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3

The delay in frames. The original has a 0.04 delay for each frame. Yours has a 0 delay. Setting the delay back to 0.04 corrects the issue. Original: Yours: Yours with delay reset:


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No. You can not "add" a gif to a still image. You can create a gif where only a portion of the image is animated. However the format must be gif if there is animation within the image. Gifs do not have to animate everything in every frame. These are gif images where only a small portion of the image is actually animated. These are often called ...


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Since v2.19, ScreenToGif lets you add dropshadows to your recordings/animations. You can manually add the shadows while editing: Or you can set a task to add the shadow after recording: These are the exported animations (Gif and Apng):


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I'd do the following if I was making a sizable batch of these gifs: Record the screen of me typing using any of the tools in Scott's link in his comment above Import the clips into Adobe After Effects Create a new composition for each clip and trim as needed Then I'd use the GifGun After Effects plugin to export them as GIFs. (There's even an option to ...


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If you want an image file to be animated, it will have to be in a .GIF format. However, there are tricks you can do to make it seem like a part of the image is moving while the other parts remain still. So let's say you have 10 frames of the animation. The part you want still - let's say it's the right side of the image. All 10 frames of the right side ...


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This has nothing to do with Geocities as such. When people began making websites in the early days of the web, it was a very different environment. There was no high speed broadband, only very slow dial-up modem connections. Because of that, images file sizes on web pages had to be kept as small as possible so that they would load in a reasonable amount of ...


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First and foremost, the speed a GIF plays at depends on your browser and hardware capabilities. Nothing to do with Photoshop really. If you set the frame speed faster than your browser can display it, then you simply won't notice that it's actually playing slower. You may have simply noticed this now because you have a new computer that has newer/better/...


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A GIF image is color-indexed, each color is a one-byte index in a 256-colors (max) "color map". When you edit such a file in Gimp, Gimp keeps it as color-indexed, and will coerce any color you use into the closest one in the color map (Gimp will not alter the color map on its own). This also applies to images you import in the project (File>Open as ...


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The problem is caused because all GIFs use Indexed colour. It has nothing to do with GIMP really. The problem is with the image format itself, and the way that colours are stored in it. Anyway it's easy enough to fix. Try this: Open the first GIF image Do Image > Mode > RGB - this will solve the colour problems when importing the GIF in the next step Click ...


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The problem is that each of the original elements had its own palette. On the combined GIF, the second clip is using the palette of the first one. One option is to convert the files to 24 bits and reconvert it down to an indexed palette, taking now into account all the colors of the sequence. You will have fewer colors because some of the colors will not ...


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Reposting (with permission) mathr's answer from Mastodon Save the code below to script.sh #!/bin/bash # 1. get input frame count (note two spaces after the "\") count=$(gifsicle --info < input.gif | grep "<stdin>" | cut -d\ -f 3) # 2. define how many times to repeat frames repeats=5 # 3. construct new frame list frames=$(for i in $(seq 0 $((...


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Using ImageMagick's identify -verbose command and comparing the original version against a version un-optimized in Gimp (Filter>Animation>Unoptimize) The original version doesn't show an alpha channel in the first frame, while the Gimp one does. The alpha channel is of course necessary to support transparency. The original version as a comment that ...


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On the Windows side, I have used (and still use) Screen2Gif which is freeware and quite effective. I have other more polished tools available for more intensive captures, but for a quickie grab 'n go to gif, it works. https://www.screentogif.com/ Hope that helps


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This will be just a clumsy answer because I do not use FFmpeg. But the problem I am seeing is not that you have a board palette, but that the program is adjusting the colors from a palette to a color that is not included in that palette. Some options to explore: Take a color picker and measure one of the two colors the program used on your gif and modify ...


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There's likely a faster way to do this somehow (and if I had to do this for more than a handful of frames I would have probably used ffmpeg) but the fastest way I was able to do this in GIMP was by first, preparing the overlay as a layer, selecting and copying that layer, selecting the bottom layer in the layers tab, pressing Ctrl-V to paste the overlay, ...


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