New answers tagged

3

For Gimp there is the ofn-trapeze-transform script/plugin. After installation check in Filters > Distorts The plugin is fairly slow since it processes the image line of pixels after lines of pixels. Note that what you want distorts straight lines: In fact this plugin has been written to demonstrate all the bad side effects of such a transform :)


2

Separate the verticals. What you are after is not perspective. In actual perspective what is closer to the viewer gets elongated, larger, as it moves away. What you've shown as "desired" is actually the opposite of this. Using Illustrator.. Separate the internal verticals so they are not part of the grid Warp the horizontals Use Pathfinder > ...


6

I assume you want it works with any image, not only with rectangular boxes. The distortion you want is not perspective, you want Y scaling which depends linearly on X. Some programs allow it without having any plugins nor writing a script. The one I know is Affinity Photo. There you can use distortion with equations - you write a formula for coordinates from ...


0

You can do that with 'warp' transformation Very fiddly to do so but I am pretty sure that there is no other way.... You will have to set the grid to default so you have less points to move about (pretty new feature to change grid may not be there if version is not up-to-date)


0

There are a couple of possible problems. It's hard to tell precisely what's wrong without access to the XCF file or your setup of GIMP. But anyway, here are some things to check. The warp tool only works on one layer at a time. If you want to warp all layers simultaneously, you'd need to merge all the layers first. If a layer has the pixel lock engaged, ...


0

Possibly a bug, see this. Since the bug is reported for 2.10.24, downgrading to 2.10.22 or 2.10.20 could be a workaround. Otherwise, is there anything interfering with your clipboard such as a clipboard manager? I had problem with image due to Klipper (the clipboard manager in KDE) and disabling it for images solved my problem.


0

I found a method that might work for you. In the command line, I run this script in the folder where my files are. while true; do sleep 3 for file in *.png; do currentwidth=`identify -format '%w' "$file"` newwidth=`echo "$file" | egrep -o "\d*\.png$" | egrep -o "\d*"` if [[ -n $newwidth &&...


0

You can wrap the text around the entire circle by two ways: 1st : By changing the text size to greater value so it wraps completely but the uper portion text would look upside down. 2nd and clean option : By manually creating a circle and pasting the text that goes in the bottom line (by Type > Type on a Path > Flip) and creating another circle which ...


0

I found a solution. Set the text box that is being wrapped to the path to be dynamic, in the tool options. For some reason this setting is respected even when the text is being placed on a path, so it was wrapping to the length of the box.


3

One change in GIMP 2.10 is that you can now edit gradients directly with the Gradient Tool, live on-screen. This is a vast improvement over the old Gradient Editor and could save you a lot of trouble. Also you probably don't need to use several gradients and masks. One gradient would do the job just fine. The example below is a blue background, white text ...


0

The tutorial you linked to is over 5 years old. GIMP had a major update from version 2.8 to 2.10 in 2018, with many changes, and there have been many updates since. Currently at version 2.10.24 as of today's date. In one of those updates (can't remember which specifically) the name of the "Value" layer mode was changed to "HSV Value". It'...


1

In Photoshop (I think this is what you are referring to) Use Select > Color range to make a selection by colour Do Layer > New > Layer via copy or Ctrl+J In GIMP Use the Select by Colour tool to make a selection by colour Do Edit > Copy or Ctrl+C Do Edit > Paste as > New Layer in Place There's no default shortcut in GIMP for the last ...


1

There is no way to do this perfectly without redrawing it in illustrator, which is a bit of work and not very easy for beginners. Usually this kind of thing happens when a font is compressed in a jpg or something similar. But in this case the font is "Bombshell Pro by Emily Lime" and the edgyness is part of that font. Maybe use whatthefont to find ...


1

Without writing any code, if you have not got too many layers (or have enough RAM): Create a single layer holding all your pages. Apply your operations. Split the resulting big layer into pages again. Operations 1 and 3 can be done using the ofn-layer-tiles script. Otherwise you would need a custom script. Not that hard if you have some programmming ...


1

Thanks to the comment above and the linked answer by @xenoid, I found the font and installing it solved the issue. The Python Console is accessible under Filters/Python-Fu, where the object representing the open image can be found with img = gimp.image_list()[0] (0 of course being the index of the open image). From there, one can select the text layer (layer ...


