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This is for GIMP, and the same would be possible in Photoshop. Although not perfect, using your second image as an example, it would be possible to select the green area using the Fuzzy Select tool (aka Magic Wand), and remove most of it using a curves adjustment on the green channel by pulling a curve, then maybe increase the brightness and contrast. ...


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I did this in Photoshop, but Gimp has similar tools. I just thought the quickest way was to brute-force it ;) Use the Magic Wand selector to outline your first replacement ares… Then the Paint Bucket tool. Alt/click in the green, then click inside the selection Rinse & repeat with the other areas…


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Make a rectangle selection around the text and use the Flip tool () to flip the selection then Ctrl-H (or the Anchor icon at the bottom of the layers list) to "anchor" the result: Caveats: the content of the selection are cut and flipped, so if you want the result to fit the holed created in the source the selection has to be symmetrical (...


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After almost 10 years of your question there is a new free, modern, multiplatform player with much more features than GIMP. Its name is Krita in actual version 4.4.1, I just began work with it, and it's definitely better than Photoshop from about ten years ago (when I used it last time, so I'm not able to compare it with the actual version of PS). Some ...


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In the newest GIMP the default Crop Tool behaviour has changed to allow non-destructive cropping. Basically it crops the canvas, not the layers, and so doesn't delete any pixels. If you export the image however, the crop should be applied to the exported file. I just tested a non-destructive crop and exported the result as PNG and it works as expected. I ...


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If you select your image using CTRL+A to select all, or select part of an image using the Rectangle select too, and hit copy CTRL+C, the pattern should appear in the Patterns Panel. It will be the first item in the patterns list, named "Clipboard image". You may have to scroll up to find it. If it doesn't show, you may have selected the wrong ...


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Select black as the foreground colour (or press D to set default colours: black foreground, and white background) Make sure you have the correct layer select in the Layers panel, then select Lock alpha channel Do Edit > Fill with FG color, or use the shortcut Ctrl+, Obviously, once you've finished, unlock the alpha channel if you want to edit the ...


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Possible answer for Gimp: ofn-enclosing-circle (available here) determines the smallest circle that encloses the shape and does things with it. Note that on your image it doesn't produce the circle that you expect: .. but the circle is a tighter fit (294 px vs 300px). If you look at the Wikipedia article the smallest circle is either defined by a diameter (...


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You can draw a bounding box with the selection tool. Then from the pointer window, you can tell the x, y, w and h of the bounding box. Hope this helps.


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Forget pure color based approach - in real photos there's so much noise that you do not get the effect limited to the wanted blue parts. Bite the bullet. Make a layer duplicate and remove there all except the parts you want to make white. Draw a path or use other background removal methods. The challenge isn't impossible, but you may need to practice a while ...


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Colors > Map > Gradient Map works exactly the same in recent versions of GIMP as it did in older versions. Make sure your image has a range of tones - from black to grey midtones, and bright highlights. A gradient map can only work properly on an image that has a good range of tones. It wont work well if all your brush strokes are 100% opacity. Also ...


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As @xenoid said, you need to correct the perspective, sometimes called quadrilateral reshape. As of GIMP 2.10.22, you can do this using the Handle Transform Tool (Shift+L) in the Unified Transform group (). Simple switch to the tool, drop handles at the 4 corners of your image and then drag them around until your perspective is what you want it to be.


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I present here a solution based on xenoid's answer that so far gave me the most satisfactory results in clearing up image's background. (I am not sure if this is what the OP meant by "improving the quality", though.) I only used the Filters > Enhance > Wavelet-decompose..., without Colors > Curves.... Not having to play with color curves ...


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