11

This is what I find to be an acceptable solution. First, create a gradient mesh to a box as follows. Second, drag every other box to a suitable location. Third, rotate each box to a suitable angle. Fourth, drag each vertex to a suitable location. Fifth, pick up color for each vertex from the original figure. Sixth, use the original figure to create a ...


5

Stretching the bleep out of a jpg is a pretty feasible technique in this case, since this is a blurry image to begin with. You are going to see some banding if you stretch it too much, but there are things you could do to try and avoid that. Here's the image you provided, stretched to viewport siz. On my 1440p screen res, the banding goes slightly over ...


5

Use the 'A' direct selection tool to click on each of the mesh points - you will then be able to change their color. This could be a tedious process, but you can lasso-select many points at a time of same color to change several points at once. If you would like to keep the color relationships in the mesh but change the overall color similar to Photoshop's ...


4

Made this in 2 minutes in Photoshop. -Black background layer -New layer on top -Choose your blue color -Select your brush tool and choose the soft edge round brush -Turn the flow and opacity way down (10% each), enable the airbrush option and start stacking the color. -You may choose a lighter blue to get more highlights in the center of the blue :)


3

In Photoshop, there is no elegant way I know of. Maybe you could create a linear gradient and bend it the way you want, but that's a lot of hassle. However, if Illustrator is an option, you can just create the form using the path tool and then apply a vertical gradient stroke to it. If you need your graphic in Ps, you can simply copy and paste it as a ...


3

There's no way to "undo" a mesh once you've moved past the undo limit or don't want to "undo" other changes you've made since creating a mesh. As a standard practice, what I do is select the original object, copy, paste in front, then create the mesh on the front object. Refine the mesh and then group it with the back object. This way there is always the ...


3

Without seeing the art, it's a bit difficult to give exact direction. However you should be able to do the following: Select the Mesh. Choose Object > Path > Offset Path and insert a value of 0. This will create a new object which matches the outline of the mesh shape exactly. If you need objects for each internal part of the mesh, John's ...


3

It is simply not possible to use any Pathfinder operation if an object contains a mesh. You may be able to use a clipping mask or opacity mask to hide a portion of your teardrop rather than trying to remove a portion.


3

This is for Inkscape 0.92, and uses the Interpolate Extension, although something similar could also be achieved in Illustrator using a Blend. In Inkscape draw a pentagon, and fill it black, no stroke Copy and paste it in place Scale the copy to a small pentagon in the centre of the larger pentagon, and fill it white. Select both pentagons, and do ...


3

If you want to output this as an SVG, there are a couple of problems. Inkscape (and the SVG format) doesn't support conical gradients, or gradients along a stroke. Inkscape does have a gradient mesh which you could use to fake a conical gradient (see Tutorial here), but gradient meshes aren't supported in SVGs yet. Maybe it will be possible in some later SVG ...


2

If you select the gradient mesh tool then hold alt/option and click the point where you inserted the mesh, it removes it.


2

The presence of the Gradient Mesh Tool may depend on the version of Cairo library used to compile your executable. Basing upon your comment, for a 32-bit version of Windows the Gradient Mesh tool is not available, see also here.


2

When you set up the shape, and apply the gradient mesh, arrange it so that the image layer you are sampling is above the mesh layer. Make sure the eyedropper settings are set to "Point Sample" - you can change the settings by double clicking the Eyedropper tool. When colouring the mesh remember the shortcut keys - U (Mesh Tool), and I (Eyedropper). Zoom ...


2

I'm sure there are many ways this could be done, but here's one method: Create a single Y shape to cover the corners you wish to apply a highlight to, and fill it with white or light grey. In the fill panel, apply some blur to it, then copy and paste the polygon shape in place using Edit > Paste in Place - then apply that as a clipping mask to the blurred Y,...


2

I'm afraid there's no good way to do that that won't do irreparable harm to the white (knock-out) text. Your tube is being printed with two blues, the lighter of which is a solid colour with "holes" in it where the tube shows through for both the white text and the areas around the black text. Your darker blue colour is screened at the transition area (with ...


2

Per comments.. If you want something more like a "ball" then you have far too many mesh lines. You only need 1 mesh point to pull off a "ball" appearance... Actually, this could also be done with a simple radial gradient. There's really no need for a mesh specifically with a simply "ball" shape. With original information.... Assuming you want a circle ...


2

Set the edge points to the same color as the center point, then lower their opacity to 0. If you want a smooth one-color gradient, or mesh, when using opacity, the points or gradient stops should be the same color and only the opacity should change. Basically you are currently asking the blend to morph between 100% Cyan and 0% Pink. So there's a middle ...


1

On Illustrator use the mesh tool as Lucian say, you can move the vertex around. Try different grid density. In Photoshop you can simply make some blotches of color and use the smudge tool. The trick is to test a different radius and pressures. Danielillo pointed another method using a general Gaussian blur. How to create an image with complex gradient?


1

My guess is using Illustrator's mesh tool, create a random grid and play with it (see Youtube videos), then blur the whole thing.


1

Better to use a vector image editor instead, not Photoshop which is a raster image editor, and the wrong kind of software for making logos. The example below was made in Inkscape, but almost any vector image editor will do, such as Adobe Illustrator, CorelDraw, etc. It consists of a single path (shown stroked in green below) broken up into various pieces, ...


1

No. Illustrator's Blend feature does not work on Gradient Meshes. Without more information regarding the desired goal, it's difficult to provide any further guidance.


1

Mesh anchors and handles can be altered by using the Convert Anchor Point Tool, the same way you alter standard anchors. The only caveat is that mesh anchors can not be converted to/from smooth points/corner points.. they are all mesh points. You can use the Convert Anchor Point Tool and drag a mesh anchor's handles into the anchor, essentially creating a ...


1

No, unfortunately perspective is not a linear operation. What that means is that the interpolation of mesh can not happen in perspective so it wouldn't be able to hold the same look. The only way to really do this is to rasterize the mesh objects to a pixel image.


1

Illustrator will occasionally throw in Helper points on a mesh. These helper points are not immediately visible on the mesh. Their presence is often indicated by a sharp corner or direction change in a mesh path which doesn't seem to adhere to the bezier handles and points you can see. Your image would seem to have a couple of these helper points. To ...


1

I`d go for... Union of all of the existing elements (with gradients, from your drawing); add a few nodes to create smoother curvature of the "crossing" at the centre; create the mask or clip in the shape of the cube, bring it to the top; blur the shape from the Union operation and mask/clip it. Or... create three squares/rectangles with slightly rounded ...


1

As @Ryan says, you were on the right track with gradient mesh, but they take a bit of figuring out. In the below image, the top one is the image from your question and below it is a version that I recreated with a gradient mesh. It's not exactly the same, but this only took a couple of minutes and could be made more similar with a bit of work. The bottom ...


1

If the line design isn't too complex, one way of solving this problem is to create a clipping mask: convert the strokes of the object to outlines, merge the resulting objects together using pathfinder tools, create a clipping mask with the line design on top of the gradient mesh. This works in Illustrator CS5 and i can't say if newer versions allow to do ...


1

The problem is that you're trying to go from apples to oranges - the gradient in Corel Draw / Photoshop is a raster image, and you're trying to then bring it in and apply it as a vector gradient. A raster gradient has a defined size, and attempting to map it using the live trace tool causes Illustrator to try and find specific values at specific points ...


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