely, yes. You did the work, you provided it to the client, now their job is to pay you. I would not offer a discount (seriously, 50 variations?) but would keep it in mind for negotiation if needed. Given that you did so many variations, I would probably offer a 20% discount at most, but only if they were ...


24

The client is taking advantage of you. Plain and simple. If "payment is not an issue" as the client states, then the client would have no problem paying you what you are owed to the current point. Whatever that may be. If you had an agreement of 30% at this particular stage... then demand that 30% before doing more. In my experience, any client that states ...


24

I sympathise. I can only tell you what I do, and it's a useful phased approach that has worked for me over the many years I have employed the concept! Step 1 - Explain that you are designing for the end user - Remind them that the design is this way not because you want it this way, and it shouldn't change because the client (or his wife/nephew/postman) ...


22

I made a promise to myself to never use my powers for evil. I've created many pieces which sell, what I would see as, ethically borderline in terms of the product itself. Meaning... snake oil. A product I know is being sold and marketed as the "be-all, end-all" which could not possibly be true. My thoughts on these types of project has been, well, if ...


20

For me, it's always the why. I've run into many situations where a client is initially uneasy about my work. Not because they outright dislike it, but because they don't think it fits with "what they've seen." When clients are accustomed to seeing the same thing over and over from themselves as well as any competitors, it can be a challenge to get them to ...


19

Quote a price, then itemize on any estimate/invoice. If a client sends a broad statement like you've posted.... First ask questions even if you know the answers to them: Will you be providing the copy to use or is that something you want me to come up with? Do you have high resolution images you'd like to provide? Then respond with an itemized list of ...


18

it was meant to see how we work together "I understand what you're trying to accomplish, but I hope you understand that part of making sure we work well together is respecting and valuing each other on an even playing field. I do excellent work, and if I give you a discount without a contract that includes other work that justifies the discount, then, as a ...


18

Your client doesn't know what they want, and they don't know what any of the things you ask mean. You know the industry that the client works in, you know the name. Throw together a few different ideas in very rough draft. Send them to the client making very clear that these are rough sketches to get a concept not a final piece and ask them to rate each ...


17

It's not normal, but not uncommon. There can be many reasons for it. Often it is simply a strong-armed legal department that insists on NDA-type relations with all vendors. I typically leave a line in my contracts that states I reserve the right to showcase the work in my portfolio. If this raises a red flag for the client, then it's a topic we can ...


17

I disagree with most of the answers here. Don't sell the logo. It just sets you up for a lot of speculative work in the worst of ways. If they do accept it, any customers they refer will expect you to first do some work, or even a lot, before they decide to hire you. However, since the logo is already made, you've got a rather bad bargaining position. ...


17

I've been both the one with the backups and the one that needed a backup. In general, unless it is hard for you to keep their files (for example terabytes of video or contracts prohibit it), you should keep it. There are times when a file is accidentally deleted or corrupted, the change is synced to dropbox etc, and you don't notice for 6 months that the ...


17

One thing I've learned over the years is that (as much as we are inclined to think so) most clients are not really idiots. They simply don't know what we know about graphic design. In my experience, when a customer asks for something obviously foolish, especially when they get overly specific, they are just trying to solve a problem without the proper tools ...


16

Yes. If you work on anything for a client it's billable. It doesn't matter if it's an entirely new item or a reformatting of an old/existing item. They all take your time and it's your time you charge for. i.e. The poster may take you 8 hours to design... the social media content may take you an additional 2 hours to reformat the poster art to fit online ...


15

On the point of contests in general, on top of what Farray's said I'll just add, do the maths: $490 prize for one person out of 1,109 entrants? Assuming all designs took just two hours on average and people keep at it as long as it takes until they finally win something, that'd give the designers participating in this system an average wage of 22 cents an ...


15

I think most clients will assume price is negotiable and try to lower it ;) Something you can do is offer more than one option per project. This doesn't work in every case, but I've done it a few times and results were good. You make two or three proposals based on features, starting with the most basic one and going up to a super-complete-pack. You list ...


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