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33

It's a feature of that particular font design. There is no distinction between a horizontal and slanted hyphen. Some fonts such as Adobe Garamond, Monotype Goudy, Goudy Old Style (URW), have a slanted hyphen, but the vast majority of serif fonts don't. Some also have a hyphen that looks more like a tilde, but again this is just a design choice. The reason ...


28

It can be confusing because often times you find out that people use the term "font" openly to refer to many things in typography. Here's a lively discussion on fonts and typefaces. Traditionally, font is a term used when discussing a set of characters of a certain typeface and in the same family. A font has also been used to describe a software used to ...


27

Being under the illusion that I am somewhat of an expert on the long s¹, I mostly agree with your assessment. The only slight addition I would like to make are texts talking about historical texts. On German Language SE, several answers (such as this one) would look rather ugly if the long s weren’t supported by the font used for the site. If that is the ...


25

A glyph is an individual character. It might be a letter, an accented letter, a ligature, a punctuation mark, a dingbat, etc. A font is a digital file which is used to display a typeface, which contains the entire upper- and lowercase alphabet as well as punctuation, numbers, and other special characters.


15

Google's TrueType fonts Noto Emoji (284.4 KB) and Noto Color Emoji (6.5 MB) are very good.


13

Open sans emoji should work Here is a link to a github repo https://github.com/MorbZ/OpenSansEmoji


13

If you do not want to switch to a different font, I see two quick and dirty options: As the font has a single ´ as a character, you can type s´ in your document and insert negative space in between the two, to correctly position the accent. In LibreOffice, You can do this via Format → Character → Position → Spacing → Condensed. For some reason, this is ...


12

I know this question is a bit old but no one mentioned Emoji One It's CC-BY 4.0. As of version 3 they are no longer CC BY 4.0... You can still download the last version 2.2.7 commit here but it's from 2016........


11

Unicode Characters are chosen by those that are submitted to the Unicode Technical Committee. Usually the submissions are characters that are already being used. Most of the cat characters that exist now were emoji characters, used by many japanese phone carriers before being included in unicode. These emoji are very focused on japanese culture, including ...


11

This part of your code... .amp { font-family: Baskerville, "Goudy Old Style", "Palatino", "Book Antiqua", "Warnock Pro", serif; font-weight: normal; font-style: italic; font-size: 1.1em; line-height: 1em; } Control the ampersands.... Watch the ampersands change as I toggle that CSS on and off.... If you want to change their font, ...


9

I'm not sure if the speaker would be included, but have you tried GNU Unifont? It is monospaced, it comes in TTF and it covers glyphs for every printable code point in the Unicode 6.3 Basic Multilingual Plane (BMP). I do think, however, that it's a bitmap font. You can see the insanely huge list of covered glyphs here. Monospace, on the other hand, is ...


9

Over at FileFormat.info «The Digital Rosetta Stone», I found a handy unicode character search engine. On the resulting page, click on the Fonts that support U+202F link, and there you have it. The serif fonts include: Cambria Cardo DejaVu Serif Doulos SIL FreeSerif Jomolhari JunicodeRegular LeedsUni Liberation Serif Linux Libertine Microsoft Sans Serif ...


9

If the codes you write in the question are accurate, then that’s your problem right there: the Unicode character U+0027 is not a prime. It’s a simple, typewriter apostrophe, and the setting mentioned in Wolff’s answer is likely responsible for them being changed into curly apostrophes. The correct code for a prime is U+2032; this character is never ...


8

There are five concepts here: Character set: maps numbers to abstract characters. Character: An abstraction of the representation of a character in the given medium. Since we're talking graphic design, then usually we're talking about some kind of base image. In a different medium, such as audio, a character would have a sound. Font Type: A specific set ...


8

﷽. Do I win a prize? (text to reach 30 characters)


8

Modern letter forms are the product of a combination of tradition, technical considerations, readability considerations, and interactions between handwriting and printed texts as well as between several flavours of the latin alphabet (roman type, blackletter and gaelic). Therefore I doubt that anybody can make more than educated guesses as to why certain ...


