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Use guides and snap to guides to get perfectly horizontal or vertical paths. You can't really modify the arrow after it has been created. The script renders a raster image, and so it's not editable as an arrow. If it's on its own layer however, you can delete the layer, and then create a new arrow on a new layer. If the arrow is on its own transparent ...


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In Gimp 2.10: Add a layer above, and set the blend mode to "Color Erase" Fill with color to be erased In the picture above: The groups isn't technically needed, it is just there for demo purposes with its thumbnail displaying the result of the color erase Toggling the "Color Erase" layer off doesn't change the result, which ...


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It would be better if you could share an image, because success may depend on the image itself, for example if it's a photograph or a graphic. All I can offer here is a bit of a guess. In GIMP, use color to alpha to remove all the white on the image. Put your white layer underneath. You will see the image looks washed-out Select the top image layer, and ...


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You overlooked the first 2 pieces of advice in the comments & in the answer. Why not use a blur filter, or a gradient instead? The blur tool is just not designed to give you some huge 800px blend between 2 solid colours. Pick a more suitable tool. Just using a blown-up crop from your earlier question, so this is far more pixellated than using the ...


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Depending on whether you're happy with a completely de-saturated image or not… Just de-saturate the entire image. There are many ways to do this, from converting to greyscale, using hue/saturation or vibrance sliders etc If you want to desaturate selected areas, use a mask You can then use levels to emphasise the contrast - even right to black & white ...


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Two different problems. For photos of paper documents, it's mostly a problem of "color temperature" (your first image is a typical example), so with Gimp: Open the Sample points dialog (Windows > Dockable dialogs >Sample points) Create a sample point on an area that should be a neutral color (like the paper): Ctrl-drag from one of the rulers....


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Ignoring any actual software specifics.... In any workflow which involves both print and web projects, it's important to realize that the PPI requirements for print are much higher than PPI requirements for web content. It is not possible to enlarge or upsample web images to good quality print images. As with any raster image, upsampling merely interpolates ...


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There's usually no need to keep several versions of an XCF file, i.e. different sizes/resolution etc. Obviously, it really depends what you need to save. There may be occasions when you might want to keep different versions, for example if you need different layouts or designs for different sizes/aspect ratios. This is some general advice (not set in stone). ...


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To give an exact answer to the question title one could write: Make a selection and fill it with a gradient. But seemingly you want overpaint too sharp borders to make them smooth; you search a way to use a gradient as an alternative to the blur tool. Unfortunately gradient fills used as direct overpainting cannot be controlled enough to generate the smooth ...


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The correct term is probably "blend". Then, it all depends what you are doing. If I had two rectangular areas next to each other I would sample each color, make a selection on the whole thing and redraw a gradient, using the "Gradient" (ex-"Blend") tool. Another option is to make a selection on the whole thing and apply a ...


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If we're talking about state of the art solutions, I believe BGMv2 can be used for this as it doesn't seem to rely on temporal information. It's designed specifically for the task of removing static background when full background image is available. It handles hair really well compared to other popular options. Sources, collabs, models and everything else ...


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Fixing the parts with photos will require manual work like in @MattiaGalati's answer, but the parts with text are easy to fix with just a few filters. Duplicate layer — "paper" layer Invert colors — to later subtract it from the source Median (2 pixels) — to remove small noise Minimum (10 pixels) — to remove text Gaussian Blue (20 pixels) — to ...


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Step #1 is fixing colors so that the areas which are too dark are easier to see. You can do that with Levels, Curves and similar tools, whichever you prefer. However, step #2 is cleaning up all the noise from low ISO and I don't think GIMP (or Photoshop) has the necessary tools. I usually use Topaz Denoise AI for this as it has a lot of flexibility and can ...


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Using GIMP, I found the following improved the text in a photographed image that was quite grey: Colours > Levels > Auto Input levels > ok > File > overwrite


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For the basics, see here. However LongShadow is a GEGL filter, and executing GEGL filters from scripts is still a bit of a dark art, see here for hints.


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The Select by Color tool The tool called Select by Color does exactly what is needed to select all the opaque pixels in a layer. All you need to do is to select Alpha in the Select by dropdown, and drag Threshold all the way to the right. Then, click in any opaque area of the layer, and all the non-transparent pixels will be selected! So basically, all you ...


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In the "Brushes" window: Create a new brush: Set the brush settings as shown in the screenshot:


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Alpha to selection selects all the pixels but proportionally to their opacity (the "marching ants" are telling you where the selection level goes from >50% to <50%). This selection is fine from many things, but not to copy/paste the contents(*). If you want to have them fully selected you have to Select > Save to channel, threshold the ...


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This is a known bug with Big Sur, still awaiting a fix. A workaround is to use the "quick mask" or the selection editor to check you selection. Btw, 2.10.14 is not the latest (2.10.28 currently).


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