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2

I suspect that the missing ⁹ and ⁰ are related to the need to design small numerals for pre-composed fractions. Unicode 1.0 in 1991 had the pre-composed fractions ¼, ½, ¾, ⅓, ⅔, ⅕, ⅖, ⅗, ⅘, ⅙, ⅚, ⅛, ⅜, ⅝, and ⅞. If someone designs all of those, they then have small-size ¹ through ₈, which can then be easily reused in super- and subscript glyphs. The ...


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Most fonts have a rather limited glyph set. Realistically making a font that is complete is a herculean feat. Supporting all possible font features is not possible. The manicule character hardly makes much difference. Most fonts dont have it, but even if they do borrowing one from another font is probably not a big issue. But quite many fonts out there are ...


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FontForge has a very steep learning curve. It's a fairly-powerful tool once you've learned your way around it, but those first few steps are almost impossible. Source: I've recently begun using it to design glyphs for a side hobby project of mine (a modified English alphabet allowing for a 1:1 phoneme:letter correspondence, in case anyone's curious), and I ...


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