1

If you have the font, use it in Inkscape. Apply Path > Object to Path to make the written text to vector drawing. If you simply remove the excessive path nodes with the node tool you get smoother curves. By default Inkscape tries to keep the curves as nearly original as possible with less nodes. Prepare to remove tens of nodes per a letter. Path > ...


0

Using the ofn-path-edit script, several ways: #1: Make a selection (Freehand, rectangle...) around the characters you want to delete (or keep) and use the Delete Stroke/Extract strokes function. #2: Use the Break text path apart function, that will create a new path per character (or diacritic mark). Keep the one you need.


2

Some improvement can be obtained like this: Scale down the image to some realistic size (text 200px high) Filter > Blur > Gaussian blur (Size X/Size Y=3-4). Make sure that the top of the o doesn't become too transparent or you'll have a cut there. Layer > Transparency > Alpha to selection Select > To Path At that point you have a path which ...


0

I had the same problem till today. I disabled Windows Ink, and it worked perfectly. In the pen tablet menu, it's at the bottom left, next to Export Configuration. Hope this solves your problem!


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If the text is all one combined path, you can delete nodes using the Paths Tool by holding down Ctrl+Shift+click to delete them. Continue deleting until the letter is completely gone. You can also delete line segments using the same method by doing this on a line rather than a node, but the nodes will be left behind. If the paths for each letter are separate,...


2

Fill a layer above your artwork with any colour you want. Set the layer mode to Dissolve. Move the opacity slider from 0 towards 100 for more noise. Example


1

There are some problems That size image would be far too big. Massive in fact. Don't create such large images for on-screen use. It's absolutely unnecessary. Find the size (in pixels) of the screen/device the wallpaper is going to be used on. That should be the size you need. Raster images always look best at the native size and resolution of the device ...


3

Yes. It is alpha. On File formats, the alpha channel or mask is automatically generated if the format allows it. It is also used for example as a color notation on CSS for web pages.


1

If you are on OSX Big Sur, this is a known problem. You can check your selection with the QuickMask or the Selection editor. Not that when you do Select ➤ To path and the Edit ➤ Stroke path only one half of the path is drawn since the other half/side lies outside the selection. If the path is thin (1px) there is not much left.


0

You have to create an animation where the static image is part of every frame, which, in Gimp parlance, means to replicate/merge your static image over every layer. If you have more than a few frames there are scripts to help you do this, such as ofn-interleave-layers (use single layer over stack (title)). Make sure that you are not working on an optimized ...


1

Photoshop could do the conversion easily - EPS would be loaded with transparency. Here's a simple EPS opened in Photoshop (no edits done): I guess you are not going to use Photoshop nor other commercial stuff which could do the job. There's an earlier answer which suggests converting the background to transparent with color to alpha in GIMP. It's a good ...


0

Little known option: View ➤ Snap to active path. You create a path with a bunch of horizontal lines. Manually, using the grid to help you Automatically, using ofn-path-inbetweener: you create paths for top and bottom lines, and use the script to create N lines in between. You then use the Shear tool (with Transform: Path mode in the tool options) to shear ...


0

It's best to use layer masks in GIMP for this kind of work. Then you can simply edit the mask to reveal or hide parts if you made a mistake. The beauty of using layer masks is that they are non-destructive, and so you edit the mask rather than the image itself. Basically, make a selection of the object using any tools you want. If you are selecting the ...


0

Duplicate the layer. Open Color > Curves > Alpha. Turn it to maximum (= to horizontal to the top edge) Copy the accidentally destroyed area which should now be restored with lasso to a new (=3rd) layer and merge it to the partially succeeded background removal job layer. Actually no new layers are a must. A less cautious person would select the ...


0

Not exactly what you ask but I have a quick solution for this specific idea. You can draw your lines in 1:1 ratio, meaning they will be 45 degree lines. After you draw your thing you can just stretch it to 2:1 ratio or 200% on the X axis and you should get this result. I tried it in Photoshop and it did work with one little obstacle. PS added antialiasing to ...


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