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4

The answer is simply that all your pixels are in fact the same color (white), they just have different transparency. A GIF only has 1-bit transparency. A pixel is either 100% opaque or 100% transparent. So it's not possible to save a GIF preserving these semi-transparent pixels. The solution would be to save a PNG-24 instead as it supports 8-bit transparency....


3

Unfortunately the problem here is not with Gimp, it's with GIF. GIF does not support partial transparency. If you must use a GIF file then your only options are no drop shadows, or having a solid background behind the animation so partial transparency is not needed. You could possibly use small dots instead of a gradient to get a less than perfect ...


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So for anyone following behind me, I found the solution that worked for me. The original format of the frames prior to trying to export as a GIF out of Gimp were PNGs that were placed in a tmp folder by Blender with the following setting as the output. I then used the Optimize (for GIf) filter that Gimp offers and exported as a Gif with the following ...


2

Your frames are in "combine" mode, so the most likely explanation is that your GIF is "optimized": a frame only contains the pixels that are different from those in the previous frame, and everything else in the frame is transparent. You can restore complete frames (if fact you must, if you intend to edit anything) using Filters ➤ ...


2

GIFs do not allow for smooth 8-bit transparency. It is simply a limitation of the format itself. There's nothing you can do to alter or overcome that limitation. GIF transparency is 1-bit - meaning it's either on or off, nothing in between. The best you can do in a GIF is to dither the transparency which will create a sort of stipple or dot pattern within ...


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You could use the slice tool to do it, then do File > Export > Save for Web (legacy), select all the slices and set them to GIF. This works with static or animated GIFs. An example Cut up gifs exported to a folder


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Not sure why it happens or how the color works in GIF, but here are two workarounds in case you don't know: Try changing the mode to Perceptual (or try others) from Selective (under GIF dropdown) If that doesn't work, manually edit (or add a new color buy removing that bluish white) the color in the color palette listed. You can first use eyedropper tool to ...


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The BEST way Plug each image into a page together with the correct html and css coding. They won't be one single image, but this is the simplest and most flexible way to do it. The Hard way If you want to combine each animated GIF into one, tall single image, you've got your work cut out for you. How I would approach it: I don't know how many frames there ...


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