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8

Wow. I'd love to know exactly where that was*. I used to live (35 years ago) in Oulton, right next door to Woodlesford. I don't recall ever seeing that on my travels, presumably long demolished. Gimp has a plugin called Resynthesizer, which can be used as a 'heal' tool. It's included in the build if you use the version of Gimp from https://www.partha.com ...


8

The file you linked to isn't a JPG. It's a PNG* with the wrong file extension. Maybe somebody changed it deliberately for some unknown reason, or they just saved it with the wrong file extension. JPG is RGB only. PNG supports RGBa (with alpha transparency). So, if you want to save it with transparency from GIMP or Krita, you need to export as PNG. *Note: ...


7

Choose black as the foreground colour Select the Brush Tool. In the tool options underneath the toolbox, set the Hardness to 100%, and size to something like 10. Use the Fuzzy select tool (Magic Wand) or the Select by Colour tool, to select the blue area Do Edit > Stroke selection, choose the "Stroke with a paint tool" option. Click Stroke. Do Select > ...


5

See Edit>Preferences>Interface>Display>Transparency>Check style You can configure it to "White only"


5

On recent Ubuntu (since 18.04 at least, may be earlier) they made the Python support in Gimp optional. You can tell if your Gimp has Python support by looking at the bottom of the Filters menu that should have a Python-fu submenu alongside the Script-fu one. If it's not there you are missing Python. You can install the Gimp python support using sudo apt ...


5

NoHalo and LoHalo are the new GEGL samplers, developed by Nicolas Robidoux to reduce the blur in the resampled images. NoHalo level 1 consists of one diagonal straightening subdivision followed by bilinear interpolation, as described in this paper: Like many edge-enhancing methods, Nohalo has two main stages: first, nonlinear interpolation is used to create ...


4

You can use the Warp Transform tool in GIMP It's located here on the toolbar shown below, or you can press W to select it. Then just paint with it to move and warp the pixels. You can change the size of the tool using the [ and ] keys. When you have finished hit Return / Enter to commit the warp. It works best if you don't go too crazy with the tool, ...


4

So I know next to nothing about Gimp, but you could do this in Imagemagick, which as long as you're able to install, should be as easy as copy&pasting the code into the command line and pressing enter. cd "path to your input folder" mkdir "../output" mogrify \ -path "../output" \ -rotate '180' \ +distort Polar 0 \ -...


4

You can use Colors > Components > Mono Mixer to convert other than yellow to black and yellow to white: You must decide how much orange can be accepted. In the next mix less orange has passed through: If it must be yellow you can colorize the image:


4

Possible answer for Gimp: ofn-enclosing-circle (available here) determines the smallest circle that encloses the shape and does things with it. Note that on your image it doesn't produce the circle that you expect: .. but the circle is a tighter fit (294 px vs 300px). If you look at the Wikipedia article the smallest circle is either defined by a diameter (...


3

Do Edit > Preferences > Tool Options. Then under "Paint options shared between tools", uncheck the Brush option.


3

The right option is in Edit -> Preferences -> Input Devices settings page called Share tool and tool options between input devices


3

In GIMP 2.10, this is now possible. Thanks to @Michael Schumacher for the bug link: https://bugzilla.gnome.org/show_bug.cgi?id=730216 Steps: Create a Layer Group Add layers into layer group Select the Layer Group Click and Hold the Shift Key, while Mouse Dragging Layer Group to new location.


3

Try holding in ctrl-key and scrolling up or down on the mouse-wheel. while doing this you can move your mouse-pointer in the desired area of the canvas you want to zoom in on, another way to more finely do this is hold ctrl-key in and hold in the scroll-wheel and move your mouse up or down on the canvas. this is probably what you are trying to do.


3

In GIMP you could use the Select by Colour tool to select most of the grey coloured pixels, choose white as the foreground colour, then do Edit > Fill with FG color. Unfortunately, this will also erase all the vertical grey lines on the blue dots too, plus you'll probably still need to do some manual retouching. If there had been some colour separation ...