8

As already mentioned, extrema are needed for font rendering and in particular hinting. To understand this, let’s at first look at what roughly happens when autohinting a glyph with extrema as anchors (green) in a regular pixel grid¹: To make a font look nice and crisp, vertical and horizontal strokes should exactly fall into the pixel grid. An arbitrarily ...


8

This may be utterly unsatisfactory, but I think the right answer is, very Dutch, it mostly doesn't matter. In regular body text, the difference is so subtle that the average Dutch person will not notice. I am a native Dutch, and quite a language and typography nerd besides. I had to look real closely at your example to see what you were asking. Neither ...


7

A "glyph" is merely the term for a specific character in a font file. Photoshop, unlike other Adobe applications, has no Glyph panel. While it can display and utilize glyphs if they are present, there is no way to access a specific glyph from within Photoshop. Both Illustrator and InDesign have Glyph Panels which allow you to see and access all glyphs ...


7

The following is very general (the last point will explain why), but mostly based on my experience with creating several special characters (most of languages I do not speak) for a blackletter font: Search the Internet for design instructions from somebody from the community that uses a character, e.g., speakers of the languages that uses it. For letters, I ...


7

That lowercase ij is awesome 😄 My first thought was, "wow, low bridge ahead" – but I had a hunch it was to fit in with the rest of descending characters, and so it does. You even use this on the lowercase f, which makes for a fine visual rhythm in fij- words, and it's a very nice change from the usual efs. As for the capital: being a native Dutch speaker, ...


7

If you're seeing this character ☒, most likely the typeface you are using does not have that glyph in its character set, or has it assigned to a different unicode number. In which case you need to use a different typeface that actually has the ∝ character or look at the glyphs panel. Otherwise yes, assuming a typeface has a particular character and mapped ...


6

All versions of Windows come with the Character Map utility with which you can browse the available glyphs of any installed font. Enabling Advanced View will allow you to filter your results by Character Set or Group; a search function is available as well. This is hardly what I would consider "programatically", but you'll still be able to search for a glyph ...


6

Tools are only as good as the user using them. I can do vector drawings with notepad and in quite many ways I have better tools available in notepad than in Illustrator*. Possibly your question could have been better if you could have asked of a specific tool. Possibly, you can do whatever you want. Most of the time though font authoring tools dont have ...


6

From the article The Multifaceted Design of the Lowercase Sharp S (ß): Today there are two standard models for the design of the ß character. [...] They are recommendable for most of today’s typefaces. 1. The ſs Ligature Design Using a ligature of ſ and s is the usual choice for humanist typefaces and is used by both serif and sans serif typefaces. ...


6

Assuming that your IJ glyph is appropriate to the Dutch eye (which I cannot tell), it should be used as a ligature for I+J by default for Dutch texts. While you can restrict every OpenType feature to specific locales, the arguably best way to do this would be via the feature locl, which is specifically reserved for such purposes. The OpenType cookbook uses ...


5

Open the Glyphs panel (Text → Glyphs). Select a text element. Click on the glyph you want, and click the Append button in the bottom-right. If you want it in your clipboard, double-click the glyph to add it to the text-field in the bottom left of the panel—you can copy it from there.


5

For ligatures to be supported in an OpenType font, two things need to be there: the actual ligature glyphs (which you can check by scrolling through the glyph table with a symbol picker etc.) and a glyph substitution table that tells software to replace a sequence of characters by a ligature. There’s a handy piece of software called DTL OTMaster Light (free,...


5

Are there any official sources that describe how symbols and characters should be designed? And more generally—How do I approach designing characters I am unfamiliar with? A well-know source for Latin characters is http://diacritics.typo.cz For Islandic characters see also http://font.is/letur-the-making-of-thorn-thorn-eth-eth/ In general, as you already ...


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