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It's pretty simple, select color > colorize. Then, in the dialog, next to "Color", you have a colored rectangle. Just click it.<< Except in my Colorize dialog, there's no next to 'Color' and no colored rectangle. All I see to change the color is a slider labeled Hue which doesn't allow a precise color that was, say picked, from somewhere.


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These answers are wrong. You can totally colorize a picture with a reference hexadecimal color code. It's pretty simple, select color > colorize. Then, in the dialog, next to "Color", you have a colored rectangle. Just click it. Then you can enter your hexadecimal code, and you're good to go.


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There's likely a faster way to do this somehow (and if I had to do this for more than a handful of frames I would have probably used ffmpeg) but the fastest way I was able to do this in GIMP was by first, preparing the overlay as a layer, selecting and copying that layer, selecting the bottom layer in the layers tab, pressing Ctrl-V to paste the overlay, ...


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It is infuriatingly difficult to get rid of the text box around the last thing you wrote. No amount of double clicking or switching tools seems to help. Here's what you have to do: Click on the text box with the text box tool or the select tool. Go to Edit>Copy. Then Edit>paste in place.


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In GIMP you could use the Select by Colour tool to select most of the grey coloured pixels, choose white as the foreground colour, then do Edit > Fill with FG color. Unfortunately, this will also erase all the vertical grey lines on the blue dots too, plus you'll probably still need to do some manual retouching. If there had been some colour separation ...


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To all those, like me, who did not find a solution by changing the mode to RGB.... The problem could be that the image has an embedded color profile that is somehow messing with how GIMP acts on the image. The solution is as follows: Image > Color Management > Discard Color Profile This will force GIMP to use its own built-in sRGB color profile. ...


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You need a GIS tool for this - thankfully one of the best GIS toolsets on the planet is open-source and freeware - QuantumGIS - often just called QGIS. Here's a link to the relevant page - it will take you a little time to get to the point that you can achieve your task, but it will be worth it - all your future mapping tasks will be far more accurate and ...


1

On linux you can losslessly optimize you png images with optipng which does not all the effect like tinyPNG does, but already some percent. optimize all your images in the current folder with: sudo apt install optipng find . -name '*.png' -exec optipng -o7 {} \;


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Templates are not just image dimensions, they also include image type and precision, color handling and default layer. But the template is only used when you create the image, the image doesn't remember it comes from a given template and you cannot assign a new template to it. If you want a new template, a possible solution is to start a new image with ...


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The bump can affect to a place where's nothing to bump. I used the grey text as the map imput. The text layer is small. Without any Offset it affects the top left corner of my full image size background layer The colored area of the brown layer is mostly deleted to transparent. The Bump map seems to make nothing: But after making the text layer to image ...


1

The image you are trying to use is not very good for automating this. The shadow is problematic. Try instead to take a picture of the subject against a plain background, but far enough away from the background itself so as not to cast a shadow. Assuming you have a suitable image, there is a semi-automatic way using the Foreground Select tool in GIMP. The ...


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On recent Ubuntu (since 18.04 at least, may be earlier) they made the Python support in Gimp optional. You can tell if your Gimp has Python support by looking at the bottom of the Filters menu that should have a Python-fu submenu alongside the Script-fu one. If it's not there you are missing Python. You can install the Gimp python support using sudo apt ...


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The example photo is noisy and unsharp, there's no contrast at all in many places of the edge. Unsharpness and shadow over the edge needs something which knows what is the hand and what is not. As already said in a comment, in automatic software that means artificial intelligence and world awareness. I have not seen such software for photo editors, but that ...


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When they write that some feature need the Python language interpreter, they mean "you need to have Python installed on your machine, so that GIMP can use it". You can find detailed instructions here for an earlier version of GIMP, which should still work. How to correctly install Python for Windows in Gimp-2.6.11 I hope you know to handle your Ubuntu, ...


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Choose black as the foreground colour Select the Brush Tool. In the tool options underneath the toolbox, set the Hardness to 100%, and size to something like 10. Use the Fuzzy select tool (Magic Wand) or the Select by Colour tool, to select the blue area Do Edit > Stroke selection, choose the "Stroke with a paint tool" option. Click Stroke. Do Select > ...


0

A very flexible way to do it: For each color, create a layer group with two layers, the source image at the bottom, and above it a layer filled with the color to extract, set to Multiply mode. Set the groups to Addition mode. If you want to do color shifts, you can move the groups around. You can also edit the layers with the source images and see the ...


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If you have a Greyscale image, click Image > Mode > RGB Choose black as the foreground colour In the Channels panel, deselect the red and alpha channel (if it exists), leaving both the green and blue selected. Do Edit > Fill with FG colour Example


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In a raster image there is no concept of an object, as there is in vector graphics. Operations are not done by recording a definition of actions on a particular entity. Actually, if there is an object at all it is either the image in total, or an individual pixel. A pixel in the image is changed in some way, and editors can record this in history, usually ...


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do I have to add a layer mask, whenever I want a gradient effect to take shape of my selection and stay on that layer? No. As klewis has said, what you do need to do is to change tools before leaving the object you are editing. This can be a useful feature, though it is also an annoyance if you are editing many gradients on different objects. Being able to ...


2

Further to my comments, there's no Undo tool in GIMP. However there is a possible work around using the Clone tool to paint back a history state selectively. It's similar to the History Brush which is available in Photoshop. Obviously I'm not sure how useful this will be for your particular case. If you have an undo step available in the history that you ...


1

From this point, if I select none, the gradient no longer sits in my rectangle selection, but is applied to the entire image. In the Gimp 2.10 UI, the Blend tool and many others remain active because you can edit your settings while applying the tool (in the Blend tool, you can move the endpoints, and even adjust the gradient). So you changed the selection ...


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Image>Properties has a "Comments" tab where you can input free text which is saved with the XCF. Keep in mind that the comment can end up in exported images (and if too big it makes the JPEG plug-in fail...).


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Simple answer: GIMP (up to v2.8) can not do that for you. But there are workarounds. At first, one side note: there are no "Gimp fonts" — all fonts come from your system. So we all can use the system font viewer. Or, as an alternative, install an external viewer for the appropriate operating system. Here are several useful links: SO question about ...


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No easy solution. I would do it that way (assuming that all layers already have an alpha channel) with some existing scripts: Create the selection Duplicate the image (Image>Duplicate) In the duplicate, Select>Invert and delete the selection on all layers using the clear-layers script. (if needed) delete the selection in the source image with the same ...


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You can use Ctrl after you press Shift to use Angle Lock (which works at 15 degree increments). It works very nicely for vertical and horizontal lines.


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If the images can be converted easily to a bitmap, and you use the import - link option rather than import - embed, the XML code will contain the full path. This would mean a substantial bit of manual labor to effectively duplicate the svg images, extract and place the filenames, truncated to remove the path and then remove all the bitmaps and replace them ...


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As per Billy Kerr's comment, "Core Pointer" is the basic mouse cursor in Device Status. You will see other input devices if you have something like a tablet and stylus. This window gathers together the current options of Toolbox, for each of your input devices: the mouse (named “Core pointer”) or either the tablet, if you have one. These options are ...


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I am a very desultory GIMP user. Each time I find myself having to learn again the most basic ropes. In my case, I came here because I needed to widen a picture by resizing its canvas and repeating central pieces in the sides. I could not obtain anything from the buckets & patterns mentioned in the first answer, so I just went on with: activate the ...


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