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7

Choose black as the foreground colour Select the Brush Tool. In the tool options underneath the toolbox, set the Hardness to 100%, and size to something like 10. Use the Fuzzy select tool (Magic Wand) or the Select by Colour tool, to select the blue area Do Edit > Stroke selection, choose the "Stroke with a paint tool" option. Click Stroke. Do Select > ...


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In GIMP you could use the Select by Colour tool to select most of the grey coloured pixels, choose white as the foreground colour, then do Edit > Fill with FG color. Unfortunately, this will also erase all the vertical grey lines on the blue dots too, plus you'll probably still need to do some manual retouching. If there had been some colour separation ...


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On recent Ubuntu (since 18.04 at least, may be earlier) they made the Python support in Gimp optional. You can tell if your Gimp has Python support by looking at the bottom of the Filters menu that should have a Python-fu submenu alongside the Script-fu one. If it's not there you are missing Python. You can install the Gimp python support using sudo apt ...


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Try holding in ctrl-key and scrolling up or down on the mouse-wheel. while doing this you can move your mouse-pointer in the desired area of the canvas you want to zoom in on, another way to more finely do this is hold ctrl-key in and hold in the scroll-wheel and move your mouse up or down on the canvas. this is probably what you are trying to do.


2

Further to my comments, there's no Undo tool in GIMP. However there is a possible work around using the Clone tool to paint back a history state selectively. It's similar to the History Brush which is available in Photoshop. Obviously I'm not sure how useful this will be for your particular case. If you have an undo step available in the history that you ...


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The example photo is noisy and unsharp, there's no contrast at all in many places of the edge. Unsharpness and shadow over the edge needs something which knows what is the hand and what is not. As already said in a comment, in automatic software that means artificial intelligence and world awareness. I have not seen such software for photo editors, but that ...


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The image you are trying to use is not very good for automating this. The shadow is problematic. Try instead to take a picture of the subject against a plain background, but far enough away from the background itself so as not to cast a shadow. Assuming you have a suitable image, there is a semi-automatic way using the Foreground Select tool in GIMP. The ...


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do I have to add a layer mask, whenever I want a gradient effect to take shape of my selection and stay on that layer? No. As klewis has said, what you do need to do is to change tools before leaving the object you are editing. This can be a useful feature, though it is also an annoyance if you are editing many gradients on different objects. Being able to ...


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From this point, if I select none, the gradient no longer sits in my rectangle selection, but is applied to the entire image. In the Gimp 2.10 UI, the Blend tool and many others remain active because you can edit your settings while applying the tool (in the Blend tool, you can move the endpoints, and even adjust the gradient). So you changed the selection ...


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In a raster image there is no concept of an object, as there is in vector graphics. Operations are not done by recording a definition of actions on a particular entity. Actually, if there is an object at all it is either the image in total, or an individual pixel. A pixel in the image is changed in some way, and editors can record this in history, usually ...


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Image>Properties has a "Comments" tab where you can input free text which is saved with the XCF. Keep in mind that the comment can end up in exported images (and if too big it makes the JPEG plug-in fail...).


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No easy solution. I would do it that way (assuming that all layers already have an alpha channel) with some existing scripts: Create the selection Duplicate the image (Image>Duplicate) In the duplicate, Select>Invert and delete the selection on all layers using the clear-layers script. (if needed) delete the selection in the source image with the same ...


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Another method: Set foreground/backgroud to the two colors Select>All Start the Blend tool, with gradient: FG to BG (RGB) shape: Shaped (Spherical) Click and drag on the image, this will create a shaped gradient, as well as adding a control line. Click on the middle of the line to add a control point, and slide it to adjust the color transition. You ...


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Have 2 empty layers, both full sized and with alpha channel or at least the top layer must have alpha channel Fill the bottom layer with the background color. Make a rectangular selection, smaller than the layer and fill it with the foreground color in the top layer: Blur the top layer: Keep the layers separate as long as you are not sure if some ...


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You can enter your own zoom ratio in the zoom indicator: This is also doable via View>Zoom>Other... Otherwise, with a given window size, you can use View>Zoom>Fill window (your image is zoomed until its edges reach the edges of the window) View>Zoom>Zoom to selection (your image is zoomed until the edges of the selection reach the edges ...


1

I wouldn't use the method employed in that tutorial. Instead duplicate the background layer, select the top layer, and do a Hue-Saturation adjustment, moving the sliders until the liquid turns the colour you want. This will of course change the colour of the whole image. But then you can add a black filled layer mask, select the Layer mask by clicking on ...


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On linux you can losslessly optimize you png images with optipng which does not all the effect like tinyPNG does, but already some percent. optimize all your images in the current folder with: sudo apt install optipng find . -name '*.png' -exec optipng -o7 {} \;


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Simple answer: GIMP (up to v2.8) can not do that for you. But there are workarounds. At first, one side note: there are no "Gimp fonts" — all fonts come from your system. So we all can use the system font viewer. Or, as an alternative, install an external viewer for the appropriate operating system. Here are several useful links: SO question about ...


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To all those, like me, who did not find a solution by changing the mode to RGB.... The problem could be that the image has an embedded color profile that is somehow messing with how GIMP acts on the image. The solution is as follows: Image > Color Management > Discard Color Profile This will force GIMP to use its own built-in sRGB color profile. ...


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