3

I don't use gimp but from a quick google and youtube search I think the tool you are looking for is the Warp transform tool. this short video demonstrate how to use this tool (i think it's in Dutch but you can still get the gist)


3

This task is simply done using ImageMagick montage function. Assuming that you have 6 tiles (map_tile01.png, map_tile02.png, ..., map_tile06.png) and an empty image of the same size of the tiles (empty_tile.png): You can use the following command: montage.exe empty_tile.png map_tile01.png empty_tile.png map_tile02.png map_tile03.png map_tile04.png ...


3

If you can scan the photo, and have a decent scanner, you scan the photo in to opposite directions, load the two pictures in Gimp, flip one, and blend them using "Lighten only". But you need a good scanner, those of all-in-one printers are usually not accurate enough and slightly distort the image. With a single picture, my suggestion: Filters>Enhance&...


3

This what the selection tools are for. For instance you use the lasso tool to draw a polygon around the face, add some feathering (Select>Feather or use the tools' feathering option), and then do the color changes (hat will only apply to the selection area).


3

You have tool groups enabled*. It's the default setting and a new feature in GIMP 2.10.18 The Ellipse Select tool is in the same group as the Rectangle Select tool. To find it, just click and hold down the Rectangle Select tool to see the Ellipse tool hidden under it, and select it. You can tell which tools are groups by the tiny little arrow at the bottom ...


3

Forget pure color based approach - in real photos there's so much noise that you do not get the effect limited to the wanted blue parts. Bite the bullet. Make a layer duplicate and remove there all except the parts you want to make white. Draw a path or use other background removal methods. The challenge isn't impossible, but you may need to practice a while ...


3

In the newest GIMP the default Crop Tool behaviour has changed to allow non-destructive cropping. Basically it crops the canvas, not the layers, and so doesn't delete any pixels. If you export the image however, the crop should be applied to the exported file. I just tested a non-destructive crop and exported the result as PNG and it works as expected. I ...


2

Since v2.19, ScreenToGif lets you add dropshadows to your recordings/animations. You can manually add the shadows while editing: Or you can set a task to add the shadow after recording: These are the exported animations (Gif and Apng):


2

The only solution I can think of is making multiple layers and using stroke without fill on each of them. Then you can adjust it to your liking. Images below: ^ The number of scans is up to you—pick the one that looks best. ^ Disable the fill and set the stroke to solid black. The thickness is also your choice. I hope that helps! I reckon you're ...


2

The "Colors" --> "Colorify..." plugin does not seem to exist anymore (in 2.10.20 at least). The "Colors" --> "Colorize" does not work well indeed to replace a black color, the replaced color is much darker and it's hard to get a perfect match with the desired color by playing with the lightness setting for ...


2

Layer>Crop to content removes the largest possible area around the outside edge which all has the same color. Image>Crop to content does the same for the image.


2

On linux you can losslessly optimize you png images with optipng which does not all the effect like tinyPNG does, but already some percent. optimize all your images in the current folder with: sudo apt install optipng find . -name '*.png' -exec optipng -o7 {} \;


2

I had a look at your XCF file. PNG and JPEG don't support additional channels. They are RGBa (4 channels) for PNG, and RGB (3 channels) for JPEG. Any additional channels you add will be completely ignored on export to these formats. To add a texture to an existing image, don't add it on a channel. Instead add it on a new layer, and then change the blending ...


2

Simple answer: GIMP (up to v2.8) can not do that for you. But there are workarounds. At first, one side note: there are no "Gimp fonts" — all fonts come from your system. So we all can use the system font viewer. Or, as an alternative, install an external viewer for the appropriate operating system. Here are several useful links: SO question about ...


2

Although it's possible to use GIMP to create work like this manually by copying and pasting, it's not the best kind of software to use for this. Use Inskcape instead. It's a vector image editor, and it's free and open source like GIMP. It has a feature called "clones" which could solve your problem. This is very similar to what is sometimes called "symbols" ...


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